John (Gold)
John (Gold)

December 24th, 2003, 8:41 pm #21



Allow Impatience to Meet Patience


Last edited by John (Gold) on July 22nd, 2009, 2:55 am, edited 1 time in total.
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wackylaurie
wackylaurie

January 28th, 2004, 1:34 am #22

Hi Roger!
This is one of my favorite threads. It is so very true.
Every one have a great day and enjoy this wonderful journey we are on!
Laurie
I have chosen not to smoke for 3 Weeks 5 Days 9 Hours 37 Minutes 28 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 844. Money saved: $105.60.
Last edited by wackylaurie on July 22nd, 2009, 2:57 am, edited 1 time in total.
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dancebear37
dancebear37

February 3rd, 2004, 9:31 am #23

Very well put.
Last edited by dancebear37 on July 22nd, 2009, 2:58 am, edited 1 time in total.
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smurfetteirl
smurfetteirl

March 27th, 2004, 12:42 am #24

what an excellent post, just what this smurf needs to hear right now, thanks roger............golden wisdom
Last edited by smurfetteirl on July 22nd, 2009, 3:01 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Roger (Gold)
Roger (Gold)

April 11th, 2004, 1:18 pm #25

Many equate patience to a long term solution. For the addict in withdrawal or in the middle of a temporary period of adjustment we term "quitting", Patience can and should be measured in smaller increments. We know you have the patience to manage your next 3 -5 minute crave episode.
One Crave At A Time
Last edited by Roger (Gold) on July 22nd, 2009, 3:01 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Kellangel
Kellangel

May 1st, 2004, 5:29 am #26

What a wonderful thread!

Thank you so much roger from a newbie.
Last edited by Kellangel on July 22nd, 2009, 3:03 am, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

June 8th, 2004, 1:27 am #27

Baby steps, patience, just one day at a time!

There's no place like home!
Last edited by John (Gold) on July 22nd, 2009, 3:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Parker GOLD
Parker GOLD

June 12th, 2004, 2:42 am #28

Dear Newbies, 5 days or 10 days or even 20 days into your quit is not how it will always feel. Be patient with the process. Read, read, read. Everything you are experiencing has been felt here before. You will begin to feel comfortable in your own skin. Your days and routines will normalize. Give it time. I promise comfort will come.


Parker - 2 years
Last edited by Parker GOLD on July 22nd, 2009, 3:06 am, edited 1 time in total.
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AidaSaba1
AidaSaba1

July 30th, 2004, 6:52 am #29

You give us hope. Thank you. I am determined never to take another puff for as long as I live. But, I have also resigned to the fact that perhaps I will struggle my addiction to nicotine for the rest of my life. At least this is how i feel . I must confess that I do miss having a cigarette with a glass of wine. It was a wonderful combination. I miss that every day. Not one day passes since my quit where I did not have to go jogging or call somebody over the telephone, or simply clean my kitchen floor like a maniac, in order to discard of that "missing" my "end-of-the-day" smoking a few cigarettes with a nice glass of wine.
I don't even call it an urge, it is really more like "I miss that time".

I have printed your post and have posted it on the wall in my office. Everytime I "miss" having a cigarette at the end of the day, I read it over and over again. Thank you again for a very beneficial post.

Aida
Shockingly free for 1 month, 2 weeks, 1 day and 18 hours. I have not smoked a staggering number of cigarettes (1,602 cigarettes sufficient to fill my lungs with half-a glass full of black tar). I saved $448.69 and added 5days and 13 hours to my life span.
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kattatonic1 gold4
kattatonic1 gold4

