Quitting or Recovering?

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

May 6th, 2006, 2:08 am #1


Quitting or Recovering?
 Synonyms for the word "quit" clearly apply to the dependency recovery journey upon which you've embarked. They include the words abandon, break off, check out, chunk, conclude, desert, desist, discontinue, drop, exit, forsake, give up, go, halt, leave, push out, push off, relinquish, renounce, resign, retire, secede, suspend, surrender, terminate and vacate.

What I hope you'll grow to appreciate is that quitting's true application should be to the day that nicotine took control of our mind, not the day we decided to take control back.

One of the most frightening aspects of chemical addiction is how quickly dependency onset causes the new slave to totally forget just how wonderful it was being free. An endless cycle of mandatory dopamine/adrenaline highs and lows rapidly suppress, overwrite and/or erase almost all memory of the calm, quiet and responsive mind we once called home.

Is it "us" to spend the balance of life reaching for a central nervous system stimulant when the moment calls for relaxation, or to use nicotine to steal an unearned dopamine "aaahhh" reward sensation when loss or tragedy call for sadness and sorrow? We expect that stressful situations will cause the pH of our body's fluids to turn acidic. But is it our destiny that those acidic juices will forever neutralize an addict's reserves of the alkaloid nicotine, causing every stressful situation to be far more intense than need be? Was it us to interrupt many of the most wonderful times in our lives so that we could hunt for a suitable place and steal the time needed to service a mandatory chemical need?

Nicotine's two-hour chemical half-life and ability to imitate acetylcholine combined to exert command and control over more than 200 of our body's neuro-chemicals. It quickly robbed each of us of the ability to feel, experience and reflect accurate and honest emotions.

Although tobacco industry nicotine delivery engineering has clearly enhanced modern nicotine's grip upon the mind, it did not invent it. Still, the tobacco industry knows how quickly dependency robs new addicts of their emotional self-identity, and their advertising plays upon it.

"Marlboro, come to where the flavor is!" Flavor? Deep down we hopefully still recall just how utterly horrible those first cigarettes tasted. The more than 500 gases and 3,500 chemical particles in each puff did not taste good but there just had to be an explanation as to why we didn't stop. The tobacco industry was more than happy to hammer home every reason except the truth - our brain's defenses quickly altered functional acetylcholine receptor counts and we now needed to continue using nicotine to avoid experiencing the sense of loss felt while waiting for the brain to restore natural neuronal sensitivities.

Taste? How many tastebuds are inside your lungs? Like, love? As Joel says, it isn't that we liked smoking but that we didn't like what happened when we didn't smoke. Also to like something, doesn't there have to be an honest basis for comparison? If smokers retained honest memories of what it was like to be totally free they certainly wouldn't call recovery quitting.

But last year in the U.S. tobacco companies spent $14 billion dollars trying to keep them convinced as to why they smoked. Think about the image, status and message conveyed to both youth never-smokers and hard core smokers by cigarette brand names: Alpine, Austin, Belair, Basic, Best Value, Bronson, Bucks, Cambridge, Camel, Champion, Class A, Eagle, Eclipse, Gold Coast, Grand Prix, Jade, Kool, Knights, Lark, Liberty, Lucky Strike, Main Street, Marlboro, Maverick, Merit, Misty, Monarch, Mustang, Natural American Spirit, Newport, Now, Palace, Parliament, Passion, Passport, Players, Pride, Prince, Pure Natural, Pyramid, Quality, Rave, Riviera, Roger, Rosebud, Satin, Savannah, Signature, Sonic, Southern Harvest, Sport, Springwater, Sundance, Tempo, Tourney, Triumph, True, USA Gold, Vantage, Viceroy, Virginia Slims, Wave, Wild Geese, Wildfire, Wildhorse, Windsail, and Yours.

Lost in the world of "nicotine normal," we were each provided a new identity, one that might help us explain why we allowed each and every puff to destroy more air sacs, pump more fats into our arteries and keep us content little slaves.

All the neuro-chemicals that nicotine commanded already belonged to us. We lost none. We've left zeroe behind. Recovery is simply investing the time needed to readjust to again becoming comfortable as us.

