Franksmom5
Franksmom5

April 15th, 2005, 11:17 pm #21

I too have just come upon your wonderful post today and as I have told many people and posted on this board, when urged by my doctor to quit, I have always answered, I don't smoke that much -- only ten a day. My doctor who complimented me on my weight control, exercise habits and great blood work results, commented, even if it's one, it's too many and you are negating all the good you are doing. That thought shall always stay with me and now that I am green (yesterday) with a long way to go, and taking it a day at a time, I know my doctor was right. Thanks for an inspiring post. I am passing it along to a friend of mine who is trying (?) desperately to quit. Maybe it will shed some light on her addiction.
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McClain
McClain

April 16th, 2005, 8:33 am #22

Kay,
Thank You, for the great post. I just came across it today. Like you I thought the same I am not that much of a smoker and all sorts of people around me smoke alot more then me, I must be ok, I have control. Until I tried to quit, oh so many times.
Also like Lo, so many people did not know that I smoked and now I tell them, I guess this is because I feel SO good about not smoking now. Now I can say, I am not a smoker.
What a wonderful talent you have for writing.
Keep up the great work and congrats on your progress


Kimberly - 20 days and about 22 hours.
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kattatonic1 gold4
kattatonic1 gold4

April 16th, 2005, 12:23 pm #23

Hello Freedom friends,
Thanks for the nice comments about my old dramatic high horsin' post. The dramatics actually embarass me now but I'll blame it on the phase I was going through being Double Green when I wrote it. (I skipped the anger phase but did other emotional swinging!)
I am very proud of you all(!) and glad that something I wrote could be of some help. I wanted to check in to show you my stats these days.
The most important thing I learned about being Not Much of a Smoker was that I was in almost constant withdrawal for years. I learned that here at Freedom and WhyQuit. I thought I loved every cigarette because each one, after several hours of abstaining, was fulfilling the dependency I had on nicotine.
Law of addiction
Are "aaahh" memories calling your name?
Now I perceive the pursuit of that feeling as an addict searching for a high. We don't usually use the word "high" with nicotine addiction but I know I was looking for that "ahh" feeling all the time, particularly when I was binge smoking. It took me a while to find my "normal" here in Quitsville , but I cannot express to you how glad I am that I did. I don't need that "ahh" feeling any more.
Believe it or not, Ripley, I haven't even wanted that "ahh" feeling for a very, very, very long time. Freedom is fantastic! Keep up the great work, friends. You are worth it!
Kay (Gold)
Celebrating 1 Year, 3 Months, 23 Days, 18 Hours and 49 Minutes of Freedom!
Forsaking 9596 rolls of burning toxic weeds and chemicals
has liberated $3,131.97 and 33 Days and 7 Hours of my life!
Last edited by kattatonic1 gold4 on September 12th, 2009, 11:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

October 27th, 2005, 9:18 pm #24

Well Jamie,
If you liked Kay's Today is Some Day, One Day, Tomorrow and Monday
then I hope you and many others will enjoy another of the 'Kay Classics'.
JoeJ Free on Day 290 and every day I choose to NTAP!
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on September 12th, 2009, 12:03 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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enjoyinglifeJamie
enjoyinglifeJamie

October 27th, 2005, 9:45 pm #25

Wow how many chords does that strike with me? Let me count the ways.
I'm having another one of my "I'm not alone" moments.

I too had responses like "that's all you smoke? why bother then?"
* or *
(from an ex-smoker) "If I only smoked 4 or 5 a day I would have never quit!" - hmmm...who was I lying to then? 4 or 5 a day...puh-lease. Maybe a few times, thinking I was on my way to quitting by gradual withdrawal. Good thing I found Freedom so I could stop torturing myself. How ironic- I thought I was doing a good thing. It made me feel like I "deserved" those that I did smoke that much more.

I remember my father-in-law told me once (he's a recovering alcoholic for almost 30 years)...he told me that he used to smoke, and he had himself down to ONE cigarette a day. That's it, just one. At the end of his day in the evening. But if he didn't have that one, he'd pull his hair out. He was just as addicted to that one smoke, as I was to my "not many smokes." Just as addicted as some are to their 3+ packs a day.

Just when I think my eyes are wide open, I read another eye opener. Thank you so much Kay for writing another tremendous post.
And thank YOU JoeJ for popping it up. It's amazing that was written a mere 2 months into a quit...I have so many emotions regarding my quit but I could hardly dream of putting them down into such eloquent words.

What a great place. Freedom rocks.

jamie - workin on day 192
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

November 24th, 2005, 2:17 pm #26

After a night in a smoky bar celebrating my daughter's 21st - Just had to post to this 'Kay Classic'.
Oh, did I mention that the cousin I refer to in Message 19 above, her name is Kathleen.
Her nickname - Kat.
"Afterward whenever I wanted to quit, I would marvel to my doctor, "How can it be so hard for me to quit? I barely smoke compared to most people I know!" She would say, "Someone who uses 5mg of heroine a day is just as much an addict as someone who uses 200mg a day."