August 8th, 2004, 7:59 pm #30

Roger, is it time to write Part 2 of the Patience thread ~ you know, about Stage 2? Your Patience post really made a big difference to me early in my quit. I mean really, really made a big difference to me.
Now that I am so far into my quit, I notice a very funny thing happening here. I am absolutely full of patience for all sorts of things. Some of it might be the contribution of my "practising" patience, but I was only practising it to make it through triggers and the like. Now it has permeated here, there and everywhere in my life! Could it be that I was always so wound up waiting for my next "fix" or searching for the opportunity for my next fix, that I had taught myself to be impatient all over the place, here, there and everywhere? Could it be that comfort has been sneaking around and seeping into all different aspects of my life and making me patient!? Holy cow!
~ Kay ~
Celebrating 7.5 months of Freedom~!
Last edited by kattatonic1 gold4 on July 22nd, 2009, 3:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Parker GOLD
Parker GOLD

October 10th, 2004, 10:32 pm #31

"Up ahead is a deep, rich sense of inner quiet and calm where the constant chatter of addiction is just a memory."
John wrote this in response to someone else's post. I wanted to capture it here. For this is what patience will bring you.
Parker - 28 months
Last edited by Parker GOLD on July 22nd, 2009, 3:09 am, edited 1 time in total.
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gold osomashi
gold osomashi

October 23rd, 2004, 3:24 pm #32

Thank you everyone on this string. Your words on patience are powerful and I am finding great solace in them. I'll keep this one on my speed dial. Thank you.
mari 1 month and 2 weeks
Last edited by gold osomashi on July 22nd, 2009, 3:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
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cac
cac

October 24th, 2004, 9:30 am #33

This is exactly what I need to read, daily, for a while. I have copied it and will post it by my desk.

I think that after over 2 decades of instant "aaah" gratification and feeding that jones now (because my body says "NOW!") has indeed modified my behavior. When there is nothing to do "NOW!" anymore, I feel more jittery even though I am weeks away from the physical effects of nicotine withdrawl . I have nothing to be compulsive about anymore. I don't know what to do with myself and I have long forgotten how to "just be". "Just being" brings calmness and I have to teach myself how to "just be" again.

Perhaps for the next week (through greening!) I will say "NTAP and just be".

-Cate
Nicotine free for 3 Weeks, 3 Days, 12 hours and 16 minutes (24 days). $48.04 goes to the free me fund. By not smoking 171 cigarettes, I have saved 14 hours and 15 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 9/29/2004
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

December 4th, 2004, 2:09 am #34



Baby steps, patience, just one day at a time!

There's no place like home!

This can be one of the most eye-opening and wonderful adventures we'll ever take if we'll only remain patient and allow ourselves to see the peddles of the beautiful rose unfolding before our very eyes.

The real quitting took place the day that nicotine assumed control over the flow of more than 200 neurochemials inside your body. You're not quitting you but recovering you! You're going home and you've always had the ability to do so. There's only one rule to again awaking someday soon to a re-newed expectation of going your entire day without once wanting for nicotine ... no nicotine today!!
Last edited by John (Gold) on July 22nd, 2009, 3:20 am, edited 1 time in total.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

February 3rd, 2005, 1:57 am #35

OMG, just had a moment when I clicked a link suggestion from (I think) Kay! This is now added to my IE Favorites in the Freedom folder. Thanks you to Roger et al. who have added to this string. Just what I need to read cause I have so little. Patience that is. "And Just BE" JoeJFree - a nicotine addict Free and Healing for Twenty Three Days, 2 Hours and 42 Minutes
I've saved 2 days and 9 minutes of my life.
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on July 22nd, 2009, 3:38 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Parker GOLD
Parker GOLD

March 3rd, 2005, 10:25 pm #36

This is such an important thread. Not so much for those in the first couple of weeks. Everyone seems to expect that the initial days of quitting will not be a piece of cake. They expect to work hard and know they will have to deal with withdrawal and craves. However, sometimes folks get into the third or fourth weeks and beyond and they seem to get blindsided by the desire to smoke. It is so important to remember that this is a healing process. It takes time to re-wire the brain. It takes time to learn to move through our daily lives and routines without relying on a drug. It takes time to educate ourselves and to gain confidence in our ability to succeed.

For today...make a promise to yourself to give time time. Be patient with your healing. Keep reading and learning and trusting us when we say: it will get better!