Although the word "quitting" is part of the fabric of smoking cessation, if we allow it, it will always carry an image of leaving something behind. When you think of this word I hope you'll ponder when the real quitting took place. We're coming home to the truth about where we've been. Baby steps, patience, and honesty. You'll soon be comfortable engaging all aspects of life without nicotine. You've left absolutely nothing of value behind!

Still just one guiding principle, a principle that will always remain our common bond ... no nicotine just one day at a time, Never Take Another Puff, Dip or Chew!

John (Gold x6)

 
Last edited by John (Gold) on June 18th, 2012, 10:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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whosthisitsmesilly
whosthisitsmesilly

May 6th, 2006, 2:36 am #2

Yes Indeed





I have been quit for 1 Month, 4 Weeks, 19 hours, 37 minutes and 15 seconds (58 days). I have saved £244.09 by not smoking 1,176 cigarettes. I have saved 4 Days and 2 hours of my life. My Quit Date: 08/03/2006 00:00
Cathy
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KatieDidIt1999
KatieDidIt1999

May 6th, 2006, 8:09 am #3

What a beautiful post........

"Baby steps, patience, and honesty. You'll soon be comfortable engaging all aspects of life without nicotine. You've left absolutely nothing of value behind!"

Quit being free at 15 and found it again at 48.....
Kat
122 Free Days
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

May 30th, 2006, 2:42 am #4

Although the word "quitting" is part of the fabric of smoking cessation, if we allow it, it will always carry an image of leaving something behind. When you think of this word I hope you'll ponder when the real quitting took place. We're coming home to the truth about where we've been. Baby steps, patience, and honesty. You'll soon be comfortable engaging all aspects of life without nicotine. You've left absolutely nothing of value behind!

Still just one guiding principle, a principle that will always remain our common bond ... no nicotine just one day at a time, Never Take Another Puff, Dip or Chew!

John (Gold x6)
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

August 26th, 2006, 8:55 am #5

It's not Quitting so much as Beginning. Beginning and then continuing a process of recovery of your natural-born birthright to live free of the grip of a highly addictive chemical compound, nicotine.

Comfortably adjusted yet never cured. We don't graduate from nicotine's ability to control , we learn how to use our ability of control and live at peace with our acquired addiction by ensuring nicotine's absence from our blood chemistry. Simply by declaring a permanent 'cease fire' and NTAP.

Recovering the life you were meant to live, clean of nicotine, is what it is to be truly free.
NTAP, No Nicotine Today - we each are recovering the 'Real Me' a bit more - One Day at a Time.

JoeJ Free - Free and Healing for One Year, Seven Months, Fifteen Days, 10 Hours and 34 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 45 Days and 21 Hours, by avoiding the use of 14811 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $3,073.45 NTAP!
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Joe D0
Joe D0

September 12th, 2006, 8:34 am #6

Great encouragement Joe. As usual, another gem of informative healing education. Awesome! and thank you bro.
Joe Do - Free and Healing for Twenty Seven Days, 12 Hours and 5 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 3 Days and 19 Hours, by avoiding the use of 1100 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $275.35.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

September 22nd, 2006, 10:54 am #7


This can be one of the most emotionally rewarding chapters of our life if we'll only allow ourselves to stop being afraid. Drug addiction is all about rather amazing brain reward pathways that somehow make dopamine memories vastly more vivid, important and salient than any others, including who we once were. You are buried beneath them and we're here to help dig you out!

It's very normal to be afraid of both failure and success and to feel a bit lost right now. But try hard to shed those fears as coming home after being away so long can and should be one of the most wonderful journeys you've ever made. Just one rule ... no nicotine today!

We're with you in spirit! Breathe deep, hug hard, live long!

John (Gold x7)
Last edited by John (Gold) on June 18th, 2012, 10:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RobinS614
RobinS614

September 22nd, 2006, 3:59 pm #8

Thanks John, another jewel in the crown.

Quit saying quit.

Instead I say this - I took this evil chemical, life sapping, horrible disease giving, premature death providing, stink generating, social outcaste making, bank balance reducing, death merchant and got rid of it. Good riddance.

