Normal depressive reaction or a real organic depressive episode

The emotions that flow from nicotine cessation
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:25

19 Jun 2002, 15:53 #21

As so often happens, after you really crystallize and articulate something that's been bugging you, this whole thing is bothering me less now. I think Melissa (Toast) hit upon it in saying I'm "relearning how to live w/o cigarettes." I've been consciously working on sitting with uncomfortable feelings as they arise instead of thinking I have to make them go away immediately (which I used to do by ... smoking, of course ). Thanks also to Richard and Colleen for the kind words and to Joel and John for the useful information. And blondie (Ruth) and Misha, it's good to have company on this journey. I guess, we will be through with this weird sensation (at least for a while), if we follow Colleen's example. I've been reflecting that I used sickerettes to make all of my uncomfortable feelings and empty moments go away (or at least distract me from them). Now I am experimenting with what to do at those times, how to actually live without escaping like the junkie I was. Some former smokers say they grew and changed through quitting -- this must be part of that growth.

Sophy, 1 month, 1week, 23 hours
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

01 Apr 2003, 01:00 #22

This morning I was pondering the question: "Which came first, the addiction or the depression?". I knew I had read something about that here at Freedom, and sure enough, here it is...offered as advice for another depressed Freedomite.

Since I am now able to step from behind the "smoke screen" and look a bit more logically at my addictions and the cause/effect way in which they intermingle with my personal happiness, such questions come to mind often. For those of you concerned, I have already contacted my physician, and as it turns out, I DO seem to be having some anxiety attacks and depressive episodes as related to an organic psychological disorder. A recent outbreak of anxiety related hives, has given me a physical manifestation of my condition as well as proof that I am not "crazy" (well, you get the point). I am actually looking forward to "medicating myself" in a more constructive way in the future, although I am getting a bit more anxious about releasing my other, non-healthy coping mechanisms. I am hoping that alcohol and other mood altering "self-medications" will be effectively replaced with clinically prescribed counter-parts, but I will be certain to check in here if I need any help facing these other addictions. I may not be around very often as I head on this journey, but I will be sure to check in if I ever feel my quit is in jeopardy, as well as keep on reading to reinforce my motivation to remain quit. Thank for all of this great information....

YQS-
Lotus
6 Months, 1 Week
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

01 Apr 2003, 04:42 #23

Slowly but surely it's starting to dawn on me. . .

All of this sadness can't be just from quitting smoking, BUT it is not a sufficient excuse to go back to smoking. I was diagnosed with clinical depression six years ago, before I was a smoker, but I hated the medication I was given and soon found cigarettes an excellent substitute in many unfortunate ways. I have never really made the connection between the events until now, but I did start smoking at almost the exact same time that I quit taking my medication.

Smoking used to help with my depression a lot. It took me out of stressful situations for fifteen minutes, calmed me down, and made me feel like the problem had gone away. What a great little tool. Facing the actual problems is so much more difficult, and for the last few weeks I have been blaming all of my unhappiness on quitting as a way to try to continue using cigarettes to avoid this problem.

Lotus, I really hear you and applaud your courage. Cigarettes were the easy way out and quitting has been rather desperate for me because going to a doctor, getting diagnosed, and having to DEAL is just obnoxious as **** compared to buying a pack every day or so and ignoring this problem. The hard thing to do is often the right thing to do, though. It certainly is in this case.

I've made an appointment, loathe as I was to do it. I hope I'll be able to be more positive on the board (as in life) in the future. I can definitely say that although quitting has been extremely difficult for me, the act of quitting has been a lifeline for me during the last month's reacquaintance with organic depression. In some cases it has really been the only thing I have to grasp at for hope, and I have guarded it pretty jealously because of that. I truly hope and believe I will never take another puff.

