Past FAILURES

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

16 Oct 2003, 18:49 #21

Image Quitting is truly a fight for your health and your life. As long as you never lose sight of this and you will always stay motivated to stick to your commitment to never take another puff! Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

13 Nov 2003, 19:42 #22

The Law of Addiction
Administration of a drug to an addict will cause reestablishment of chemical dependence upon the addictive substance.

Freedom's Relapse Policy
Freedom's relapse policy is simple. Once we understand the Law of Addiction it deprives us of any legitimate excuse for relapse. Any member who relapses shall permanently lose posting privileges.
NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF


Quitting is truly a fight for your health and your life. As long as you never lose sight of this and you will always stay motivated to stick to your commitment to never take another puff!



Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Dec 2003, 21:06 #23

I've noticed a number of new members mentioning that they have had numerous quits in the past that didn't stick. I thought this is an important article for these people to read highlighting the fact that quitting is not a process that you want to repeat over and over again. This quit will stick as long as you stay totally committed this time to never take another puff!
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

18 Jan 2004, 05:41 #24

From: Joel Sent: 12/15/2003 8:06 AM
I've noticed a number of new members mentioning that they have had numerous quits in the past that didn't stick. I thought this is an important article for these people to read highlighting the fact that quitting is not a process that you want to repeat over and over again. This quit will stick as long as you stay totally committed this time to never take another puff!
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Nov 2005, 06:23 #25

A member just put up a post in which she mentioned that she was a little skeptical of a friends motivation to quit because he was putting off the date. This letter expresses how I too have felt that same skepticism, although there are time when people will surprise you. Unfortunately, as this story illustrates, delaying tactics sometimes results tragic results:

John explained this to me, and promised he would return again one day when things would be better.
Well, I have heard this hundreds of times before, and while occasionally people do return, it is not the majority and probably not even a significantly high percentage. Being that I was having 50 or more people at a time in these clinics, I couldn't spend much time dealing with those who were not quitting.

Three year later John does return to the clinic and does quit smoking. He did great his second time around. Not only did he quit, but he became a regular volunteer for me, coming to many clinics as a panelist to help people first quitting. He also sent in lots of people, probably 15 to 20 over the next couple of years.

About three years after John's quit, he was going in for a physical and to his surprise there was a small spot on his chest x-ray. When it was biopsied they found out John had cancer. He was about 48 at the time, in the peak of his career, still had children of school age and now was facing this terrible diagnosis. It was a horrible shock to many people. As is often the case with lung cancer, it was a fast deterioration. Within a year and a half John had succumbed to the disease.

I went to John's funeral--it was huge. There were hundreds and hundreds of people there. Many I knew, some because of their high public profile, but more because John had sent in so many people to the clinic in the time period that he was off smoking. Even after the diagnosis he was still sending people in.

One of the men there was from one of the recent clinics and had told me how tragic this was that John had lost his life and how his lost quit was probably the reason. To be realistic I told him that it is possible that if John had quit the first time in the clinic it may not have made a difference. He basically found out he had lung cancer three years after he quit, and that lung cancer could be present for 5 years or even 10 years without presenting symptoms or even showing up on the x-ray. Being that the day I met him was about 6 years before the diagnosis, it was not totally improbable that at that time the cancer had already been initiated and was silently growing.

The man then proceeded to tell me that my clinic was not the first clinic John had tried. That in fact, 10 years before joining that first group with me, he and John had gone to another local clinic together to quit and both in a matter of days wrote it off as a bad time to quit--but knew they would both quit again one day.

Well John was right, he did eventually quit again one day. But it turned out to be over 16 years later. Now the odds were quite different--if he had quit that first time around he probably would never had developed the disease that ultimately cost him his life.

The lesson here needs to be once you have a quit going, do everything in your power to make it last. While you are seeing people come back who just seem to be quitting again, if you relapse you just don't know you will ever get the strength or desire to quit again, and that even if you do, you don't know whether something won't go wrong in the interim period before the next quit.

John is not the only person I know who fits this profile--I know lots of them--people who could have had extra years and extra decades who lost them by minimizing the implications of not quitting or of relapsing. Once you have a quit smoking, understand your very life is contingent on understanding the importance of knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 May 2006, 21:06 #26

I originally wrote this article before we had our current relapse policy at Freedom. People cannot relapse and simply join back up at Freedom now. All a relapsed person can do is read what we have to offer. This may not be such a bad thing though--there is a pretty good chance that if the relapsed member had spent his or her time reading the first time around he or she would never have relapsed.

The example in this story is still an important one, hitting home the point the importance of making this quit continue to succeed by simply sticking to the personal commitment you made when you joined up at Freedom to never take another puff.

