Normal depressive reaction or a real organic depressive episode

The emotions that flow from nicotine cessation
Skylark0
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

30 Aug 2006, 02:56 #31

Please could any oldbies who have experienced depression as a symptom of their quit give me some help? This is a new emotion to me. Fortunately, I have never suffered from depression before in my life (I am 44). I am 7 weeks into my quit and everything has gone well so far in that I have dealt with all the difficulties experienced and felt confident.

However, since yesterday I have felt extremely low. I feel tearful, have had thoughts that life is not enjoyable and just felt very very low. I don't know how else to describe it. It is not a junkie-mind thing where I a voice in my head is telling me that smoking will make me feel better. I still don't want to smoke and am not tempted to do so at all. It is just a pit of the stomach, very low feeling and it is horrible.

Like other symptoms will this go when comfort arrives? How do I know if it's quit related or if it's something more sinister? Did anyone else not have this symptom at first but get it further down the line as I have? It is scaring me because it has crept up on me and of all the symptoms I expected to have to deal with, this wasn't one of them. And also because I don't seem to be able to logically argue or read myself out of it. Does anyone know what I mean?

Amanda x
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

30 Aug 2006, 03:13 #32

For people who are off for weeks, months, years or decades and who are cranky, nervous, depressed, angry, have sore throats, heart burn, ear aches, backaches, headaches, eye strains, poor vision, hearing problems, broken bones, have stubbed their toes, have financial concerns, job stresses, or any other extraordinary issues going on in their lives at the moment. Don't blame every feeling, bad or good in your life on the fact that you happened to have quit smoking. Life goes on without smoking and as the closing paragraph in this article states:

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

30 Aug 2006, 03:14 #33

Every now and then a person will experience a specific symptom and put up a post asking whether or not the symptom is one that is normally experienced by people who have quit smoking and if others here had experienced the same symptom when they had quit. As far as if a specific symptom is one that "can" occur after cessation, we have put together a pretty inclusive string titled Possible Withdrawal Symptoms.

As far as whether or not another member or numerous members experienced the same symptom, it does not really make a difference if they had or had not. It is like someone writing and saying that he or she is having a tingling sensation in his or her arm and wondering if anyone else experienced the same symptom when they quit. Then a person who had slept on his or her arm one night when quitting smoking and woke up with that particular arm tingling writes back and says that sure enough, he or she had a tingling arm the week he or she had quit. Now the recent quitter feels a sense of relief because he or she has seen that one other person had the same symptom. So the person does nothing.

The problem was that the person who wrote the question was not having tingling from having slept on his or her arm, but rather, was experiencing a symptom of a heart attack that he was now ignoring. This action could result in a fatal mistake of not seeking what was immediately needed medical attention.

Read the posts Giving and getting medical advice online., Possible Withdrawal Symptoms, and Life goes on without smoking. If you have a concern of a symptom that you are experiencing consult your personal doctor. We say it often here, that the only medical advice that we can give is that to reduce your risk of a host of illnesses and conditions is to stick to your commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Feb 2007, 21:17 #34

Nobody should get the impression that the majority of people become clinically depressed or need medications to deal with the normal depression phase that accompanies initial smoking cessation. The fact is that only a small percentage of people will have a full-blown organic depression occurring just after quitting smoking.

But that fact is not important if you are one of these individuals. What is important is that if you believe you are organically depressed get checked out by your doctor.

Especially if you are a person with a past history of treatment for depression or if your depressive episode is lasting more than a week and is causing a real disruption in your life, get checked out. You may indeed benefit from treatment or maybe your physician will just give you the reassurance that you are really okay. Either way it doesn't hurt to get the situation professionally assessed.

Joel

I added the following comments into the string "Is anyone else experiencing the symptom of...?" I feel that the concept ties into this string also:
There are times where people have emotional issues stemming from family problems, work problems, actual organically based mental illnesses, etc, who will write on the board that they are having overwhelming emotional feelings. Then other people will weigh in saying that they had problems at one time or another when quitting but it got better. While it may be true that the person offering the advice was just having a reaction to smoking cessation, it may not be true for the person writing now as to his or her mental anguish. Giving the person the idea that it is automatically going to get better when the problem may not be simply from not smoking may be doing the person a real disservice. It may prevent the individual from seeking the real professional help he or she may in fact need for problems that were not in fact quit related.

As it says in the string How do I deal with....