YQS
Alex
I have chosen not to smoke for 1 Month 2 Weeks 3 Days 22 Hours 12 Minutes 55 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 734. Money saved: $183.70.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 Apr 2003, 05:24 #24

There are some people who are depressed from an organic basis and medications may be indicated and beneficial for them. What is the difference between taking a prescribed medication to treat depression as opposed to using cigarettes to treat it? First, a prescribed medication must be approved by the FDA and must show some record of being SAFE and EFFECTIVE for treating a specific ailment. Being effective means that it has been shown to clinically help people who have depression-being safe means that there are generally low risk of dangerous side effects and that it is generally not a life threatening treatment. Using cigarettes to treat depression is not likely to be as effective as a prescribed medication and more importantly, carries a mortality rate of 1 in 2. No drug for any purpose would be prescribed that killed one in two people who use it, or even one in one hundred or a thousand if it were not being used to treat a life threatening illness treatable by other less dangerous means. Depression can be a chemical imbalance in some people, just as some other mental illness like schizophrenia or bipolar diseases can be caused from improper balances of certain substances normally present in people who don't have such illnesses. Using medication for these people may be as necessary as a diabetic needing insulin to treat what is basically a chemical imbalance causing a medical condition as opposed to mental illness.

It cannot be determined online by anyone whether an individual is in fact experiencing a normal adjustment period or an organic based depression and so it is imperative that if the question is raised by an individual that he or she may be depressed that he or she gets attention from a person in the real world who has more to go on that words written on a bulletin board. Nobody is qualified to make a definitive diagnosis of mental illness or any diseases without getting more information both history wise and possibly physical measures only available by a physician who actually can test the patient.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 Apr 2003, 05:54 #25


There was a new depression/cessation study just released and this seems like a perfect opportunity to share the results. Having a bit of perspective on how rare or common a condition actually is can sometimes in and of itself be reassuring. Although just 4% of participants in the below study experienced the onset of major depression we each need to be alert to the possibility that 4% of our members may need medical help. It's not a large percentage but a very real percentage for which treatment - not nicotine - is warranted!



Addictive Behaviors 2003 May-Jun;28(3):461-70

Onset of major depression during treatment for nicotine dependence.

Killen JD, Fortmann SP, Schatzberg A, Hayward C, Varady A.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, 1000 Welch Road, 94304, Palo Alto, CA, USA

We monitored the emergence of major depression (MDD) during treatment for nicotine dependence among 224 smokers.
MDD was assessed on three occasions during the course of treatment with the mood disorders portion of the Structured Clinical Interview for the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (SCID), fourth edition (DSM-IV).
Out of 224 participants, 20% had suffered a past episode of MDD, 18% of males and 22% of females. Four percent (n=10) experienced onset of MDD during the course of the study, four males and six females. Only 2 of the 10 cases managed to achieve abstinence at end of treatment. Those who reported large increases in depression symptoms between baseline and end of treatment (Week 10) were less likely to be abstinent at 26-week follow-up.
The evidence indicates that those who treat nicotine dependence must be prepared to monitor and respond to the emergence of depression associated with treatment.

PMID: 12628619 [PubMed - in process]
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 20:35

01 Apr 2003, 07:24 #26

I thought it was time to add in my expereince here. I have been diagnosed as having major depressive illness for a several years now. I had stopped all medications about two years ago. In early February, I realized my depression was returning, so I scheduled an appointment with the psyc. doc. At that time, he noted that ever since I had been seeing him, I had talked about wanting to quit smoking. unpon reflection, I had started smoking at the time of my first serious depression, about 23 years ago. So I started with Welbutrin as an antidepressant, and two weeks later i found Freedom, and quit smoking as well. I really believe that smoking all these years was an attempt to self medicate my depression, and after reviewing a lot of the materials I have found, I also thik that nictine adds to and increases depression. Like so many other of nicotine's effects it has one short erm effect, and quite the oposite long term effects.

I love being nictine free, and at 6 weeks can say that the occasional urge is far outweighed by the good and healthy feelings I am experiencing.