Robin - day 102
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

September 22nd, 2006, 7:02 pm #9

Robin, the concept of "quitting" and the natural sense of self deprivation that seems to come with "quitting" is so deeply ingrained in our minds that to "quit saying quit" or stop thinking it would, in itself, be a most amazing feat. My only hope is that a bit of honest reflection on exactly "when" the real quitting took place, and mixing things up a bit, might possibly tend to diminish or weaken the psychological baggage that naturally flows from ending use of a chemical that produced a powerful dopamine "aaahhh" sensation within 8 to 10 seconds of that first puff.

But even there, when assigning value to "quitting" and the "aaahhhs," we tended to be less than honest in discarding the negative sensation that often immediately proceeded an "aaahhh". It's normal to dwell on the positive while suppressing negatives. But for every chemical high there was a corresponding low of varying depth. If we waiting too long between nicotine fixes our nicotine reserves could could fall to the point of feeling depressed when in situations that wouldn't allow us to smoke, or tremendous anxiety if we ran out, misplaced our nicotine delivery device or encountered a stressful acid generating event that neutralized reserves of the alkaloid nicotine (WHERE ARE MY SMOKES, I NEED A CIGARETTE NOW!!!)

Here I hope to get us to reflect upon those first days, when use of an external chemical to steal our own neuro-chemcials caused us to quickly bury almost all memory of the "real us" beneath a pile of powerful "aaahhh" memories.

Food, water, reproduction, accomplishment, the brain's dopamine pathways functioned as designed to make all "aaahhh" memories the most important or salient of all, as doing so ensured our survival. What the design didn't plan on was that some external chemical would, by chance, fit dopamine pathway locks (neuron receptors) and pump out an endless stream of unearned dopamine and that the resulting salient memories would take our mind and memory hostage.

Recovery is about investing in again allowing the brain to function as close to design as possible. It's about giving the brain time to reduce or down-regulate the millions of extra nicotinic type acetylcholine receptors activated in what appears to have been the brain's attempt to diminish nicotine's impact on dopamine output (desensitization). It's about developing the patience to allow ourselves to again taste what it's like to allow life to control our brain's neuro-chemical flow.

Whether we see this as quitting or recovering I hope that an enhanced understanding of this journey home helps diminish needless fears of both failure and success, and allows you greater awareness of the gradually unfolding beauty that is "you!" In 30 years I never knew that flour wasn't just white but has its own wonderfully subtle smell.

Yes, coming home can be an oh so special time of self discovery but even here, whether we allow it to be or not, all levels of the mind and body will continue healing so long as we adhere to just one concept ... no nicotine today, Never Take Another Puff, Dip or Chew!

John (Gold x7)

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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

October 7th, 2006, 7:25 am #10

Loss or Gain -
standing dread on its head
Are you quitting or recovering? Do you feel loss or gain. I do hope your reading here brings you to the realization that the real "quitting" took place on the day that our reason for starting to smoke became irrelevant - the day we lost the freedom and autonomy to simply turn and walk away.

For many it happened far quicker than then appreciated. Our brain's defenses attempted to desensitized the mind to one of earth's most potent toxins that by happenstance so closely resembled the body's acetylcholine molecule that it fit a host of neuro-chemical locks (receptors). Pumping out vastly more dopamine than normal, the brain grew or activated millions of extra nicotinic type acetylcholine receptors in at least eleven different brain regions.

But, now any attempt to stop using nicotine would temporarily leave us with far more acetylcholine receptors than needed. We would briefly find ourselves de-sensitized to the flow dopamine, adrenaline and serotonin. Upon beginning to sense and notice this numbed and de-sensitized state, wouldn't it be normal and logical to believe that we were leaving a big big part of us behind? Wouldn't it be natural to believe that nicotine defined who we were, that without it we would not be us?

Depressed and reward-less anxiety, an explosion of tension sparked anger following the shortest fuse we may have ever known, is this recovery? When happening inside our own mind, how could this not be seen as "quitting"?