A quit smoking site is not the place to solve major life traumas. A quit smoking site may be the best site to deal with smoking, depending on the site, and there may be some other specialized sites that are helpful in dealing with other traumas too, but often people on an Internet sites may not have the best training or understanding or be the best prepared for dealing with the specific problem at hand. You may find people who really want to help but who may not in fact be the best people to deal with the problem you are facing.

If a member encounters real life tragedies they should seek help from professionals. Who would you call if your car breaks down? Would you call a friend who has no particular knowledge of car repairs and whose own car is currently broken down too. This person cannot help you fix your car and cannot even at this point in time offer you a ride. If your car breaks down you call a mechanic. If your computer suddenly dies you don't call a friend whose computer also died and has not been able to get it going again. If your home plumbing explodes you don't get right on the Internet and waste time chatting on a bulletin board about how bad everything smells without first calling a plumber to actually fix the problem. If your house all of sudden starts on fire you don't go to the Internet and compare notes with others who may have lived through a fire experience--you call the fire department. If someone breaks into your home while you are still there you don't go to the Internet to talk out your fears. You either call the police or try to escape from your home. If you are experiencing sudden chest pains or maybe all of a sudden lose vision in one eye you shouldn't spend time looking up symptoms on the Internet or chatting with others who may have had a similar experience at one time, you call for paramedics.

If something emotionally big is happening in your life and you find yourself spinning out or control you need to seek professional help too. It may mean calling your doctor, a professionally sanctioned crisis hotline in your town who can offer real live support, going to a local emergency room, calling 911 or what ever emergency number is set up in your area by local authorities, depending on the severity of the problem and how fast you can get action.

This list could have gone on but hopefully everyone gets the point here. If you ever find yourself in a medical or psychological crisis seek professional assistance, meaning, seek a professional in the arena of the specific problem you are encountering.

Again, depending on the problem you are facing there are professionals who can help. There are professional mechanics, plumbers, firemen, police, paramedics, crisis counselors, psychologists and physicians. Deal with emergencies head on when they occur. At the same time stay focused on the fact that whatever the problem, taking a cigarette will not help it.

Once you have dealt with the crisis, and your full attention is not needed to get out of the immediate danger, then is the time to come to a quit smoking site and reinforce your resolve to stay smoke free, either by reading or maybe even posting. Hopefully if you come back in to post, the essence of the post will be saying how you have proved to yourself once again that even under the most extreme of circumstances that you are able to stay smoke free by just sticking to your commitment that no matter what else is going on around you that you still know to never take another puff!

Joel
Last edited by Joel on 19 Apr 2009, 04:27, edited 3 times in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Apr 2008, 03:28 #35

There are times where people have emotional issues stemming from family problems, work problems, actual organically based mental illnesses, etc, who will write on the board that they are having overwhelming emotional feelings. Then other people will weigh in saying that they had problems at one time or another when quitting but it got better.

While it may be true that the person offering the advice was just having a reaction to smoking cessation, it may not be true for the person writing now as to his or her mental anguish. Giving the person the idea that it is automatically going to get better when the problem may not be simply from not smoking may be doing the person a real disservice. It may prevent the individual from seeking the real professional help he or she may in fact need for problems that were not in fact quit related.

As it says in our Medical Disclaimer:

This site is not meant to replace the advice of any physician. Do not rely upon any information that you read here at Freedom (or that you obtain through posts, email or links) to replace consultations or advice received by qualified health professionals regarding your own specific situation. The information provided here at Freedom is intended as smoking cessation educational materials only and it should NEVER be construed as medical advice.

If you have any question in your mind regarding any lingering health concern, including depression or mental health, IMMEDIATELY seek medical assistance. If you are not satisfied with the advice being rendered by a physician, you always have the right to obtain another medical opinion. We are not physicians or doctors here at Freedom. We are students and teachers of smoking cessation.

It is also important for you to understand that as a smoking cessation forum Freedom is staffed entirely by cessation educators who are not physicians, pharmacists or dietitians. Further, Freedom's Rules prohibit any member from rendering any medical advice to other members, from giving medication or herbal advice or recommendations, or from giving dieting or exercise advice or recommendations, other than the advice to seek the assistance of trained and qualified health care professionals.

There are organizations and individuals whose sites have disclaimers such as this to simply protect themselves legally. We have this policy because we believe it's right for every individual reading here. We do all we can to make sure that any information or concepts acquired here do not pose medical risks to readers.

