Patience

Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:06

05 Feb 2006, 21:14 #41

My experience so far at 25 days: I need to remember that the occasional longing or blues I feel are part of the emotional loss attached to getting straight from my addiction and not a permanent piece of quitting smoking. With patience, the good times will increase and the blues will diminish, but not disappear completely. Acceptance means they, too, may be an occasional moment of my life. NTAP
Joanne
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Apr 2006, 08:59 #42

After 33 years of active addiction and demanding that my needs must be met....it helps to read this often.
Kat
105 Days Free
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

11 Jun 2006, 09:12 #43

For Kat, who loves this one.

Acknowledge the negative but dwell on the positive is also good to keep in the front of one's mind.
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on 30 Oct 2009, 01:41, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Jun 2006, 10:00 #44

Thanks Sal...however did you know? I decided to reply since this one can never come to the top too often!! I really enjoyed the link
Acknowledge the negative but dwell on the positive . As long as I acknowledge the fact that quitting nicotine was hard for me, that I had some depression, that I felt anger, that time seemed to stand still....I'll never want to go back there again. As for dwelling on the positive; I breathe deep, I feel proud, I feel strong (if I did this I can do anything), I smell better, and I dwell on all of these things every day! All it took was ntap....well, that and this patience thread

Kat
158 Free Days
Last edited by KatieDidIt1999 on 30 Oct 2009, 01:42, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

28 Jun 2006, 20:42 #45

It is so important to remember that this is a healing process. It takes time to re-wire the brain. It takes time to learn to move through our daily lives and routines without relying on a drug. It takes time to educate ourselves and to gain confidence in our ability to succeed.
For today...make a promise to yourself to give time time. Be patient with your healing. Keep reading and learning and trusting us when we say: it will get better!

Parker
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:06

02 Jul 2006, 00:25 #46

I had a vivid smoking dream last night, maybe my first, usually I never remember dreams. I was just walking along somewhere and lit up a cigarette. Took a few drags, im trying to remember if I liked it but cant remember, but I started feeling bad for what I had done, and put it out after a few puffs. But I knew the damage had been done, I had ruined it. My quit was over. All the NTAP motivations had sunk in, I was scared, I blew it and I knew it. I woke up, and really felt like I wanted a smoke, stood there looking around for one thinking about it, it seemed a stronger craving than I'd ever had before. And it kind of shook me a bit, I came right here started reading a bit, and found this thread to give me great calm and strength back. I felt compelled to write this for myself. I don't know if I was being humble enough. I was starting to take for granted I would never smoke again, and I just wanted to give myself a little reminder about complacency and humility. And patience.

I know what ive learned here is true from experience now so I trust you. Im still reading. I realized I havent healed yet, im still healing. My patience is back.. These words sunk in more today than last time. Thank you



I have been quit for 47 days. I have saved $568.69 by not smoking 1,421 cigarettes. I have saved 5 Days of my life.

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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

02 Jul 2006, 04:29 #47

I have been feeling a bit down about my quit over the last few days. I have done over a month and thought I would feel fine by now.

I guess I really needed to read this post - I need PATIENCE. If I take things one day at a time, then one day, I will be a comfortable Ex-smoker.... Feeling better now. How wonderful this place is.

Tina

I have been quit for 1 Month, 6 Days, 23 hours, 58 minutes and 53 seconds (37 days). I have saved £193.79 by not smoking 759 cigarettes. I have saved 2 Days, 15 hours and 15 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 24/05/2006 21:30
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 01:40

02 Jul 2006, 12:04 #48

The past few days have been really hard. I need patience! This was a great post to go over again today.