Understanding the recovery process and removing self-induced anxieties associated with needless fright about leaving "us" behind can make the mind's period of neuronal re-sensitization vastly less challenging. Throw in an appreciation of the importance of maintaining stable blood sugar by not skipping meals -- in learning to again feed ourselves now that nicotine is no longer our spoon -- and you might see transition as "recovery" even as it happens.

But recovery isn't just developing the patience to allow time for receptor counts to return to normal. It's about reclaiming numerous aspects of a life once drenched in nicotine, about picking up the pieces. It's about rediscovering the fact that everything we once did while high on nicotine (our dopamine/adrenaline intoxication) can be done just as well or better without nicotine.

Our dependency feeding patterns conditioned our subconscious mind to expect nicotine at specific times or places, during certain events or activities, when with particular people or when encountering certain emotions. Some of us had more aspects of life consumed by our addiction than others but all making this journey home share a common thread, we're taking back our life.

We can dread or even avoid encountering our nicotine triggers. We know that each is capable of generating a mini anxiety panic attack lasting less than three minutes but, due to time distortion, feeling vastly longer (be sure and look at a clock). But following each crave episode we are rewarded with the return of another aspect of life.

There may be subtle distinctions between similar triggers that are nearly impossible to discern but the subconscious mind does not argue or debate. If it does not receive the expected result - nicotine - it quickly moves on. Our reward is that now another person, place, thing, time or emotion has been reclaimed.

Whether easy, hard or somewhere in-between, in order to keep the recovery process moving forward requires following just one guiding principle, no nicotine today, Never Take Another Puff, Dip or Chew!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John (Gold x7)


Last edited by John (Gold) on June 18th, 2012, 10:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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smsh28
smsh28

October 7th, 2006, 7:40 am #11

Quote:
You've left absolutely nothing of value behind!


Truer words have never been spoken!


Quote:
Instead I say this - I took this evil chemical, life sapping, horrible disease giving, premature death providing, stink generating, social outcaste making, bank balance reducing, death merchant and got rid of it. Good riddance.


LOL. I love that, Robin! If I ever get my memory working properly I might use it.


Quote:
It's about giving the brain time to reduce or down-regulate the millions of extra nicotinic type acetylcholine receptors activated in what appears to have been the brain's attempt to diminish nicotine's impact on dopamine output (desensitization). It's about developing the patience to allow ourselves to again taste what it's like to allow life to control our brain's neuro-chemical flow.

Not to emphasise my impatience, but how long does that take?

Sonya
I took this evil chemical, life sapping, horrible disease giving, premature death providing, stink generating, social outcaste making, bank balance reducing, death merchant and got rid of it 22 days, 12 hours, 37 minutes and 10 seconds ago. WOO! I've not smoked 676 death sticks, and saved $98.08.
I've saved 2 days, 8 hours and 18 minutes of my life.
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

October 7th, 2006, 8:00 am #12

Hi Sonya,

This might be interesting to you: Restoring volume control
One day at a time, no nicotine today!

Sal
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

October 7th, 2006, 9:18 am #13

Excellent question, Sonya. I wish we had an single and consistent answer but science just isn't there yet. Everything I've read to date suggests that once nicotine's arrival stops resensitization commences in earnest and is completed rapidly in some brain regions, and with some types of acetylcholine receptors, while taking longer in others.

In my mind, correctly or incorrectly, I like to relate the brain's capacity to "downregulate" receptor counts to other physical healing such as restoration of our sense of smell or the healing of cilia in bronchial tubes (our sweeper brooms). But even after the initial healing of those functions, I'm sure there's additional gradual ongoing sensitivity restoration over time. The probem is that research in this area is ongoing , new, studies are hard to compare, and most studies are of mice or rats, although we do a couple on humans.