When it comes to the treatment or management of any medical condition we sincerely believe that it is best for every person to deal with a qualified medical professional in their real world. The materials, concepts and information shared here allow readers to improve their health, and likely extend the productive years of their lives, by simply making and sticking to a personal commitment to Never Take Another Puff, Dip, or Chew.

Also from above:

Nobody should get the impression that the majority of people become clinically depressed or need medications to deal with the normal depression phase that accompanies initial smoking cessation. The fact is that only a small percentage of people will have a full-blown organic depression occurring just after quitting smoking.

But that fact is not important if you are one of these individuals. What is important is that if you believe you are organically depressed get checked out by your doctor.

Especially if you are a person with a past history of treatment for depression or if your depressive episode is lasting more than a week and is causing a real disruption in your life, get checked out. You may indeed benefit from treatment or maybe your physician will just give you the reassurance that you are really okay. Either way it doesn't hurt to get the situation professionally assessed.

Joel
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Nov 2008, 21:09 #36

This site is not meant to replace the advice of any physician. Do not rely upon any information that you read here at Freedom (or that you obtain through posts, email or links) to replace consultations or advice received by qualified health professionals regarding your own specific situation. The information provided here at Freedom is intended as smoking cessation educational materials only and it should NEVER be construed as medical advice.
If you have any question in your mind regarding any lingering health concern, including depression or mental health, IMMEDIATELY seek medical assistance. If you are not satisfied with the advice being rendered by a physician, you always have the right to obtain another medical opinion. We are not physicians or doctors here at Freedom. We are students and teachers of smoking cessation.
It is also important for you to understand that as a smoking cessation forum Freedom is staffed entirely by cessation educators who are not physicians, pharmacists or dietitians. Further, Freedom's Rules prohibit any member from rendering any medical advice to other members, from giving medication or herbal advice or recommendations, or from giving dieting or exercise advice or recommendations, other than the advice to seek the assistance of trained and qualified health care professionals.

There are organizations and individuals whose sites have disclaimers such as this to simply protect themselves legally. We have this policy because we believe it's right for every individual reading here. We do all we can to make sure that any information or concepts acquired here do not pose medical risks to readers.

When it comes to the treatment or management of any medical condition we sincerely believe that it is best for every person to deal with a qualified medical professional in their real world. The materials, concepts and information shared here allow readers to improve their health, and likely extend the productive years of their lives, by simply making and sticking to a personal commitment to Never Take Another Puff, Dip, or Chew.
Reply

JohnPolito
Joined: 11 Nov 2008, 19:22

03 Jun 2010, 12:22 #37

 
 
Cigarette smoking and depression:
tests of causal linkages using
a longitudinal birth cohort

 
The British Journal of Psychiatry (2010) 196: 440-446.

 
Joseph M. Boden, PhD, David M. Fergusson, PhD and L. John Horwood, MSc 
Abstract

Background

Research on the comorbidity between cigarette smoking and major depression has not elucidated the pathways by which smoking is associated with depression.

Aims

To examine the causal relationships between smoking and depression via fixed-effects regression and structural equation modelling.

Method

Data were gathered on nicotine-dependence symptoms and depressive symptoms in early adulthood using a birth cohort of over 1000 individuals.

Results

Adjustment for confounding factors revealed persistent significant associations between nicotine-dependence symptoms and depressive symptoms. Structural equation modelling suggested that the best-fitting causal model was one in which nicotine dependence led to increased risk of depression. The findings suggest that the comorbidity between smoking and depression arises from two routes; the first involving common or correlated risk factors and the second a direct path in which smoking increases the risk of depression.

Conclusions

This evidence is consistent with the conclusion that there is a cause and effect relationship between smoking and depression in which cigarette smoking increases the risk of symptoms of depression.
 
http://bjp.rcpsych.org/cg...ntent/abstract/196/6/440









Smoking link to depression By Martin Johnston
4:00 AM Wednesday Jun 2, 2010

Smoking may cause an increased risk of depression, according to a New Zealand study which has followed 1200 people since they were born in 1977.

Smoking and major depression have long been known to be linked.

But which is the primary cause has been unclear, and it is possible that they reinforce each other.

Studies have suggested that some people who have depression smoke as a form of self-medication.

Researchers from Otago University at Christchurch, led by Professor David Ferguson, analysed data collected when participants in their study were in the late teens to mid-20s.

They concluded it is probably smoking that increases the risk of suffering symptoms of major depression, rather than the reverse.