Terry
Terry has not used any nicotine containing product for:
One month, two weeks, two days, 23 hours, and 23 minutes.
2023 cigarettes not smoked, saving $455.36.
Life saved: 1 week, 35 minutes.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

22 Dec 2003, 04:38 #27

Joanne,
I am not sure why or how, but somehow you brought this thread up to the front today. For me and my husband it was in the nick of time and a true blessing.

We both quit Sept. 28, 2003, one week shy of 3 months into our quit. We have been having problems lately and couldn't put a label on them. First we thought stress at work, then stress with caring for his mother, problem still keeps occurring. Today we were going at it again and I wanted to smoke sooo bad. I don't remember having these problems when we smoked, and I thought that our relationship is not worth it. In other words, I would rather smoke than have not smoking ruin my marriage.

So I went to the Freedom site hoping for some help and there was the string to this thread. I had my husband read it and he said it really summed up what he was feeling. We have decided to hold on to our quit and to each other. Now that the problem has a face and a name (so to speak), or that we have some insight into what is happening to us we can work through it together and like I said earlier, hold onto our quit as well as each other.

You see we have been married 25 years and have only known each other as smokers. As with any other couple there are things about each other that bothers us. Nothing big but it adds up over the years. We have tons of unresolved problems due to the irritation, smoke, let it go, issue addressed in this thread. The good news is that none of the issues are really huge, (definately not huge enough to let go of our quit ot our marriage, both are too important.) just big enough that we have to talk, listen and work through them with caring and compromise. Essentially what we have to do is step back a little and get to now each other as non-smokers.

We will continue to make the decision not to smoke one minute, hour, day at a time with the ulimate goal of NTAP. Lynn
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 Dec 2003, 08:17 #28


Janet, only you know whether your holiday blues are historically seasonal or something more in need of treatment. If you see no joy in your day at 60 days please get seen. Medicating depression with the world's most addictive insecticide is self-destructive in itself. If needed, there are scores of non-addictive serotonin and dopamine manipulating medicines. With you in spirit. John
Last edited by John (Gold) on 17 Mar 2009, 02:15, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

29 Sep 2004, 05:31 #29

I was glad to see this thread. My issue is related but not exactly covered here. I've been unable to locate other appropriate reading materials but I'm sure other members in the long term smoker category can direct me.

Quitting was TOO EASY. So why didn't I do it before? Why didn't I have to SUFFER MORE after 39 years of putting my family through ****. I am overwhelmed by GUILT. I know that Linda, Steve, Dina and others may have insights on how to cope with this. They've been there too. So, the question is...Do you just send me off to the SHRINK or is there something I can read first? Karen

14 DAYS

(my computer is old and crummy and this is the best I can do)
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

29 Sep 2004, 06:36 #30

Strings that cover the issue of quitting being too easy:
"Was I addicted?"
Every quit is different
I've encountered plenty of people who quit at one time, had a relatively easy time at it and either figured they were not addicted or that if they were to relapse they would simply just easily quit again. Most of these people are in for a real shock for it they did relapse they found the latter quits much more difficult and in some cases, they lost their lives before getting the chance for their next easy quit. If you think quitting is easy you should see how much easier relapsing can be. Of course, there is one simple way to make sure that you never have to deal with an easy or a hard quit, which is simply to keep this quit going by staying committed to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on 16 Apr 2009, 09:44, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

30 Aug 2006, 02:56 #31

Please could any oldbies who have experienced depression as a symptom of their quit give me some help? This is a new emotion to me. Fortunately, I have never suffered from depression before in my life (I am 44). I am 7 weeks into my quit and everything has gone well so far in that I have dealt with all the difficulties experienced and felt confident.

However, since yesterday I have felt extremely low. I feel tearful, have had thoughts that life is not enjoyable and just felt very very low. I don't know how else to describe it. It is not a junkie-mind thing where I a voice in my head is telling me that smoking will make me feel better. I still don't want to smoke and am not tempted to do so at all. It is just a pit of the stomach, very low feeling and it is horrible.