Parker - feeling grateful for 32 months of freedom & healing
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

April 25th, 2005, 8:16 am #37

From: Parker - GOLD! Sent: 3/17/2003 8:11 AM
Roger, as usual I read your words and experience them as a gift. What an important message. Developing comfort is simply a matter of time. For me, going back and reading old posts helped me gain a sense of perspective which helped me be more patient with my progress. Reading about how the bronzes and silvers and golds had done some struggling in the early days let me know that I was not unusual so I couldn't use my specialness as an excuse for relapse!

(Bedrock truth learned here at Freedom: there is no excuse for relapse!)

Give time time. I used to say to myself: "look you smoked for 32 years, don't you think you can give this quit another day and see how you feel?" I am deeply grateful that I waited to see how the next day would feel. Because here I sit at 283 days feeling very comfortable and proud of myself and free......

Thank you, Roger.

Parker

And thank you Parker and all the other Oldbies who have broken trail for those of us just discoveing this path to comfortable Freedom of Mind.
The Song Remains the Same

JoeJ Day 104 along the Path. NTAP!
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Parker GOLD
Parker GOLD

June 2nd, 2005, 8:39 am #38

A Freedom saying not used as much around here anymore....."I'd rather be an ex-smoker with an occasional thought of smoking than a smoker obsessed with quitting."

With time, with patience, with education, and the occasional tooth-gritting-determination-to-stay-quit-for-just-one-more-day-darn-it! comfort does come.

Trust us....it does.

Parker - 35 months
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

November 7th, 2005, 8:21 pm #39



My name is JoeJFree always a nicotine addict and gratefully now an X-smoker for 9 months, 27 days, 21 hours and 6 minutes (300 days)

I've now reclaimed 26 Days and 2 Hours to live life as I choose! NTAP!
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on July 22nd, 2009, 3:22 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

January 25th, 2006, 6:18 am #40



Consider each day a gift of life that will allow you one step
closer to your goal of being a comfortable x-smoker.
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on July 22nd, 2009, 3:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
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FoolishWorkinj
FoolishWorkinj

February 5th, 2006, 9:14 pm #41

My experience so far at 25 days: I need to remember that the occasional longing or blues I feel are part of the emotional loss attached to getting straight from my addiction and not a permanent piece of quitting smoking. With patience, the good times will increase and the blues will diminish, but not disappear completely. Acceptance means they, too, may be an occasional moment of my life. NTAP
Joanne
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KatieDidIt1999
KatieDidIt1999

April 18th, 2006, 8:59 am #42

After 33 years of active addiction and demanding that my needs must be met....it helps to read this often.
Kat
105 Days Free
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

June 11th, 2006, 9:12 am #43

For Kat, who loves this one.

Acknowledge the negative but dwell on the positive is also good to keep in the front of one's mind.
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on October 30th, 2009, 1:41 am, edited 1 time in total.
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KatieDidIt1999
KatieDidIt1999

June 11th, 2006, 10:00 am #44

Thanks Sal...however did you know? I decided to reply since this one can never come to the top too often!! I really enjoyed the link
Acknowledge the negative but dwell on the positive . As long as I acknowledge the fact that quitting nicotine was hard for me, that I had some depression, that I felt anger, that time seemed to stand still....I'll never want to go back there again. As for dwelling on the positive; I breathe deep, I feel proud, I feel strong (if I did this I can do anything), I smell better, and I dwell on all of these things every day! All it took was ntap....well, that and this patience thread

Kat
158 Free Days
Last edited by KatieDidIt1999 on October 30th, 2009, 1:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

June 28th, 2006, 8:42 pm #45

It is so important to remember that this is a healing process. It takes time to re-wire the brain. It takes time to learn to move through our daily lives and routines without relying on a drug. It takes time to educate ourselves and to gain confidence in our ability to succeed.
For today...make a promise to yourself to give time time. Be patient with your healing. Keep reading and learning and trusting us when we say: it will get better!

Parker
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