Doesn't matter the degree - an Addict is an Addict is an Addict! If you are not totally clean then your addiction is in control & callling the shots. You are not.

If you are totally clean then you ARE in control & calling your own shots.

Naturally, nicotine free, the way you were meant to be. NTAP!
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on September 12th, 2009, 12:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

January 24th, 2006, 10:54 am #27

For MJ
see also - Quitting by gradual withdrawal

Joel's Audio lessons
Joel's Audio lessons
Quitting by gradual withdrawal 2.35mb 7.54mb 1.03mb 07:13 10/18/06
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on September 12th, 2009, 11:32 am, edited 2 times in total.
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forza d animo
forza d animo

May 2nd, 2006, 10:53 pm #28

Jason's diary entry (381) made me think of this. It is perhaps most disconcerting when we see someone relapse who has been nicotine free for an extended period of time. Denial is an insidious disease of the mind that allows us to justify our self destructive behavior without having to admit to it. "It is only a cigar, it is only once a week and it is not actually smoking because I am not inhaling."

Regardless of your delivery device, it is still nicotine addiction.

I hope he finds his way back.

Joseph
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

August 8th, 2006, 9:59 am #29

Reposting Kay's 'HighHorsin' classic For a recently arrived member who 'only smoked 1 - 3 cigarettes a day' as well as a few other reasons' near and dear to me.



Joe J exercising my Freedom of Choice for 574 Days (I know that for sure cause I looked it up on my Quit Counter) NTAP!
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JewelieLG.ffn
JewelieLG.ffn

November 28th, 2006, 4:13 am #30

I almost could have written this, except my Not Much of a Smoker was in the closet. Brilliantly written! Thank you so much.
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smokefreeJD Gold
smokefreeJD Gold

November 29th, 2006, 1:57 am #31

Ahhh perfect timing. This string definitely needs a reference here!
50 smoking reduction & same death risks
Last edited by smokefreeJD Gold on September 12th, 2009, 11:36 am, edited 1 time in total.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

December 23rd, 2006, 11:26 pm #32

If you like this post of Kay's then you may also want to read Today is Some Day, One Day, Tomorrow and Monday. Both of the essays are 'Kay Classics'.
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on September 12th, 2009, 12:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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come clean
come clean

December 24th, 2006, 1:48 am #33

I just wrote my first post on this site, and then read this which goes with what I was writing. This was great, thank you for re-posting.

Alex
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forza d animo
forza d animo

January 3rd, 2007, 6:21 am #34

Jason's diary entry (381) made me think of this. It is perhaps most disconcerting when we see someone relapse who has been nicotine free for an extended period of time. Denial is an insidious disease of the mind that allows us to justify our self destructive behavior without having to admit to it. "It is only a cigar, it is only once a week and it is not actually smoking because I am not inhaling."
Regardless of your delivery device, it is still nicotine addiction.

Joseph
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Joel
Joel

January 30th, 2007, 3:18 am #35

I see a new member who will relate to this.
Last edited by Joel on September 12th, 2009, 12:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

May 15th, 2007, 7:11 pm #36

"Afterward whenever I wanted to quit, I would marvel to my doctor, "How can it be so hard for me to quit? I barely smoke compared to most people I know!" She would say, "Someone who uses 5mg of heroin a day is just as much an addict as someone who uses 200mg a day."
Doesn't matter the degree - an Addict is an Addict is an Addict!
If you are not totally clean of nicotine then your addiction is in control & callling the shots.
You are not.
If you are totally clean then you ARE in control
& calling your own shots.
Naturally, nicotine free, the way you were meant to be. NTAP!

Joe J Free Gold - 854 days
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GarnetIsMyRealName
GarnetIsMyRealName

October 25th, 2007, 12:56 am #37

Thanks Kay!
This definitely hit me because I didn't smoke a pack a day - maybe half or so? I don't know exactly. I was basically a closet smoker too, so no visible high horse, but I always believed I could just stop if I wanted to. But everytime I tried, it never worked. Until now.
- Garnet (8 days)
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dixieanny
dixieanny

August 11th, 2009, 9:20 am #38

THANK YOU, KAY, FOR THIS INSIGHTFUL POST INTO DRUG ADDICTION.
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prucat
prucat

July 12th, 2011, 1:17 am #39

This post was highlighted on today's reading; it's a great post! Looks like it was written about 8 years ago and I'd be willing to bet the wonderful author of that post is still enjoying life free from the Not Much Of An Addiction. Lots of bells went off; I didn't smoke a lot either, or so I thought till I realized that the 20-pack I'd smoked that day was actually purchased around 10 am so I smoked a half-dozen from the previous pack before the new pack. So it wasn't 20, it was 26. Liar, liar. And then I wasn't a hard core smoker because I exercised every day, though of course, I was exercising a little less intensely because I was a bit off or tired, couldn't have been that the lack of oxygen from smoking 20, no wait, 26 cigaretttes was affecting me. The lies are incredible and one builds upon the other upon the other until finally a smoker has two choices: tear down the wall, or hide behind it for the rest of their life. That's it. The only two choices. If I had accepted the lie that I was Not Much of A Smoker, then I would not have decided to become Not Much of a Quitter. I have 40 days behind me. One day at a time, I hope to have 40 years behind me before my time here ends. Not Much of a Smoker was of Much Help today.  NTAP  -Sylvia the prucat, Proud to be green
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Joined: November 11th, 2008, 7:22 pm

November 27th, 2014, 12:29 pm #40



Smokers smoking fewer cigarettes
harder, deeper and longer

While the below new study found that the average number of cigarettes smoked per day fell from 17.3 between 1998-1994 to 12.3 per day in 2012, it also found that the cotinine per cigarette smoked (a nicotine metabolite and marker) increased by 42 percent. 

