"Quitting Smoking": A Fate Worse than Death?

Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

May 9th, 2003, 10:36 am #11

"If the smoker were correct in all his assumptions of what life as an ex-smoker were like, then maybe it would not be worth it to quit."
It's hard work living, decaying and dying an addict!
And nothing about life need change except your drug use!
Hope you're exicted! You're going home!
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Joined: December 19th, 2008, 12:00 am

July 15th, 2003, 11:39 am #12

don't ever be afraid to quit. it's a decision you'll never regret.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:58 pm

November 22nd, 2003, 12:41 pm #13

"If the smoker were correct in all his assumptions of what life as an ex-smoker were like, then maybe it would not be worth it to quit. But all these assumptions are wrong. There is life after smoking, and withdrawal does not last forever. Trying to convince the smoker of this, though, is quite an uphill battle. These beliefs are deeply ingrained and are conditioned from the false positive effects experienced from cigarettes."
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

January 12th, 2004, 10:14 pm #14

  • Is there any guarantee that you'd ever come this far again?
  • Your brain was tuned and conditioned to function around the presence of nicotine and its two-hour chemical half-life. What would be different next time?
  • How much more time do you have before risking being among the one-quarter of adult nicotine smokers who fail to live beyond middle-age, or the half for whom a birthday near their 60th is the last they'll ever see?
  • What chemical is worth surrenduring up to one-third of your functional lung capacity and a substantial portion of your ability to smell and taste?
  • There are only two choices. On which side of the bars will you spend the balance of your life?
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

February 6th, 2004, 2:36 am #15

Lest any of us forget.

We have three real world examples currently happening to board members that really show what kind of bad days smoking is capable of causing. The side effects that people may go through from quitting are nothing compared to the side effects that can be caused by not quitting. The three stories unfolding below clarify this point. No one should ever think that quitting is a fate worse than death. The best way to mimimize your risk of facing real pain and suffering is to remember to stay totally committed to the promise that you made to yourself when joining to never take another puff!

Joel

Stage 4, lung cancer interview

Quit for Life!!!

My Health
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

February 7th, 2004, 8:42 pm #16

This is a good article for anyone questioning whether or not "this will ever get better." Your health and your life will likely be infinitely better than it would have been if you never quit as long as you stick with your commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: December 19th, 2008, 12:00 am

December 29th, 2004, 8:19 pm #17

This is a good article for anyone questioning whether or not "this will ever get better." Your health and your life will likely be infinitely better than it would have been if you never quit as long as you stick with your commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

January 3rd, 2005, 1:40 am #18

If we'll only open our mind to the possibility that we've fogotten just how wonderful it is to allow our brain's neurochemical flow to be dictated by life instead of nicotine, and to the possibility that quitting really occurred on the day that nicotine took control of our brain, this could be one of the most mind expanding journeys you've ever made.

Recovery truly is a journey in recovering hundreds of expectations of engaging all aspects of life without reaching for nicotine. Physical withdrawal symptoms, emotional recovery, subconsciously triggered crave episodes and conscious thought fixation are your stepping stones to true healing, calmness, cue reconditioning and a healthy rational mind. Why fear this wonderful adventure when we can embrace it! What sense does it make to fear returning to a day where we go the entire day without once wanting to put nicotine into our bloodstream?

Forget about using quitting "forever" as your recovery yardstick. What good is waiting to celebrate victory until after "forever is complete and we're dead? Who is coming to that party?

Allow each hour of freedom, challenge overcome, and full day of healing to reflect the full and complete victory each represents. The next few minutes are all that will ever matter and each will be entirely doable. If allowed, soon they'll build into healing, life expectancy and the richest comfort you've known since climbing aboard nicotine's never-ending neurochemical roller-coaster ride of dopamine/adrenaline/serotonin highs and lows.

The old addiction proverb is true. "One is too many and a thousand never enough." It's time to go home now and there's one one rule ... no nicotine just one hour, challenge and day at a time... NONE!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John (Gold x5)
Last edited by John (Gold) on March 28th, 2009, 8:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:59 pm

April 24th, 2005, 10:43 pm #19

Good Morning Freedom,

Its Sunday on my end of the world and Sundays tend to be a little quieter on the board but for those looking for a little inspirational reading I thought I'd pop up a few classics.


Lorraine GoldX3
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Joined: April 4th, 2005, 7:00 am

May 27th, 2005, 11:52 am #20

The smoker often feels that he needs a cigarette in order to get out of bed in the morning. Typically, when he awakes he feels a slight headache, tired, irritable, depressed and disoriented. He is under the belief that all people awake feeling this way. He is fortunate though, because he has a way to stop these horrible feelings. He smokes a cigarette or two. Then he begins waking up and feels human again. Once he is awake, he feels he needs cigarettes to give him energy to make it through the day. When he is under stress and nervous, the cigarettes calm him down. Giving up this wonder drug seems ludicrous to him.

But if he quits smoking he will be pleasantly surprised to find out that he will feel better and be able to cope with life more efficiently than when he was a smoker. When he wakes up in the morning, he will feel tremendously better than when he awoke as a smoker. No longer will he drag out of bed feeling horrible. Now he will wake up feeling well rested and refreshed. In general, he will be calmer than when he smoked. Even when under stress, he normally will not experience the panic reactions he used to feel whenever his nicotine level fell below acceptable levels. The belief that cigarettes were needed for energy is one of the most deceptive of all. Almost any ex-smoker will attest that he has more strength, endurance, and energy than he ever did as a smoker. And the fear of prolonged withdrawal also had no merit, for withdrawal symptoms would peak within three days, and totally subside within two weeks.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

June 2nd, 2005, 5:03 am #21

From: Joel Sent: 2/5/2004 12:36 PM
Lest any of us forget. We have three real world examples currently happening to board members that really show what kind of bad days smoking is capable of causing. The side effects that people may go through from quitting are nothing compared to the side effects that can be caused by not quitting. The three stories unfolding below clarify this point. No one should ever think that quitting is a fate worse than death. The best way to mimimize your risk of facing real pain and suffering is to remember to stay totally committed to the promise that you made to yourself when joining to never take another puff!