Kimm - Free and Healing for Eighteen Days, 6 Hours and 4 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 22 Hours, by avoiding the use of 274 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $75.35.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Jul 2006, 07:50 #49

Thanks Roger...this one is always there when I need it most!
From above....."We expect to dance without paying the fiddler. There is no free lunch that is worth while. For us addicts seeking comfort, the price of the fiddler is payed in........ Patience"
Kat
6 months +
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

29 Jul 2006, 10:42 #50

For Tallmama...it's like you said....you can't expect to dispose of a 24 year addiction without some discomfort..:)
Kat
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

11 Sep 2006, 08:52 #51

For George and all the Newbies and not so Newbies

This Thread is pure Gold! Remember to hit the "First" option and read every message.
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:55

18 Oct 2006, 07:06 #52

"Patience" is exactly what I needed to read tonight. I have never been one of my best virtues. Which means that I don't come by it naturally. I used to, but I used most of it up. Oddly enough, since I began my road to freedom, I have been able to muster up much more patience than usual for others. I am so concerned about not inflicting others with what I am experiencing these days that I really go that extra mile to be patient with them. I am maintaining even when there's a whole lot of stupid around me. Furthermore, it feels good! It's becoming a wonderful learning experience for me. I do have the ability! Now, I think that I need to find a way to give some of that to myself and my recovery. Time to show myself some of the same consideration as I would to others? Hmmm.....

I have been quit for 1 Week, 4 Days, 22 hours, 5 minutes and 37 seconds (11 days). I have saved $52.13 by not smoking 298 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Day and 50 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 10/5/2006 9:00 PM
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Dec 2006, 01:08 #53

Thank you Roger,

I'm a newbie and was feeling a bit down today, for the first time.

Very grateful to have read such an insightful piece of writing - it helped a lot.

Sharon x

I have been quit for 1 Week, 6 Days, 10 hours, 14 minutes and 27 seconds (13 days). I have saved £40.27 by not smoking 201 cigarettes. I have saved 16 hours and 45 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 04/12/2006 07:54
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

05 Jan 2007, 01:06 #54

It is so important to remember that this is a healing process. It takes time to re-wire the brain. It takes time to learn to move through our daily lives and routines without relying on a drug. It takes time to educate ourselves and to gain confidence in our ability to succeed. For today...make a promise to yourself to give time time. Be patient with your healing. Keep reading and learning and trusting us when we say: it will get better!


Parker
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on 22 Jul 2009, 03:29, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 May 2007, 09:27 #55

For anyone out there that thinks the craves should be gone by now!!
Kat
31 years of active addiction
1 year, 4 months free
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:27

20 Sep 2007, 00:57 #56

Wow!! That is awesome. This is just what I needed to read today. I can use this in all aspects of my life. Terrific!


Kim,

3 Weeks 1 day and 56 minutes
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

20 Oct 2007, 07:44 #57

My favorite post from Roger can never come to the top too often. My favorite part from above is

"We expect to dance without paying the fiddler. There is no free lunch that is worth while. For us addicts seeking comfort, the price of the fiddler is payed in........ Patience".

And it surely does pay off!

Kat
1 year, 9 months free
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Nov 2007, 20:43 #58

Patience!
Last edited by John (Gold) on 22 Jul 2009, 03:30, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

01 Jan 2008, 00:52 #59

It is very important to realize to successfully quit smoking and gain control over your addiciton you don't need an immeasurable amount of patience or an impeccable possitive attitude. These personal traits will develop as your quit progresses. All you need is a desire to quit and a set time to do it. Once you have decided on the two, place them in motion, all you ever have to do to remain nicotine free is never violate the Law of Addiction....Never Take Another Puff!
Roger
Freedom's Gold Club
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

16 Feb 2008, 15:05 #60

Roger wrote this almost 5 years ago. Timeless gift to thousands upon thousands.
A person can increase the level of their patience by doing the following.
Pursue your quit one day at a time. Take baby steps.
Consider each day a gift of life that will allow you one step closer to your goal of being a comfortable x-smoker.
Confront your fears about attaining your goal. Remember the world was not created in a day. Beautiful symphonies, works of art, literary masterpieces and your control of your addiction will not be created in a day.
Remember a lifetime is not lived in a day or week or month. It is a journey we should savor one day at a time.
Always look for tomorrow to be the first day of the rest of your life.
It is very important to realize to successfully quit smoking and gain control over your addiciton you don't need an immeasurable amount of patience or an impeccable possitive attitude. These personal traits will develop as your quit progresses. All you need is a desire to quit and a set time to do it. Once you have decided on the two, place them in motion, all you ever have to do to remain nicotine free is never violate the Law of Addiction....Never Take Another Puff!
Roger
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:10

16 Feb 2008, 22:55 #61

Hi Rodger, I am new to the site. Just about a week or so. I hav'nt had a cigarette for 11 days. Thanks for the post on patience. I am so hard on myself. I must remember to read and get knowledge from people like yourself who have reached some understanding as to what nicotine can do to our bodies. I will take your advise and learn more about how to be more patient. I just love this site. Thank again, Gilda.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

24 Sep 2008, 09:04 #62

I always seem to find what I need here on the forum just when I need it.
Sid 38 days quit.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

03 Nov 2008, 01:24 #63

I've printed this out to read daily. Thank you!