New studies continue to come out and tend to openly declare how little we currently know in making statements such as "chronic nicotine exposure induces upregulation of nicotinic receptors, but the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood" (see

Nuutinen S, Ekokoski E, Lahdensuo E, Tuominen RK.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

October 7th, 2006, 9:28 am #14

Yes, Joe, "evil" normally tends to imply personification but as Dr. Hienz Ginzel, MD, who spent much of his life studying nicotine, recently wrote reminding me, nicotine is one of the most deadly toxins on earth - ranked in pharmacology books as a super toxin (he actually faxed me a page from his book). As a noun "evil" is also defined as "something that is a cause or source of suffering, injury, or destruction." John
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

October 7th, 2006, 9:38 am #15

NEUROPHARMACOLOGY AND BIOLOGY OF
NEURONAL NICOTINIC RECEPTORS
Kenneth J. Kellar, Ph.D.
Department of Pharmacology
Georgetown University School of Medicine

What We Know

Nicotine's important effects on the brain, spinal cord, and autonomic nervous system are mediated by nicotinic cholinergic receptors. These receptors, which normally respond to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, exist as several subtypes that differ in the details of their exact structure and characteristics, but each forms an ion channel through the cell membrane that allows sodium, potassium, and calcium ions to flow into or out of the cell when the receptor is activated by nicotine. This in turn typically leads to depolarization of the cell and an excitatory response. For example, nicotine stimulates cells in the adrenal gland to secrete epinephrine (adrenaline) into the blood, and thus it activates a number of systems collectively involved in the body's "fight or flight" responses.

Nicotinic receptors are found on neurons throughout the brain, including the cerebral cortex, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, basal ganglia, midbrain, and hindbrain. They are often associated with the cell bodies and axons of major neurotransmitter systems, and they appear to influence the release of several different neurotransmitters, including catecholamines, acetylcholine, GABA, and glutamate. Nicotine, in fact, stimulates the release of dopamine and norepinephrine in specific neuronal circuits thought to be closely involved in so-called reward functions. This action may underlie the addictive liability of nicotine; in fact, its action to stimulate dopamine neurotransmission in these specific reward circuits is consistent with the actions of other well-known drugs of abuse, such as cocaine and amphetamine.

In addition to its actions in the brain's reward circuits, nicotine stimulates the release of certain pituitary gland hormones, such as prolactin and ACTH. Measurement of nicotine's effects on these hormones offers a window on its in vivo pharmacological actions and can be used to assess how acute and chronic exposure to nicotine affect its receptors. For example, in rats a single injection of nicotine stimulates prolactin release, but a second injection given any time up to several hours after the first is ineffective, indicating that the nicotinic receptors are desensitized. This desensitization is reversible, and within about 12 hours after the first nicotine injection, receptor function is restored.

In contrast, after chronic exposure to nicotine (for 10 days), a single injection does not stimulate prolactin release even up to 8 days after chronic exposure has ended. This suggests that the function of these receptors is lost permanently - the receptors are inactivated as opposed to desensitized. Nicotine-stimulated prolactin release does return about 14 days after the last exposure to nicotine, time enough for new nicotinic receptors to be synthesized by the neurons involved.

One of the interesting and more unusual aspects of nicotine's effects on brain nicotinic receptors is that chronic exposure to nicotine in rats, mice, and humans actually increases the density (number) of these receptors. Thus, in rats or mice exposed to nicotine for 7 to 21 days, the density of these receptors is increased by 30 to 100 percent in many areas of the brain. In the brains of smokers, the density of the nicotinic receptors is 100 to 300 percent higher than in nonsmokers. The higher density of receptors, however, may not necessarily translate into an increased level of functions mediated by these receptors. Quite the opposite may be the case, as demonstrated by the prolactin studies described above. On the other hand, recent studies that examined nicotine-stimulated dopamine and norepinephrine release in vivo found that administration of low doses of nicotine could actually increase the release of these neurotransmitters in some brain areas.

What We Need To Know More About

This difference in how chronic administration of nicotine affects nicotine-stimulated prolactin release and dopamine release in vivo probably reflects fundamental differences in the regulation of the subtypes of nicotinic receptors that mediate each of these responses. Thus, a critical task is to identify the receptor subtypes that are associated with the pharmacological actions of nicotine in altering neurotransmission and ultimately behavior. The means to accomplish this task are beginning to emerge in the form of new methods and tools to localize and identify the specific receptor subtypes in specific areas of the brain and spinal cord and in peripheral nervous tissue. These include new high-affinity ligands to label the receptors, subunit-specific antibodies that allow determination of the subunit composition of the receptor subtypes, patch-clamp measurements of the conductance, and rapid regulation of the receptors' ion channels. In addition, new approaches to studying the characteristics of the receptor subtypes and to determining their roles in vivo have been developed using the methods of recombinant molecular biology, including the production of stably transfected cell lines that express a single subtype of nicotinic receptor (which allows precise characterization of that receptor's properties) and knockout mice lacking a specific subunit of the receptors.