Joel

Stage 4, lung cancer interview

Quit for Life!!!

My Health
Sadly, the above post is dated now. The third story was Kim's medical update in her own words from last January. Click on the picture below for Kim's full story.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

August 10th, 2005, 8:13 pm #22

Gitte suggested we add the following links to this string:

The truth is...
It Is never too Late
Quitting too late - another perspective

Seems like a good idea to me. Thanks for the suggestion Gitte.

Joel
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Joined: December 19th, 2008, 12:00 am

January 16th, 2006, 7:40 pm #23

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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

February 23rd, 2006, 1:21 am #24

Maybe this will help put the desire to continue using cigarette smoking to feed an unnecessary, unnatural and unhealthy nicotine addiction into proper perspective.
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

February 27th, 2006, 6:13 am #25

If any smoker just gives himself the chance to really feel how nice not smoking is, he will no longer have the irrational fears which keeps him maintaining his deadly addiction.

He will find life will become simpler, happier, cleaner, and most importantly healthier, than when he was a smoker.

His only fear will now be in relapsing to smoking and all he has to do to prevent this is - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!
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Joined: December 19th, 2008, 12:00 am

March 6th, 2006, 6:20 pm #26

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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

January 1st, 2007, 2:20 pm #27

With the information that can be found at www.whyquit.com you will be able to understand and navigate the temporary period of adjustment that comes with nicotine cessation.
Quitting smoking/nicotine is doable. Comfort will come!

Read and read and read. Stuff your brain with knowledge.

Take full advantage of all the tips and support that is given freely at Freedom and WhyQuit.

Only one rule: No nicotine today, one day at a time!

Sal
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

January 29th, 2007, 9:28 pm #28

If any smoker just gives himself the chance to really feel how nice not smoking is, he will no longer have the irrational fears which keeps him maintaining his deadly addiction. He will find life will become simpler, happier, cleaner, and most importantly healthier, than when he was a smoker. His only fear will now be in relapsing to smoking and all he has to do to prevent this is - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!

Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

July 25th, 2007, 8:06 pm #29

The video below touches on the concept covered in the third paragraph here:
"If the smoker were correct in all his assumptions of what life as an ex-smoker were like, then maybe it would not be worth it to quit. But all these assumptions are wrong. There is life after smoking, and withdrawal does not last forever. Trying to convince the smoker of this, though, is quite an uphill battle. These beliefs are deeply ingrained and are conditioned from the false positive effects experienced from cigarettes."

Video Title
Dial-Up
HS/BB
Audio
Length
Added
"Will I ever stop thinking of cigarettes?" 3.97mb 11.9mb 1.57mb 10:47 11/20/06
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

November 15th, 2007, 6:47 am #30

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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

February 4th, 2008, 9:33 am #31

In the Original letter Joel wrote:

"If the smoker were correct in all his assumptions of what life as an ex-smoker were like, then maybe it would not be worth it to quit. But all these assumptions are wrong. There is life after smoking, and withdrawal does not last forever. Trying to convince the smoker of this, though, is quite an uphill battle. These beliefs are deeply ingrained and are conditioned from the false positive effects experienced from cigarettes."

................ and

"If the smoker were correct in all his assumptions of what life as an ex-smoker were like, then maybe it would not be worth it to quit. But all these assumptions are wrong. There is life after smoking, and withdrawal does not last forever. Trying to convince the smoker of this, though, is quite an uphill battle. These beliefs are deeply ingrained and are conditioned from the false positive effects experienced from cigarettes."

--------------> Why hold on to False Associations & erroneous assumptions any longer?
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

October 7th, 2008, 9:16 pm #32

The last two paragraphs of Joel's initial post:

...."But if he quits smoking he will be pleasantly surprised to find out that he will feel better and be able to cope with life more efficiently than when he was a smoker. When he wakes up in the morning, he will feel tremendously better than when he awoke as a smoker. No longer will he drag out of bed feeling horrible. Now he will wake up feeling well rested and refreshed. In general, he will be calmer than when he smoked. Even when under stress, he normally will not experience the panic reactions he used to feel whenever his nicotine level fell below acceptable levels. The belief that cigarettes were needed for energy is one of the most deceptive of all. Almost any ex-smoker will attest that he has more strength, endurance, and energy than he ever did as a smoker. And the fear of prolonged withdrawal also had no merit, for withdrawal symptoms would peak within three days, and totally subside within two weeks.

If any smoker just gives himself the chance to really feel how nice not smoking is, he will no longer have the irrational fears which keeps him maintaining his deadly addiction. He will find life will become simpler, happier, cleaner, and most importantly healthier, than when he was a smoker. His only fear will now be in relapsing to smoking and all he has to do to prevent this is - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!"
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Joined: January 12th, 2011, 5:39 pm

January 16th, 2011, 11:37 pm #33

Joel wrote: For those in the early days of their quits. What you feel like the first few days is what it is like to be a smoker in withdrawal, not what it feels like to be an ex-smoker. These two states are worlds apart. To stay in the ex-smoking world only requires remembering now to never take another puff!

Joel
I think that nearly everyone starting a quit would benefit from this point made by Joel some time back ...how it feels to be a ex-smoker should never be confused with how it feels to be a smoker/addict in withdrawal.

Jeff

  
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