Fewer places to smoke, with each cigarette more expensive, it may be decades before we know the long-term health consequences of assaulting lung and body tissues with more intense concentrations of the hundreds of toxins that accompany the nicotine needed to briefly satisfy the addict's wanting and urges for more.

Imagine entire days where you never once think about wanting to smoke, dip, chew or vape nicotine. Once ready to journey home, we invite you to explorewww.WhyQuit.com, as it was built with you in mind. And there was always only one rule, that as REAL drug addicts in every sense (seehttp://whyquit.com/whyquit/LinksAAddiction.html ), when quitting there's no such thing as just one, or just once. As permanent as alcoholism, for us, one puff will always be too many, while thousands never enough!


Study Title: Variation in Nicotine Intake Among U.S. Cigarette Smokers During the Past 25 Years: Evidence From NHANES Surveys.

Journal: Nicotine & Tobacco Research. 2014 Dec; Vol. 16(12), Pages 1620-1628

Authors: Jarvis MJ1, Giovino GA2, O'Connor RJ3, Kozlowski LT2, Bernert JT4.

Abstract [Study Summary]

OBJECTIVE: To estimate changes in nicotine intakes among U.S. cigarette smokers from 1988 to 2012 with the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES).

METHODS: NHANES provides data on nationally representative samples of cigarette smokers from the civilian noninstitutionalized U.S. population. A total of 4,304 smokers aged 20 years and older were studied in NHANES III 1988-1994 and 7,095 were studied in the continuous NHANES 1999-2012. We examined serum cotinine concentrations, daily cigarette consumption, and estimated nicotine intake per cigarette, with adjustment for sex, age, racial/ethnic background, level of education, and body mass index.

RESULTS: There was little overall change in nicotine intake from smoking cigarettes either in the U.S. population as a whole or in major racial/ethnic subgroups during the 25-year period from 1988. Serum cotinine averaged 223.7ng/mL (95% confidence interval [CI] = 216.1-231.3) in 1988-1994, which was not significantly different from the adjusted mean of 219.2ng/mL (95% CI = 214.1-224.4) in 1999-2012. During the same period, average daily cigarette consumption declined substantially, from 17.3 (95% CI = 16.5-18.0) in 1988-1994 to 12.3 (95% CI = 11.0-13.6) by 2012. Cotinine per cigarette smoked increased by some 42% between 1988-1994 and 2011-2012, from a geometric mean of 12.4 (95% CI = 11.7-13.1) to 17.6 (95% CI = 16.1-19.2).

CONCLUSIONS: Reductions in cigarette smoking prevalence since the late 1980s, changes in cigarette product design, and the widespread introduction of smoke-free policies have not had a significant impact on nicotine intakes among U.S. smokers. Reductions in cigarette consumption have been offset by increased nicotine intake per cigarette smoked. 

PubMed Abstract Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25063772
Last edited by JohnPolito on November 27th, 2014, 12:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: November 13th, 2008, 2:04 pm

November 27th, 2014, 2:35 pm #41

Related videos:
Amount smoked
Quitting by gradual withdrawal
"How can I be addicted, I can go hours without smoking."
Are there social smokers?
"I don't need to smoke"


My 1990 article A safer way to smoke ties into John's post above. In order to increase profits, the tobacco industry used to find ways to get smokers to buy more and more of their products, but as more smoking restrictions came into play, they have had to adjust their strategies. Since smokers are finding themselves in greater time periods of not being able to smoke, the industry had to come up with ways to make life more tolerable for smokers facing such restrictions, otherwise their day to day suffering may inspire many smokers to just quit. So in a way they had to reverse their production and promotion techniques to come up with ways to minimize the day to day suffering of chronic withdrawal. Unfortunately, this is likely to allow many smokers to maintain their addiction and eventually much more serious suffering down the line from the host of smoking caused conditions that are likely to develop over the smokers life. 


Videos related to the issue of long-term suffering are:


For people who think quitting smoking is the hardest thing they have ever done.
Quitting smoking: A fate worse than death
Last edited by Joel Spitzer on November 27th, 2014, 2:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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RobG
RobG

August 20th, 2015, 7:28 pm #42

What a wonderful post. Really sums up my feelings today. This stood out for me:

"Someone who uses 5mg of heroine a day is just as much an addict as someone who uses 200mg a day."

Thanks for helping me get through this last hour. :)
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