Joel
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Gold Massabe2006
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 May 2006, 21:22 #27

Joel,

Thankyou so much for this wonderful website and your insightful and motivational articles. Having just read this about quitting too late, it only re-enforces my committment to quit. I can only prey that it is not to late but know that I read your articles everyday and they give me a renewed strentgh to stay with my quit.

Thankyou,

Dave - Free and Healing for Fifteen Days, 11 Hours and 21 Minutes after 20 years as a nicotine addict. I have extended my life expectancy 1 Day and 1 Hour, by avoiding the use of nicotine 309 times that would have cost me $54.19.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Jul 2006, 21:36 #28

I saw where the term "practice quits" was referred to on the board. Didn't want any members to get the idea that there is a "practice quit" option here at Freedom. As it says above:

I originally wrote this article before we had our current relapse policy at Freedom. People cannot relapse and simply join back up at Freedom now. All a relapsed person can do is read what we have to offer. This may not be such a bad thing though--there is a pretty good chance that if the relapsed member had spent his or her time reading the first time around he or she would never have relapsed.

The example in this story is still an important one, hitting home the point the importance of making this quit continue to succeed by simply sticking to the personal commitment you made when you joined up at Freedom to never take another puff.

Joel
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Feb 2007, 18:04 #29

From above:

A member just put up a post in which she mentioned that she was a little skeptical of a friends motivation to quit because he was putting off the date. This letter expresses how I too have felt that same skepticism, although there are time when people will surprise you. Unfortunately, as this story illustrates, delaying tactics sometimes results tragic results:

John explained this to me, and promised he would return again one day when things would be better.

Well, I have heard this hundreds of times before, and while occasionally people do return, it is not the majority and probably not even a significantly high percentage. Being that I was having 50 or more people at a time in these clinics, I couldn't spend much time dealing with those who were not quitting.

Three year later John does return to the clinic and does quit smoking. He did great his second time around. Not only did he quit, but he became a regular volunteer for me, coming to many clinics as a panelist to help people first quitting. He also sent in lots of people, probably 15 to 20 over the next couple of years.

About three years after John's quit, he was going in for a physical and to his surprise there was a small spot on his chest x-ray. When it was biopsied they found out John had cancer. He was about 48 at the time, in the peak of his career, still had children of school age and now was facing this terrible diagnosis. It was a horrible shock to many people. As is often the case with lung cancer, it was a fast deterioration. Within a year and a half John had succumbed to the disease.

I went to John's funeral--it was huge. There were hundreds and hundreds of people there. Many I knew, some because of their high public profile, but more because John had sent in so many people to the clinic in the time period that he was off smoking. Even after the diagnosis he was still sending people in.

One of the men there was from one of the recent clinics and had told me how tragic this was that John had lost his life and how his lost quit was probably the reason. To be realistic I told him that it is possible that if John had quit the first time in the clinic it may not have made a difference. He basically found out he had lung cancer three years after he quit, and that lung cancer could be present for 5 years or even 10 years without presenting symptoms or even showing up on the x-ray. Being that the day I met him was about 6 years before the diagnosis, it was not totally improbable that at that time the cancer had already been initiated and was silently growing.

The man then proceeded to tell me that my clinic was not the first clinic John had tried. That in fact, 10 years before joining that first group with me, he and John had gone to another local clinic together to quit and both in a matter of days wrote it off as a bad time to quit--but knew they would both quit again one day.

Well John was right, he did eventually quit again one day. But it turned out to be over 16 years later. Now the odds were quite different--if he had quit that first time around he probably would never had developed the disease that ultimately cost him his life.

The lesson here needs to be once you have a quit going, do everything in your power to make it last. While you are seeing people come back who just seem to be quitting again, if you relapse you just don't know you will ever get the strength or desire to quit again, and that even if you do, you don't know whether something won't go wrong in the interim period before the next quit.

John is not the only person I know who fits this profile--I know lots of them--people who could have had extra years and extra decades who lost them by minimizing the implications of not quitting or of relapsing. Once you have a quit smoking, understand your very life is contingent on understanding the importance of knowing to never take another puff!

Joel

***Important Clarification***

I originally wrote this article before we had our current relapse policy at Freedom. People cannot relapse and simply join back up at Freedom now. All a relapsed person can do is read what we have to offer. This may not be such a bad thing though--there is a pretty good chance that if the relapsed member had spent his or her time reading the first time around he or she would never have relapsed.

The example in this story is still an important one, hitting home the point the importance of making this quit continue to succeed by simply sticking to the personal commitment you made when you joined up at Freedom to never take another puff.

Joel
Reply

Nico157
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:30

26 Jul 2007, 03:13 #30

Joel,

Thank you for sharing this story. It is one of many that have really touched me and have helped me understand the thruth about (the dangers of) my addiction.

Nicoline
1 month 5 days
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