Past FAILURES

My3Sons (Green)
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:17

22 Jun 2002, 10:50 #11

Thanks for thinking of me Joel but I'm not exactly sure how this one makes me feel. I'm now feeling terrified that I didn't make it in time! I understand what your intent here is but now that I've quit.....

I guess it would have been fine if I hadn't known it was three years (or 5-10 before detection!). I've been to the Dr. and had the x-rays, lung tests, blood tests, etc.. and all is well. I guess one of my strengths in my quit was that I was feeling like "phew...I made it"! "my kids aren't going to watch ME die of Lung Cancer!" "I'm NEVER taking that risk again" I was able to quit for reasons other than just fear this time...fear just makes me panic and we all know what that does, especially when it's a fear over something that I NOW have no control over. I feel almost hopeless now, like I'm doing this for nothing simply because I relapsed while using NRT. I guess I'm trying to say that Fear may have brought me to the quit but it's not what's going to keep me here. Fear leads me to panic and if I have no control over it it leads to hoplessness thus leading do depression so why bother!

If you're amidst a quit now, there HAS to come a point when you stop dwelling and kicking yourself for a lost quit. By relapsing I took a serious risk, can I do anything about it now? No. I have no choice now but to move on and stay positive about THIA quit and remember what I've learned from the previous one. I actually DID learn from the last quit that I can't take another puff, even though I had been told. That IS something people eventually have to learn for themselves, even though it's the hard way. How many times did your kids have to do something before they realized you were right?

Just for curiousity, how many people really do quit the first time they try?

Colleen
One month, two weeks, four days, 21 hours, 49 minutes and 47 seconds. 1497 cigarettes not smoked, saving $224.59. Life saved: 5 days, 4 hours, 45 minutes.
One is too many and a million is not enough!!
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Jun 2002, 06:45 #12

For those fearing success in quitting just know there is something to be more afraid of--the fear of failure at quitting smoking. Failing to quit will cost a person his or her Freedom, his or her health, and over time, his or her life. To keep the fear of failure from becoming a reality always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Lilac (Bronze)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

01 Sep 2002, 22:42 #13

My husband quit smoking 20 years ago. In truth it was after a heart attack and his "quit" was instigated, he says, by my incessant nagging at him to quit which ,he says, was worse than not smoking. Whatever caused him to quit, he never complained , not once, was never grouchy or ,in fact, showed any emotional or physical withdrawal symptoms at all.. He, several times, through the years threatened to start smoking again unless I "cut down". He never asked me to quit altho' he worried about the consequences you have described in this message.. I asked him many times through the years if he ever wanted a cigarette. He always said, "Sure, I could smoke a cigarette anytime and probably enjoy it but I don't want one and so what would be the point?" He has been very supportive of my effort to quit. Only once did he express what I know must be his true feelings. He said, " You 've quit smoking , I don't see what all the fuss is about." He had a 48 year smoking history and quit smoking when he was 60. I hope he has beat the odds.lung wise. It is too late to reverse the heart damage but stopping smoking seems to have given him an extra 20 years plus and he is still going strong.. Lilac
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Oct 2002, 08:15 #14

Image There is only one thing more dangerous now that a past failure and that is a future one. Future ones are totally avoidable now as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Dec 2002, 01:07 #15

One of our newer members, a person who had just about three weeks off smoking just posted that he or she had relapsed and would be back when he or she had achieved 72 hours without smoking. It is apparant that the person did very little reading here at Freedom, for he or she did not even read that the relapse policy had changed. Pretty amazing considering it had changed over a month before the person ever joined Freedom.

Reading here is important to avoid any confusion about our policies. Reading here is even more important though to avoid any confusion about nicotine addiction. What you don't learn about nicotine addiction can kill you. It is pretty obvious that this person has not learned that the only way to keep a quit alive and himself or herself along with it is to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Jan 2003, 23:08 #16

Image I saw where a new member wrote about how she had numerous past quits that were blown between one and six months and was wondering why. There is no mystery here, a person loses a quit between one and six months for the same reason other people lose quits at ten years or at ten minutes after quitting--they take a puff on a cigarette. To stay free is as simple as always knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Apr 2003, 23:48 #17

For anyone thinking about going back to smoking for a short time period.
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MsArmstrongKIS
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

26 Apr 2003, 23:58 #18

Thanks Joel! I have been doing less reading at Freedom than I used to and this morning I knew it was time to go for another dunk in the truth tank and not lose focus on what it really means to go back to smoking. Finals may only last a month but maintaining an active addiction could last for many, many years and eventually cause a premature death while I was still working hard at whatever those finals lead to for a career.

It would be too big a loss and too big a risk to make it worthwhile. Amazing how quickly I can forget. . .I like to think I'm too educated to ever take another puff, but the lessons do lose their edge after time if you don't come in for some reinforcement. And I think my quit is younger than I like to give it credit for.

John's story in this post really hits home. . .

Alex
I have chosen not to smoke for 2 Months 1 Week 5 Days 18 Hours 29 Minutes 26 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 1148. Money saved: $287.08.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Apr 2003, 00:03 #19

I'm glad you read this Alex. I was looking for another post on a similar topic to bring up. Then I saw it had John's story in that post too, titled I know I will quit again. Give it a read anyway.

Joel
Last edited by Joel on 10 Aug 2011, 01:44, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Jul 2003, 20:40 #20

Freedom's Relapse Policy
Freedom's relapse policy is simple. Once we understand the law of addiction it deprives us of any legitimate excuse for relapse. Any member who intentionally relapses shall permanently lose posting privileges.
NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF
Last edited by Joel on 15 Jun 2010, 11:55, edited 1 time in total.
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