"Quitting Smoking": A Fate Worse than Death?

JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Feb 2008, 09:33 #31

In the Original letter Joel wrote:

"If the smoker were correct in all his assumptions of what life as an ex-smoker were like, then maybe it would not be worth it to quit. But all these assumptions are wrong. There is life after smoking, and withdrawal does not last forever. Trying to convince the smoker of this, though, is quite an uphill battle. These beliefs are deeply ingrained and are conditioned from the false positive effects experienced from cigarettes."

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"If the smoker were correct in all his assumptions of what life as an ex-smoker were like, then maybe it would not be worth it to quit. But all these assumptions are wrong. There is life after smoking, and withdrawal does not last forever. Trying to convince the smoker of this, though, is quite an uphill battle. These beliefs are deeply ingrained and are conditioned from the false positive effects experienced from cigarettes."

--------------> Why hold on to False Associations & erroneous assumptions any longer?
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Oct 2008, 21:16 #32

The last two paragraphs of Joel's initial post:

...."But if he quits smoking he will be pleasantly surprised to find out that he will feel better and be able to cope with life more efficiently than when he was a smoker. When he wakes up in the morning, he will feel tremendously better than when he awoke as a smoker. No longer will he drag out of bed feeling horrible. Now he will wake up feeling well rested and refreshed. In general, he will be calmer than when he smoked. Even when under stress, he normally will not experience the panic reactions he used to feel whenever his nicotine level fell below acceptable levels. The belief that cigarettes were needed for energy is one of the most deceptive of all. Almost any ex-smoker will attest that he has more strength, endurance, and energy than he ever did as a smoker. And the fear of prolonged withdrawal also had no merit, for withdrawal symptoms would peak within three days, and totally subside within two weeks.

If any smoker just gives himself the chance to really feel how nice not smoking is, he will no longer have the irrational fears which keeps him maintaining his deadly addiction. He will find life will become simpler, happier, cleaner, and most importantly healthier, than when he was a smoker. His only fear will now be in relapsing to smoking and all he has to do to prevent this is - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!"
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Jefferyrw
Joined: 12 Jan 2011, 17:39

16 Jan 2011, 23:37 #33

Joel wrote: For those in the early days of their quits. What you feel like the first few days is what it is like to be a smoker in withdrawal, not what it feels like to be an ex-smoker. These two states are worlds apart. To stay in the ex-smoking world only requires remembering now to never take another puff!

Joel
I think that nearly everyone starting a quit would benefit from this point made by Joel some time back ...how it feels to be a ex-smoker should never be confused with how it feels to be a smoker/addict in withdrawal.

Jeff

  
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