Like other symptoms will this go when comfort arrives? How do I know if it's quit related or if it's something more sinister? Did anyone else not have this symptom at first but get it further down the line as I have? It is scaring me because it has crept up on me and of all the symptoms I expected to have to deal with, this wasn't one of them. And also because I don't seem to be able to logically argue or read myself out of it. Does anyone know what I mean?

Amanda x
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

30 Aug 2006, 03:13 #32

For people who are off for weeks, months, years or decades and who are cranky, nervous, depressed, angry, have sore throats, heart burn, ear aches, backaches, headaches, eye strains, poor vision, hearing problems, broken bones, have stubbed their toes, have financial concerns, job stresses, or any other extraordinary issues going on in their lives at the moment. Don't blame every feeling, bad or good in your life on the fact that you happened to have quit smoking. Life goes on without smoking and as the closing paragraph in this article states:

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

30 Aug 2006, 03:14 #33

Every now and then a person will experience a specific symptom and put up a post asking whether or not the symptom is one that is normally experienced by people who have quit smoking and if others here had experienced the same symptom when they had quit. As far as if a specific symptom is one that "can" occur after cessation, we have put together a pretty inclusive string titled Possible Withdrawal Symptoms.

As far as whether or not another member or numerous members experienced the same symptom, it does not really make a difference if they had or had not. It is like someone writing and saying that he or she is having a tingling sensation in his or her arm and wondering if anyone else experienced the same symptom when they quit. Then a person who had slept on his or her arm one night when quitting smoking and woke up with that particular arm tingling writes back and says that sure enough, he or she had a tingling arm the week he or she had quit. Now the recent quitter feels a sense of relief because he or she has seen that one other person had the same symptom. So the person does nothing.

The problem was that the person who wrote the question was not having tingling from having slept on his or her arm, but rather, was experiencing a symptom of a heart attack that he was now ignoring. This action could result in a fatal mistake of not seeking what was immediately needed medical attention.

Read the posts Giving and getting medical advice online., Possible Withdrawal Symptoms, and Life goes on without smoking. If you have a concern of a symptom that you are experiencing consult your personal doctor. We say it often here, that the only medical advice that we can give is that to reduce your risk of a host of illnesses and conditions is to stick to your commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Feb 2007, 21:17 #34

Nobody should get the impression that the majority of people become clinically depressed or need medications to deal with the normal depression phase that accompanies initial smoking cessation. The fact is that only a small percentage of people will have a full-blown organic depression occurring just after quitting smoking.

But that fact is not important if you are one of these individuals. What is important is that if you believe you are organically depressed get checked out by your doctor.

Especially if you are a person with a past history of treatment for depression or if your depressive episode is lasting more than a week and is causing a real disruption in your life, get checked out. You may indeed benefit from treatment or maybe your physician will just give you the reassurance that you are really okay. Either way it doesn't hurt to get the situation professionally assessed.

Joel

I added the following comments into the string "Is anyone else experiencing the symptom of...?" I feel that the concept ties into this string also:
There are times where people have emotional issues stemming from family problems, work problems, actual organically based mental illnesses, etc, who will write on the board that they are having overwhelming emotional feelings. Then other people will weigh in saying that they had problems at one time or another when quitting but it got better. While it may be true that the person offering the advice was just having a reaction to smoking cessation, it may not be true for the person writing now as to his or her mental anguish. Giving the person the idea that it is automatically going to get better when the problem may not be simply from not smoking may be doing the person a real disservice. It may prevent the individual from seeking the real professional help he or she may in fact need for problems that were not in fact quit related.

As it says in the string How do I deal with....

A quit smoking site is not the place to solve major life traumas. A quit smoking site may be the best site to deal with smoking, depending on the site, and there may be some other specialized sites that are helpful in dealing with other traumas too, but often people on an Internet sites may not have the best training or understanding or be the best prepared for dealing with the specific problem at hand. You may find people who really want to help but who may not in fact be the best people to deal with the problem you are facing.

