Parker GOLD
Parker GOLD

October 10th, 2004, 10:32 pm #31

"Up ahead is a deep, rich sense of inner quiet and calm where the constant chatter of addiction is just a memory."
John wrote this in response to someone else's post. I wanted to capture it here. For this is what patience will bring you.
Parker - 28 months
Last edited by Parker GOLD on July 22nd, 2009, 3:09 am, edited 1 time in total.
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gold osomashi
gold osomashi

October 23rd, 2004, 3:24 pm #32

Thank you everyone on this string. Your words on patience are powerful and I am finding great solace in them. I'll keep this one on my speed dial. Thank you.
mari 1 month and 2 weeks
Last edited by gold osomashi on July 22nd, 2009, 3:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
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cac
cac

October 24th, 2004, 9:30 am #33

This is exactly what I need to read, daily, for a while. I have copied it and will post it by my desk.

I think that after over 2 decades of instant "aaah" gratification and feeding that jones now (because my body says "NOW!") has indeed modified my behavior. When there is nothing to do "NOW!" anymore, I feel more jittery even though I am weeks away from the physical effects of nicotine withdrawl . I have nothing to be compulsive about anymore. I don't know what to do with myself and I have long forgotten how to "just be". "Just being" brings calmness and I have to teach myself how to "just be" again.

Perhaps for the next week (through greening!) I will say "NTAP and just be".

-Cate
Nicotine free for 3 Weeks, 3 Days, 12 hours and 16 minutes (24 days). $48.04 goes to the free me fund. By not smoking 171 cigarettes, I have saved 14 hours and 15 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 9/29/2004
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

December 4th, 2004, 2:09 am #34



Baby steps, patience, just one day at a time!

There's no place like home!

This can be one of the most eye-opening and wonderful adventures we'll ever take if we'll only remain patient and allow ourselves to see the peddles of the beautiful rose unfolding before our very eyes.

The real quitting took place the day that nicotine assumed control over the flow of more than 200 neurochemials inside your body. You're not quitting you but recovering you! You're going home and you've always had the ability to do so. There's only one rule to again awaking someday soon to a re-newed expectation of going your entire day without once wanting for nicotine ... no nicotine today!!
Last edited by John (Gold) on July 22nd, 2009, 3:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

February 3rd, 2005, 1:57 am #35

OMG, just had a moment when I clicked a link suggestion from (I think) Kay! This is now added to my IE Favorites in the Freedom folder. Thanks you to Roger et al. who have added to this string. Just what I need to read cause I have so little. Patience that is. "And Just BE" JoeJFree - a nicotine addict Free and Healing for Twenty Three Days, 2 Hours and 42 Minutes
I've saved 2 days and 9 minutes of my life.
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on July 22nd, 2009, 3:38 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Parker GOLD
Parker GOLD

March 3rd, 2005, 10:25 pm #36

This is such an important thread. Not so much for those in the first couple of weeks. Everyone seems to expect that the initial days of quitting will not be a piece of cake. They expect to work hard and know they will have to deal with withdrawal and craves. However, sometimes folks get into the third or fourth weeks and beyond and they seem to get blindsided by the desire to smoke. It is so important to remember that this is a healing process. It takes time to re-wire the brain. It takes time to learn to move through our daily lives and routines without relying on a drug. It takes time to educate ourselves and to gain confidence in our ability to succeed.

For today...make a promise to yourself to give time time. Be patient with your healing. Keep reading and learning and trusting us when we say: it will get better!

Parker - feeling grateful for 32 months of freedom & healing
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

April 25th, 2005, 8:16 am #37

From: Parker - GOLD! Sent: 3/17/2003 8:11 AM
Roger, as usual I read your words and experience them as a gift. What an important message. Developing comfort is simply a matter of time. For me, going back and reading old posts helped me gain a sense of perspective which helped me be more patient with my progress. Reading about how the bronzes and silvers and golds had done some struggling in the early days let me know that I was not unusual so I couldn't use my specialness as an excuse for relapse!

(Bedrock truth learned here at Freedom: there is no excuse for relapse!)

