Quitting can be a very lonely experience

Quitting can be a very lonely experience

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

20 Apr 2002, 19:41 #1

Quitting is often a very lonely experience. If you talk to people who quit a long time ago they may make comments like, "quit smoking, there is nothing to it." They may have experienced a difficult time themselves but they could have totally forgotten it. Talk to people who never smoked a day in their life and they can react with comments like, "Hey, you never should have taken up smoking in the first place." Talk to people who still smoke and they may offer you cigarettes. This all can make a person first starting a quit feel like they are alone in the world.

The beauty of Freedom is that you are basically in a group that appreciates the importance of smoking cessation. Some people here have quit at the same time so it is natural that there is a certain camaraderie that is felt for them. But even the longer-term quitters still keep the significance of their quits at a level of paramount importance. They force themselves to remember how hard it was to quit, how bad it was to smoke and how much better off they are because they quit.

Many who are here remember how lonely and hopeless they may have felt in the beginning or in past quits and are eager to help spare others the same feelings of isolation. Their continued participation helps everyone, including themselves maintaining their own resolve to stay quit. So remember your early experiences here and in past quits, and as time goes on you too will be able to share your success to help others.

As you encounter others in your travels through life, let them know there is help out here for them. To help return the support, always be encouraging to people quitting and always make sure they understand to stay off smoking they need to never take another puff!

Joel
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mirigirl (silver)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

20 Apr 2002, 20:47 #2

You are right Joel "Quitting can be a very lonely experience"

And I think that's why I get a bit "clingy" to Freedom at times. Within my immediate family/community I don't know anyone who has quit smoking - no-one!! There is one person I have known in my life who has quit using the patches - that's one! And the only other people I know are AA members who say they have "put it on the programme" i.e. one day at a time-cold turkey.

So I come here for my daily reinforcement of what seems to be the truth for me: Smoking is an addiction and I am a nicotine addict. This really helps to keep me free in a world that seems to think I just had a little habit and surely one won't hurt!

I feel my quit growing in me like a big old oak tree - strong and grounded, and as it grows it gets easier to branch out from time to time. As long as I remember where I come from and who planted the seeds of my freedom, I don't have to feel so lonely anymore. And I can join the ranks of millions of people around the world who are nicotine-free!
Image NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!

yqs mirigirl
another nicotine addict
free and healing
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DubiouslyDos
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

12 Aug 2002, 23:17 #3

I wanted to bring back up this little ditty, to share with our newbies. Part of the process of healing is support and sharing....but the really great thing about Freedom is being able to have the resources to lay down a great foundation for your quit. Lonely it may be in life from time to time....but keeping on track and staying healthy is YOUR responsiblity. Boy is sure took me a while to stop looking to others for the strength and determination I already had inside!

Dos (Dubiously)
10 Weeks 6 Days 18 MinutesImage
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smokefreeJD Gold
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:06

02 May 2003, 20:43 #4

Somehow I stumbled on this thread which I don't think I've read before. This is so true for me since I live alone... I was so worried about quitting because I knew it would be so easy to try to cheat or to give up. Image I needed a support network, especially tough love. If someone just pats my head and says to just get up and try again I will find away to fall again because it's been implanted in my mind that cheating is ok... you just try again. In my heart I knew it wasn't true, that's why this site appealed to me so much. These people were just like me and they were SO serious about quitting. I knew I was home and I knew I wasn't going to be alone.Image

JillImage
Kicking Butt for 6 Months 4 Weeks.
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Madge Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

02 May 2003, 21:53 #5

Thanks, Joel, for recommending this thread. It very reaffirming. Even tho my family is 100% behind me, they don't really understand - they can't. Thank God for Freedom. Education, understanding and companionship certainly help with my quit.

Madge
One month, three weeks, 20 hours, 53 minutes and 35 seconds. 1321 cigarettes not smoked, saving $280.65. Life saved: 4 days, 14 hours, 5 minutes.
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Rickgoldx5
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

02 May 2003, 21:57 #6

ImageYou can't keep it if you don't share it!
Rick
Eleven months, four weeks, 2 hours, 42 minutes and 13 seconds. 29049 cigarettes not smoked, saving $4,343.32. Life saved: 14 weeks, 2 days, 20 hours, 45 minutes.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 May 2003, 21:08 #7

I saw in another thread where a few members felt a real benefit in knowing that they were not alone in the reaction that they were having in their quits. This thread here discusses the phenomena on how quitting in a group can ease some of the fears and lonliness encountered by some people when they are quitting smoking. There is a wide range of feelings that are actually normal reactions to quitting. But normal does not mean that every one gets the specific reactions, just that it is normal for some people to get the reactions.

I sometimes get concerned when a person is having a tough time a few weeks into a quit, comes on board and other members respond that they are having the same reaction and then, sometimes go overboard and say everyone gets these kind of reactions. This can scare people who are first thinking of quitting or just a few days into their quits into thinking that they had better give up now for they begin to think that it is normal that they are going to be having these kind of problems weeks later and they feel that they don't have the fight to get through this extended time period.

So for clarification there are a few points I want to make here. First, the thoughts that can happen are not usually as strong or problematic as the thoughts that people get in the first few days of a quit. Second, is that while some other people may have similar thoughts at some times, that there are also other people who do not and in fact, depending on the reactions involved, it may be that most people are not going to have the same reaction. Normal means things might happen to a few people, not that things will happen to all people.

There is only one thing that is normal and applies to everyone. That is that it is normal to expect to stay permanently in control and smoke free as long as a person sticks with the commitment he or she made to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Oct 2003, 19:23 #8

Yes quitting can be a very lonely experience. But you know what? In today's social climate, smoking can be a very lonely experience too. Being lonely from quitting can last a few days. Being lonely from being one of the only smokers in your family and social network can last a lifetime for a person who does not quit. To spare yourself the physical pain and suffering that goes with being a smoker, as well as the loneliness is as simple as sticking to your commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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Eeyore6083
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

23 Dec 2003, 04:23 #9

Quitting is lonely sometimes Image. I've never read this thread before and it's made me realize that. It helps to view it as that instead of, "what is wrong?"
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valeriescleanGOLD
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

03 May 2004, 03:23 #10

...best lonliness I ever experienced! whyquit.com! WHOOHOO!

Valerie
1 Year and 4 Months I have chosen Freedom!
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