If a member encounters real life tragedies they should seek help from professionals. Who would you call if your car breaks down? Would you call a friend who has no particular knowledge of car repairs and whose own car is currently broken down too. This person cannot help you fix your car and cannot even at this point in time offer you a ride. If your car breaks down you call a mechanic. If your computer suddenly dies you don't call a friend whose computer also died and has not been able to get it going again. If your home plumbing explodes you don't get right on the Internet and waste time chatting on a bulletin board about how bad everything smells without first calling a plumber to actually fix the problem. If your house all of sudden starts on fire you don't go to the Internet and compare notes with others who may have lived through a fire experience--you call the fire department. If someone breaks into your home while you are still there you don't go to the Internet to talk out your fears. You either call the police or try to escape from your home. If you are experiencing sudden chest pains or maybe all of a sudden lose vision in one eye you shouldn't spend time looking up symptoms on the Internet or chatting with others who may have had a similar experience at one time, you call for paramedics.

If something emotionally big is happening in your life and you find yourself spinning out or control you need to seek professional help too. It may mean calling your doctor, a professionally sanctioned crisis hotline in your town who can offer real live support, going to a local emergency room, calling 911 or what ever emergency number is set up in your area by local authorities, depending on the severity of the problem and how fast you can get action.

This list could have gone on but hopefully everyone gets the point here. If you ever find yourself in a medical or psychological crisis seek professional assistance, meaning, seek a professional in the arena of the specific problem you are encountering.

Again, depending on the problem you are facing there are professionals who can help. There are professional mechanics, plumbers, firemen, police, paramedics, crisis counselors, psychologists and physicians. Deal with emergencies head on when they occur. At the same time stay focused on the fact that whatever the problem, taking a cigarette will not help it.

Once you have dealt with the crisis, and your full attention is not needed to get out of the immediate danger, then is the time to come to a quit smoking site and reinforce your resolve to stay smoke free, either by reading or maybe even posting. Hopefully if you come back in to post, the essence of the post will be saying how you have proved to yourself once again that even under the most extreme of circumstances that you are able to stay smoke free by just sticking to your commitment that no matter what else is going on around you that you still know to never take another puff!

Joel
Last edited by Joel on 19 Apr 2009, 04:27, edited 3 times in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Apr 2008, 03:28 #35

There are times where people have emotional issues stemming from family problems, work problems, actual organically based mental illnesses, etc, who will write on the board that they are having overwhelming emotional feelings. Then other people will weigh in saying that they had problems at one time or another when quitting but it got better.

While it may be true that the person offering the advice was just having a reaction to smoking cessation, it may not be true for the person writing now as to his or her mental anguish. Giving the person the idea that it is automatically going to get better when the problem may not be simply from not smoking may be doing the person a real disservice. It may prevent the individual from seeking the real professional help he or she may in fact need for problems that were not in fact quit related.

As it says in our Medical Disclaimer:

This site is not meant to replace the advice of any physician. Do not rely upon any information that you read here at Freedom (or that you obtain through posts, email or links) to replace consultations or advice received by qualified health professionals regarding your own specific situation. The information provided here at Freedom is intended as smoking cessation educational materials only and it should NEVER be construed as medical advice.

If you have any question in your mind regarding any lingering health concern, including depression or mental health, IMMEDIATELY seek medical assistance. If you are not satisfied with the advice being rendered by a physician, you always have the right to obtain another medical opinion. We are not physicians or doctors here at Freedom. We are students and teachers of smoking cessation.

It is also important for you to understand that as a smoking cessation forum Freedom is staffed entirely by cessation educators who are not physicians, pharmacists or dietitians. Further, Freedom's Rules prohibit any member from rendering any medical advice to other members, from giving medication or herbal advice or recommendations, or from giving dieting or exercise advice or recommendations, other than the advice to seek the assistance of trained and qualified health care professionals.

There are organizations and individuals whose sites have disclaimers such as this to simply protect themselves legally. We have this policy because we believe it's right for every individual reading here. We do all we can to make sure that any information or concepts acquired here do not pose medical risks to readers.