They found that at the age of:

* 18 years - 14 per cent of the study participants were addicted to nicotine and 18 per cent had serious depression.

* 21 years - 25 per cent were addicted and 18 per cent had depression.

* 25 years - 23 per cent were addicted and 14 per cent had depression.

"Overall, those reporting at least five symptoms of nicotine dependence had rates of depressive symptoms that were 2.13 times those of individuals who reported no symptoms of nicotine dependence," says the researchers' paper.

The findings were published yesterday in the British Journal of Psychiatry.

The paper says statistical calculations suggested the cause-and-effect link was one-way, from nicotine addiction to depression.

They found no evidence of a link in the reverse direction, from depression to smoking.

"The reasons for this relationship are not clear," said Professor Ferguson. "However, it's possible that nicotine causes changes to neurotransmitter activity in the brain, leading to an increased risk of depression."

SMOKING RISKS

Smoking is linked to an increased risk of: * Cancer * Heart disease * Stroke * Impotence * Probably severe depression
Story Source Link 

Copyright 2010, APN Holdings NZ Limited
 
Last edited by JohnPolito on 03 Jun 2010, 12:28, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel Spitzer
Joined: 13 Nov 2008, 14:04

24 Apr 2013, 12:39 #38

Re: New Study: Smoking & Depression
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Research shows quitting smoking often helps depressionApril 2013  - by BeyondBlue.org

Quitting smoking can significantly improve people’s mental health, according to research, which has uncovered a series of important findings.

The beyondblue-funded research underpins a new booklet, Depression and quitting smoking, which addresses the unique challenges that people with depression face when trying to give up.Quit Victoria Executive Director Fiona Sharkie said the perception that people with depression can’t or don’t want to quit is wrong.

“With the right support, not only can people with depression quit, but their depression often improves,” she said. “We know that people often smoke to ease stress or boost their mood, but the opposite is actually true. Research has shown quitting smoking eases depressive symptoms and those effects can last for as long as the smoker stays off the cigarettes.”

The research findings include:

- Smokers are more than twice as likely to report that they regularly feel depressed when compared to ex-smokers who gave up six months earlier.

- Many people with depression quit successfully, but overall are a third less likely to do so than people who aren’t depressed.

beyondblue CEO Kate Carnell said the research has been used to create the free booklet that is aimed at people with depression who want to quit. Ms Carnell said that, despite seeming hard, quitting is the best thing smokers can do for their health.

“We’ve always known the physical benefits of giving up, but this study shows the impact that quitting smoking can also have on people’s moods,” she said. “This study shows that while 37% of smokers say they recently had a prolonged period of feeling down, this number is more than halved to 16% among those who quit six months ago. The figure is 34% for those who try to quit but fail within the first six months, suggesting that even quitting temporarily has some mental health benefits.

“This book advises people with depression that they are capable of giving up cigarettes – just like people who aren’t depressed. It gives information about why they smoke, how to make a plan to quit and strategies they can use to quit once and for all. I urge anyone with depression who smokes to order a copy of the booklet and read it.”

The research was conducted by Dr Catherine Segan from The University of Melbourne’s School of Population and Global Health. For a six-month period, it tracked more than 800 people who contacted Quitline for advice on how to quit, including a quarter with depression.

The research found while people with depression found it more challenging to quit than other people, many were still successful, with one-third having quit successfully six months after first contacting Quitline. This compared with about half of other participants in the research who weren’t depressed.

On the down side, the research also found that 18% of participants with depression reported a significant increase in depression symptoms within two months of quitting compared with 5% of people who had never been depressed. However half of those who had an increase in depression symptoms said they believed it was unrelated to the quit attempt. The research was also unable to draw a direct link between any increase in depressive symptoms and quitting.

Ms Carnell said the findings are a reminder that people with depression who try to quit should do so in consultation with their doctor.

“We know from the research that a third of people with depression have quit successfully six months after first contacting Quitline,” she said. “Quitting can be a challenge for someone with depression, but as this research shows, it can be done.”

Source link: http://www.beyondblue.org.au/media/medi ... depression

Copyright 2013 BeyondBlue



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Joel Spitzer
Joined: 13 Nov 2008, 14:04

13 Jun 2013, 23:49 #39

Last edited by Joel Spitzer on 14 Jun 2013, 00:01, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel Spitzer
Joined: 13 Nov 2008, 14:04

28 Feb 2014, 16:13 #40

Last edited by Joel Spitzer on 01 Mar 2014, 14:52, edited 1 time in total.
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