Give time time. I used to say to myself: "look you smoked for 32 years, don't you think you can give this quit another day and see how you feel?" I am deeply grateful that I waited to see how the next day would feel. Because here I sit at 283 days feeling very comfortable and proud of myself and free......

Thank you, Roger.

Parker

And thank you Parker and all the other Oldbies who have broken trail for those of us just discoveing this path to comfortable Freedom of Mind.
The Song Remains the Same

JoeJ Day 104 along the Path. NTAP!
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Parker GOLD
Parker GOLD

June 2nd, 2005, 8:39 am #38

A Freedom saying not used as much around here anymore....."I'd rather be an ex-smoker with an occasional thought of smoking than a smoker obsessed with quitting."

With time, with patience, with education, and the occasional tooth-gritting-determination-to-stay-quit-for-just-one-more-day-darn-it! comfort does come.

Trust us....it does.

Parker - 35 months
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

November 7th, 2005, 8:21 pm #39



My name is JoeJFree always a nicotine addict and gratefully now an X-smoker for 9 months, 27 days, 21 hours and 6 minutes (300 days)

I've now reclaimed 26 Days and 2 Hours to live life as I choose! NTAP!
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on July 22nd, 2009, 3:22 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

January 25th, 2006, 6:18 am #40



Consider each day a gift of life that will allow you one step
closer to your goal of being a comfortable x-smoker.
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on July 22nd, 2009, 3:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
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FoolishWorkinj
FoolishWorkinj

February 5th, 2006, 9:14 pm #41

My experience so far at 25 days: I need to remember that the occasional longing or blues I feel are part of the emotional loss attached to getting straight from my addiction and not a permanent piece of quitting smoking. With patience, the good times will increase and the blues will diminish, but not disappear completely. Acceptance means they, too, may be an occasional moment of my life. NTAP
Joanne
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KatieDidIt1999
KatieDidIt1999

April 18th, 2006, 8:59 am #42

After 33 years of active addiction and demanding that my needs must be met....it helps to read this often.
Kat
105 Days Free
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

June 11th, 2006, 9:12 am #43

For Kat, who loves this one.

Acknowledge the negative but dwell on the positive is also good to keep in the front of one's mind.
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on October 30th, 2009, 1:41 am, edited 1 time in total.
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KatieDidIt1999
KatieDidIt1999

June 11th, 2006, 10:00 am #44

Thanks Sal...however did you know? I decided to reply since this one can never come to the top too often!! I really enjoyed the link
Acknowledge the negative but dwell on the positive . As long as I acknowledge the fact that quitting nicotine was hard for me, that I had some depression, that I felt anger, that time seemed to stand still....I'll never want to go back there again. As for dwelling on the positive; I breathe deep, I feel proud, I feel strong (if I did this I can do anything), I smell better, and I dwell on all of these things every day! All it took was ntap....well, that and this patience thread

Kat
158 Free Days
Last edited by KatieDidIt1999 on October 30th, 2009, 1:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

June 28th, 2006, 8:42 pm #45

It is so important to remember that this is a healing process. It takes time to re-wire the brain. It takes time to learn to move through our daily lives and routines without relying on a drug. It takes time to educate ourselves and to gain confidence in our ability to succeed.
For today...make a promise to yourself to give time time. Be patient with your healing. Keep reading and learning and trusting us when we say: it will get better!

Parker
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thinkwild
thinkwild

July 2nd, 2006, 12:25 am #46

I had a vivid smoking dream last night, maybe my first, usually I never remember dreams. I was just walking along somewhere and lit up a cigarette. Took a few drags, im trying to remember if I liked it but cant remember, but I started feeling bad for what I had done, and put it out after a few puffs. But I knew the damage had been done, I had ruined it. My quit was over. All the NTAP motivations had sunk in, I was scared, I blew it and I knew it. I woke up, and really felt like I wanted a smoke, stood there looking around for one thinking about it, it seemed a stronger craving than I'd ever had before. And it kind of shook me a bit, I came right here started reading a bit, and found this thread to give me great calm and strength back. I felt compelled to write this for myself. I don't know if I was being humble enough. I was starting to take for granted I would never smoke again, and I just wanted to give myself a little reminder about complacency and humility. And patience.