When it comes to the treatment or management of any medical condition we sincerely believe that it is best for every person to deal with a qualified medical professional in their real world. The materials, concepts and information shared here allow readers to improve their health, and likely extend the productive years of their lives, by simply making and sticking to a personal commitment to Never Take Another Puff, Dip, or Chew.

Also from above:

Nobody should get the impression that the majority of people become clinically depressed or need medications to deal with the normal depression phase that accompanies initial smoking cessation. The fact is that only a small percentage of people will have a full-blown organic depression occurring just after quitting smoking.

But that fact is not important if you are one of these individuals. What is important is that if you believe you are organically depressed get checked out by your doctor.

Especially if you are a person with a past history of treatment for depression or if your depressive episode is lasting more than a week and is causing a real disruption in your life, get checked out. You may indeed benefit from treatment or maybe your physician will just give you the reassurance that you are really okay. Either way it doesn't hurt to get the situation professionally assessed.

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Nov 2008, 21:09 #36

This site is not meant to replace the advice of any physician. Do not rely upon any information that you read here at Freedom (or that you obtain through posts, email or links) to replace consultations or advice received by qualified health professionals regarding your own specific situation. The information provided here at Freedom is intended as smoking cessation educational materials only and it should NEVER be construed as medical advice.
If you have any question in your mind regarding any lingering health concern, including depression or mental health, IMMEDIATELY seek medical assistance. If you are not satisfied with the advice being rendered by a physician, you always have the right to obtain another medical opinion. We are not physicians or doctors here at Freedom. We are students and teachers of smoking cessation.
It is also important for you to understand that as a smoking cessation forum Freedom is staffed entirely by cessation educators who are not physicians, pharmacists or dietitians. Further, Freedom's Rules prohibit any member from rendering any medical advice to other members, from giving medication or herbal advice or recommendations, or from giving dieting or exercise advice or recommendations, other than the advice to seek the assistance of trained and qualified health care professionals.

There are organizations and individuals whose sites have disclaimers such as this to simply protect themselves legally. We have this policy because we believe it's right for every individual reading here. We do all we can to make sure that any information or concepts acquired here do not pose medical risks to readers.

When it comes to the treatment or management of any medical condition we sincerely believe that it is best for every person to deal with a qualified medical professional in their real world. The materials, concepts and information shared here allow readers to improve their health, and likely extend the productive years of their lives, by simply making and sticking to a personal commitment to Never Take Another Puff, Dip, or Chew.
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Joined: 11 Nov 2008, 19:22

03 Jun 2010, 12:22 #37

 
 
Cigarette smoking and depression:
tests of causal linkages using
a longitudinal birth cohort

 
The British Journal of Psychiatry (2010) 196: 440-446.

 
Joseph M. Boden, PhD, David M. Fergusson, PhD and L. John Horwood, MSc 
Abstract

Background

Research on the comorbidity between cigarette smoking and major depression has not elucidated the pathways by which smoking is associated with depression.

Aims

To examine the causal relationships between smoking and depression via fixed-effects regression and structural equation modelling.

Method

Data were gathered on nicotine-dependence symptoms and depressive symptoms in early adulthood using a birth cohort of over 1000 individuals.

Results

Adjustment for confounding factors revealed persistent significant associations between nicotine-dependence symptoms and depressive symptoms. Structural equation modelling suggested that the best-fitting causal model was one in which nicotine dependence led to increased risk of depression. The findings suggest that the comorbidity between smoking and depression arises from two routes; the first involving common or correlated risk factors and the second a direct path in which smoking increases the risk of depression.

Conclusions

This evidence is consistent with the conclusion that there is a cause and effect relationship between smoking and depression in which cigarette smoking increases the risk of symptoms of depression.
 
http://bjp.rcpsych.org/cg...ntent/abstract/196/6/440









Smoking link to depression By Martin Johnston
4:00 AM Wednesday Jun 2, 2010

Smoking may cause an increased risk of depression, according to a New Zealand study which has followed 1200 people since they were born in 1977.