Jenn
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Joined: 13 Sep 2009, 09:34

22 Sep 2009, 19:21 #64

Roger (Gold) wrote:
Our society we live in today ranges from instant breakfasts and beyond. Then gives way to instant messages being transmitted around the globe in less than seconds. We have become a society that demands everything to be fast and easy. For the most part this is a good possitive technological advancement. It should give us more time to pursue our goals and happiness as we journey through life.
On the downside we are becoming a world of "I want it now." The same holds true with many nicotine addicts on the road to recovery or wanting to quit smoking and stop feeding their addiction. Many search for the easy way out. Others don't understand why comfort takes time to happen. Perhaps, to many of us have not had to struggle for much in our lives. Everything has come to us far too easy! We expect to dance without paying the fiddler. There is no free lunch that is worth while. For us addicts seeking comfort, the price of the fiddler is payed in........
Patience
So just what is patience? It is many things combined to form one thing. It is an elusive virtue we all have within ourselves but never learn how to use it or just simply don't want to learn how to harness it.
Patience is the ability to:
Sit back and wait for an expected outcome without experiencing anxiety, tension or frustration.
Let go of your need or demand for instant gratification.
Believe in the concepts of permanence and comittment.
The ability to maintain your calmness and consideration as you handle your growth issues one at a time.
Hang on to your quit when unexpected trouble arrises that may take 3 or 4 minutes to allow a crave or trigger to pass.
Accept the non-enthusiastic reception of others to share in your new found truths you have learned at Freedom.
See that overnight reformations are rarely long lasting in the begining and that gradual change and growth have a greater lasting durability.
Accept the universal truth that your quit, like life itself, is a journey not an instant destination.
_______________________________________
Moving on to the other side of the coin, there are negative impacts with being impatient.
By being impatient you can:
Waste your energy worrying aboout how slow things are changing instead of directing that energy towards the changes you desire.
Ignore all the possitive gains accomplished on your road to your freedom, recovery and growth, allowing you to only concentrate on what you have not yet recieved or accomplished.
Become pessimistic about your quit seeing only the "half empty cup" rather the "half filled cup."
Become overwhelmed by your slower than anticipated progress and begin to lose the hope and motivation to keep on trying.
________________________________
A person can increase the level of their patience by doing the following.
Pursue your quit one day at a time. Take baby steps.
Consider each day a gift of life that will allow you one step closer to your goal of being a comfortable x-smoker.
Confront your fears about attaining your goal. Remember the world was not created in a day. Beautiful symphonies, works of art, literary masterpieces and your control of your addiction will not be created in a day.
Remember a lifetime is not lived in a day or week or month. It is a journey we should savor one day at a time.
Always look for tomorrow to be the first day of the rest of your life.
It is very important to realize to successfully quit smoking and gain control over your addiciton you don't need an immeasurable amount of patience or an impeccable possitive attitude. These personal traits will develop as your quit progresses. All you need is a desire to quit and a set time to do it. Once you have decided on the two, place them in motion, all you ever have to do to remain nicotine free is never violate the Law of Addiction....Never Take Another Puff!
Roger
Freedom's Gold Club
P.S. It keeps getting better, a little bit, each and every day! :)
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Joined: 17 Aug 2010, 16:35

23 Sep 2010, 14:56 #65

I especially warm to the remark that we need to even be patient in our efforts to cultivate a golden Positive Mental Attitude. We do as we can, when we can, at the start--and sometimes that means getting by with a less than perfect attitude!
Gratefully Gold

I escaped from the prison of smoking on August 14, 2010.  
[font]The best revenge is quitting well![/font] 
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