I know what ive learned here is true from experience now so I trust you. Im still reading. I realized I havent healed yet, im still healing. My patience is back.. These words sunk in more today than last time. Thank you



I have been quit for 47 days. I have saved $568.69 by not smoking 1,421 cigarettes. I have saved 5 Days of my life.

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TinaLEM1
TinaLEM1

July 2nd, 2006, 4:29 am #47

I have been feeling a bit down about my quit over the last few days. I have done over a month and thought I would feel fine by now.

I guess I really needed to read this post - I need PATIENCE. If I take things one day at a time, then one day, I will be a comfortable Ex-smoker.... Feeling better now. How wonderful this place is.

Tina

I have been quit for 1 Month, 6 Days, 23 hours, 58 minutes and 53 seconds (37 days). I have saved £193.79 by not smoking 759 cigarettes. I have saved 2 Days, 15 hours and 15 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 24/05/2006 21:30
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MomTo5Girls
MomTo5Girls

July 2nd, 2006, 12:04 pm #48

The past few days have been really hard. I need patience! This was a great post to go over again today.

Kimm - Free and Healing for Eighteen Days, 6 Hours and 4 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 22 Hours, by avoiding the use of 274 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $75.35.
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KatieDidIt1999
KatieDidIt1999

July 12th, 2006, 7:50 am #49

Thanks Roger...this one is always there when I need it most!
From above....."We expect to dance without paying the fiddler. There is no free lunch that is worth while. For us addicts seeking comfort, the price of the fiddler is payed in........ Patience"
Kat
6 months +
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KatieDidIt1999
KatieDidIt1999

July 29th, 2006, 10:42 am #50

For Tallmama...it's like you said....you can't expect to dispose of a 24 year addiction without some discomfort..:)
Kat
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AussieJo7.ffn
AussieJo7.ffn

September 11th, 2006, 8:52 am #51

For George and all the Newbies and not so Newbies

This Thread is pure Gold! Remember to hit the "First" option and read every message.
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nailteach
nailteach

October 18th, 2006, 7:06 am #52

"Patience" is exactly what I needed to read tonight. I have never been one of my best virtues. Which means that I don't come by it naturally. I used to, but I used most of it up. Oddly enough, since I began my road to freedom, I have been able to muster up much more patience than usual for others. I am so concerned about not inflicting others with what I am experiencing these days that I really go that extra mile to be patient with them. I am maintaining even when there's a whole lot of stupid around me. Furthermore, it feels good! It's becoming a wonderful learning experience for me. I do have the ability! Now, I think that I need to find a way to give some of that to myself and my recovery. Time to show myself some of the same consideration as I would to others? Hmmm.....

I have been quit for 1 Week, 4 Days, 22 hours, 5 minutes and 37 seconds (11 days). I have saved $52.13 by not smoking 298 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Day and 50 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 10/5/2006 9:00 PM
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Sharry
Sharry

December 18th, 2006, 1:08 am #53

Thank you Roger,

I'm a newbie and was feeling a bit down today, for the first time.

Very grateful to have read such an insightful piece of writing - it helped a lot.

Sharon x

I have been quit for 1 Week, 6 Days, 10 hours, 14 minutes and 27 seconds (13 days). I have saved £40.27 by not smoking 201 cigarettes. I have saved 16 hours and 45 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 04/12/2006 07:54
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

January 5th, 2007, 1:06 am #54

It is so important to remember that this is a healing process. It takes time to re-wire the brain. It takes time to learn to move through our daily lives and routines without relying on a drug. It takes time to educate ourselves and to gain confidence in our ability to succeed. For today...make a promise to yourself to give time time. Be patient with your healing. Keep reading and learning and trusting us when we say: it will get better!


Parker
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on July 22nd, 2009, 3:29 am, edited 1 time in total.
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KatieDidIt1999
KatieDidIt1999

May 15th, 2007, 9:27 am #55

For anyone out there that thinks the craves should be gone by now!!
Kat
31 years of active addiction
1 year, 4 months free
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