A fundamental question is, Which subtype(s) of nicotinic receptors are involved in the rewarding aspects of nicotine's actions? Is it the receptor that is inactivated by chronic nicotine and thus does not fully function after chronic exposure to nicotine? Is it the receptor whose function is actually increased during chronic exposure? Or is it a combination of receptor subtypes? And beyond the neurobiology of nicotine's actions on its receptors is an even more intriguing question: How do nicotine's effects on neurotransmission lead to alterations in the fundamental drives and behaviors associated with addiction? The means are available to begin to address these questions, and the answers are likely to have relevance to more than just nicotine addiction.

Recommended Reading

Benwell, E.M., and Balfour, D.J.K. Regional variation in the effects of nicotine on catecholamine overflow in rat brain. Eur J Pharmacol 325:13-20, 1997.

Hulihan-Giblin, B.A.; Lumpkin, M.D.; and Kellar, K.J. Acute effects of nicotine on prolactin release in the rat: Agonist and antagonist effects of a single injection of nicotine. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 252:15-20, 1990.

Hulihan-Giblin, B.A.; Lumpkin, M.D.; and Kellar, K.J. Effects of chronic administration of nicotine on prolactin release in the rat: Inactivation of prolactin release by repeated injections of nicotine. J Pharmacol Exp Ther 252:21-25, 1990.

Marshall, D.L.; Redfern, P.H.; and Wonnacott, S. Presynaptic nicotinic modulation of dopamine release in the three ascending pathways studied by in vivo microdialysis: Comparison of naive and chronic nicotine-treated rats. J Neurochem 68:1511-1519, 1997.

Wonnacott, S. Presynaptic nicotinic ACh receptors. Trends Neurosci 20:92-98, 1997.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

December 18th, 2006, 8:05 pm #16

From John's original:

What I hope you'll grow to appreciate is that quitting's true application should be to the day that nicotine took control of our mind, not the day we decided to take control back.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

February 23rd, 2007, 12:47 pm #17

This can be one of the most emotionally rewarding chapters of our life if we'll only allow ourselves to stop being afraid. Drug addiction is all about rather amazing brain reward pathways that somehow make dopamine memories vastly more vivid, important and salient than any others, including who we once were. You are buried beneath them and we're here to help dig you out!

It's very normal to be afraid of both failure and success and to feel a bit lost right now. But try hard to shed those fears as coming home after being away so long can and should be one of the most wonderful journeys you've ever made. Just one rule ... no nicotine today!

We're with you in spirit! Breathe deep, hug hard, live long!

John (Gold x7)
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

March 27th, 2007, 10:32 pm #18

All the neuro-chemicals that nicotine commanded already belonged to us. We lost none. We've left zero behind. Recovery is simply investing the time needed to readjust to again becoming comfortable as us.

(From John's original post)
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

April 16th, 2007, 8:57 pm #19

If these next few minutes are totally challenge-less then in your mind expand them to hours, days, weeks or even months to imagine the calm of a mind and life reclaimed. But should you feel challenge be sure to give thought to the reward at the end. Recovery is just that, the taking back of life, picking up the pieces. Initially feeling de-sensitized, it's normal to be afraid the first couple of weeks, but the more we calm those needless inner fears the easier to see the unfolding beauty that captivity kept hidden. Whether noticed or not, this is one of the most wonderful periods in our life. You're coming home. Embrace it!

John (Gold x7)

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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

June 27th, 2007, 10:34 pm #20

Restating an earlier post 
Once and for all, nicotine does not purposefully harbor 'evil' intent. Yes, it's effects are evil. And yet...... it is simply a chemical we physically and psychologically became addicted to using. Addiction to nicotine is caused by a chemical oddity. The nicotine molecule fits in our brain's reward control pathways where it should not. I found it essential to always remember regardless of it's effect nicotine is simply a chemical compound, as is Asprin. That's all it is. It is not naturally occuring in the human body. It is non-essential to continuing to live a normal healthy happy life. Quite the opposite. Continuing the use of this harmful chemical will most surely rob users of health and eventually end their life much shorter than should be.

