"Quitting Smoking": A Fate Worse than Death?

Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

June 2nd, 2005, 5:03 am #21

From: Joel Sent: 2/5/2004 12:36 PM
Lest any of us forget. We have three real world examples currently happening to board members that really show what kind of bad days smoking is capable of causing. The side effects that people may go through from quitting are nothing compared to the side effects that can be caused by not quitting. The three stories unfolding below clarify this point. No one should ever think that quitting is a fate worse than death. The best way to mimimize your risk of facing real pain and suffering is to remember to stay totally committed to the promise that you made to yourself when joining to never take another puff!

Joel

Stage 4, lung cancer interview

Quit for Life!!!

My Health
Sadly, the above post is dated now. The third story was Kim's medical update in her own words from last January. Click on the picture below for Kim's full story.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

August 10th, 2005, 8:13 pm #22

Gitte suggested we add the following links to this string:

The truth is...
It Is never too Late
Quitting too late - another perspective

Seems like a good idea to me. Thanks for the suggestion Gitte.

Joel
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Joined: December 19th, 2008, 12:00 am

January 16th, 2006, 7:40 pm #23

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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

February 23rd, 2006, 1:21 am #24

Maybe this will help put the desire to continue using cigarette smoking to feed an unnecessary, unnatural and unhealthy nicotine addiction into proper perspective.
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

February 27th, 2006, 6:13 am #25

If any smoker just gives himself the chance to really feel how nice not smoking is, he will no longer have the irrational fears which keeps him maintaining his deadly addiction.

He will find life will become simpler, happier, cleaner, and most importantly healthier, than when he was a smoker.

His only fear will now be in relapsing to smoking and all he has to do to prevent this is - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!
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Joined: December 19th, 2008, 12:00 am

March 6th, 2006, 6:20 pm #26

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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

January 1st, 2007, 2:20 pm #27

With the information that can be found at www.whyquit.com you will be able to understand and navigate the temporary period of adjustment that comes with nicotine cessation.
Quitting smoking/nicotine is doable. Comfort will come!

Read and read and read. Stuff your brain with knowledge.

Take full advantage of all the tips and support that is given freely at Freedom and WhyQuit.

Only one rule: No nicotine today, one day at a time!

Sal
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

January 29th, 2007, 9:28 pm #28

If any smoker just gives himself the chance to really feel how nice not smoking is, he will no longer have the irrational fears which keeps him maintaining his deadly addiction. He will find life will become simpler, happier, cleaner, and most importantly healthier, than when he was a smoker. His only fear will now be in relapsing to smoking and all he has to do to prevent this is - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!

Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

July 25th, 2007, 8:06 pm #29

The video below touches on the concept covered in the third paragraph here:
"If the smoker were correct in all his assumptions of what life as an ex-smoker were like, then maybe it would not be worth it to quit. But all these assumptions are wrong. There is life after smoking, and withdrawal does not last forever. Trying to convince the smoker of this, though, is quite an uphill battle. These beliefs are deeply ingrained and are conditioned from the false positive effects experienced from cigarettes."

Video Title
Dial-Up
HS/BB
Audio
Length
Added
"Will I ever stop thinking of cigarettes?" 3.97mb 11.9mb 1.57mb 10:47 11/20/06
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

November 15th, 2007, 6:47 am #30

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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

February 4th, 2008, 9:33 am #31

In the Original letter Joel wrote:

"If the smoker were correct in all his assumptions of what life as an ex-smoker were like, then maybe it would not be worth it to quit. But all these assumptions are wrong. There is life after smoking, and withdrawal does not last forever. Trying to convince the smoker of this, though, is quite an uphill battle. These beliefs are deeply ingrained and are conditioned from the false positive effects experienced from cigarettes."

................ and

"If the smoker were correct in all his assumptions of what life as an ex-smoker were like, then maybe it would not be worth it to quit. But all these assumptions are wrong. There is life after smoking, and withdrawal does not last forever. Trying to convince the smoker of this, though, is quite an uphill battle. These beliefs are deeply ingrained and are conditioned from the false positive effects experienced from cigarettes."

--------------> Why hold on to False Associations & erroneous assumptions any longer?
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

October 7th, 2008, 9:16 pm #32

The last two paragraphs of Joel's initial post:

...."But if he quits smoking he will be pleasantly surprised to find out that he will feel better and be able to cope with life more efficiently than when he was a smoker. When he wakes up in the morning, he will feel tremendously better than when he awoke as a smoker. No longer will he drag out of bed feeling horrible. Now he will wake up feeling well rested and refreshed. In general, he will be calmer than when he smoked. Even when under stress, he normally will not experience the panic reactions he used to feel whenever his nicotine level fell below acceptable levels. The belief that cigarettes were needed for energy is one of the most deceptive of all. Almost any ex-smoker will attest that he has more strength, endurance, and energy than he ever did as a smoker. And the fear of prolonged withdrawal also had no merit, for withdrawal symptoms would peak within three days, and totally subside within two weeks.

If any smoker just gives himself the chance to really feel how nice not smoking is, he will no longer have the irrational fears which keeps him maintaining his deadly addiction. He will find life will become simpler, happier, cleaner, and most importantly healthier, than when he was a smoker. His only fear will now be in relapsing to smoking and all he has to do to prevent this is - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!"
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Joined: January 12th, 2011, 5:39 pm

January 16th, 2011, 11:37 pm #33

Joel wrote: For those in the early days of their quits. What you feel like the first few days is what it is like to be a smoker in withdrawal, not what it feels like to be an ex-smoker. These two states are worlds apart. To stay in the ex-smoking world only requires remembering now to never take another puff!

Joel
I think that nearly everyone starting a quit would benefit from this point made by Joel some time back ...how it feels to be a ex-smoker should never be confused with how it feels to be a smoker/addict in withdrawal.

Jeff

  
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