Unlike asprin or thousands of beneficial chemical compounds, nicotine is extremely addictive and regular ingestion has deadly consequences in the human body.
Circulation and smoking 
Furthermore, the favored method of drug delivery, inhaling the hot noxious nicotine laden smoke from a paper tube of smoldering dried tobacco, constantly assaults the human body with thousands of harmful chemical compounds. More than 50 of these 'sidestream' compounds have been found to be carcinogenic.

Yet the chemical compound nicotine has no intent, no desire, no intelligence or forethought of malice. Neither evil nor good. As John has so often explained - Nicotine has no I.Q.

We do have an IQ, and therein lies our most powerful advantage.
We are not outsmarting an 'evil' chemical nor are we battling some junkie demon trapped deep inside of us. We are gettin rid of a substance that is not part of the natural human chemical composition. We are re-learning to live as ourselves, as we are meant to be, nicotine clean and free. We can live normally, naturally, & very well without nicotine. As we are supposed to really live.


Almost everyone began using tobacco with a distinct disadvantage. None of us realized how totally controlling this chemical would be in our brain's reward pathways. The addictive nature of nicotine is still not widely publicized.

Even less publicized are the beautiful benefits of keeping ourselves free and clean of nicotine.

This can be the most amazing journey of self-discovery we've ever undertaken IF we keep in mind the reality of recovery - that it is our addiction we are quitting, not ourselves.

JoeJ Free by choosing to NTAP!
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on June 18th, 2012, 10:09 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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saphares
saphares

June 27th, 2007, 11:10 pm #21

I really like the points this chain brings up. I've found 'quit' to be a real misnomer, especially now that I've got the understanding and education. You quit biting your nails....you recover from illnesses.

Stacy - Free and Healing for Sixteen Days, 2 Hours and 7 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 1 Day and 16 Hours, by avoiding the use of 483 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $126.78.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

August 17th, 2007, 7:36 pm #22

This can be the most amazing journey of self-discovery we've ever undertaken IF we keep in mind the reality of recovery - that it is our addiction we are quitting, not ourselves.

Therein lies the Glory of recovery of our true selves.

JoeJ Free by choosing to NTAP for the last 948 days...and a bit more!
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RobinS614
RobinS614

November 17th, 2007, 8:33 pm #23

From above....
Although the word "quitting" is part of the fabric of smoking cessation, if we allow it, it will always carry an image of leaving something behind. When you think of this word I hope you'll ponder when the real quitting took place. We're coming home to the truth about where we've been. Baby steps, patience, and honesty. You'll soon be comfortable engaging all aspects of life without nicotine. You've left absolutely nothing of value behind!
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

January 5th, 2008, 11:23 pm #24

Excerpt from John's above post:

Lost in the world of "nicotine normal," we were each provided a new identity, one that might help us explain why we allowed each and every puff to destroy more air sacs, pump more fats into our arteries and keep us content little slaves.

All the neuro-chemicals that nicotine commanded already belonged to us. We lost none. We've left zeroe behind. Recovery is simply investing the time needed to readjust to again becoming comfortable as us.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

July 19th, 2008, 8:02 pm #25

It's not Quitting so much as Beginning. Beginning and then continuing a process of recovery of your natural-born birthright to live free of the grip of a highly addictive chemical compound, nicotine.

Comfortably adjusted yet never cured. We don't graduate from nicotine's ability to control , we learn how to use our ability to choose to abstain thereby controllin our dependency. Once clean of nicotine we can live at peace with our acquired addiction by ensuring nicotine's absence from our blood chemistry. Simply by declaring a permanent 'cease fire' and NTAP.

Recovering the life you were meant to live, clean of nicotine, is what it is to be truly free.
NTAP, No Nicotine Today - we each are recovering the 'Real Me' a bit more - One Day at a Time.
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