Smoking and major depression have long been known to be linked.

But which is the primary cause has been unclear, and it is possible that they reinforce each other.

Studies have suggested that some people who have depression smoke as a form of self-medication.

Researchers from Otago University at Christchurch, led by Professor David Ferguson, analysed data collected when participants in their study were in the late teens to mid-20s.

They concluded it is probably smoking that increases the risk of suffering symptoms of major depression, rather than the reverse.

They found that at the age of:

* 18 years - 14 per cent of the study participants were addicted to nicotine and 18 per cent had serious depression.

* 21 years - 25 per cent were addicted and 18 per cent had depression.

* 25 years - 23 per cent were addicted and 14 per cent had depression.

"Overall, those reporting at least five symptoms of nicotine dependence had rates of depressive symptoms that were 2.13 times those of individuals who reported no symptoms of nicotine dependence," says the researchers' paper.

The findings were published yesterday in the British Journal of Psychiatry.

The paper says statistical calculations suggested the cause-and-effect link was one-way, from nicotine addiction to depression.

They found no evidence of a link in the reverse direction, from depression to smoking.

"The reasons for this relationship are not clear," said Professor Ferguson. "However, it's possible that nicotine causes changes to neurotransmitter activity in the brain, leading to an increased risk of depression."

SMOKING RISKS

Smoking is linked to an increased risk of: * Cancer * Heart disease * Stroke * Impotence * Probably severe depression
Story Source Link 

Copyright 2010, APN Holdings NZ Limited
 
Last edited by JohnPolito on 03 Jun 2010, 12:28, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 13 Nov 2008, 14:04

24 Apr 2013, 12:39 #38

Re: New Study: Smoking & Depression
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Research shows quitting smoking often helps depressionApril 2013  - by BeyondBlue.org

Quitting smoking can significantly improve people’s mental health, according to research, which has uncovered a series of important findings.

The beyondblue-funded research underpins a new booklet, Depression and quitting smoking, which addresses the unique challenges that people with depression face when trying to give up.Quit Victoria Executive Director Fiona Sharkie said the perception that people with depression can’t or don’t want to quit is wrong.

“With the right support, not only can people with depression quit, but their depression often improves,” she said. “We know that people often smoke to ease stress or boost their mood, but the opposite is actually true. Research has shown quitting smoking eases depressive symptoms and those effects can last for as long as the smoker stays off the cigarettes.”

The research findings include:

- Smokers are more than twice as likely to report that they regularly feel depressed when compared to ex-smokers who gave up six months earlier.

- Many people with depression quit successfully, but overall are a third less likely to do so than people who aren’t depressed.

beyondblue CEO Kate Carnell said the research has been used to create the free booklet that is aimed at people with depression who want to quit. Ms Carnell said that, despite seeming hard, quitting is the best thing smokers can do for their health.

“We’ve always known the physical benefits of giving up, but this study shows the impact that quitting smoking can also have on people’s moods,” she said. “This study shows that while 37% of smokers say they recently had a prolonged period of feeling down, this number is more than halved to 16% among those who quit six months ago. The figure is 34% for those who try to quit but fail within the first six months, suggesting that even quitting temporarily has some mental health benefits.

“This book advises people with depression that they are capable of giving up cigarettes – just like people who aren’t depressed. It gives information about why they smoke, how to make a plan to quit and strategies they can use to quit once and for all. I urge anyone with depression who smokes to order a copy of the booklet and read it.”

The research was conducted by Dr Catherine Segan from The University of Melbourne’s School of Population and Global Health. For a six-month period, it tracked more than 800 people who contacted Quitline for advice on how to quit, including a quarter with depression.

The research found while people with depression found it more challenging to quit than other people, many were still successful, with one-third having quit successfully six months after first contacting Quitline. This compared with about half of other participants in the research who weren’t depressed.

On the down side, the research also found that 18% of participants with depression reported a significant increase in depression symptoms within two months of quitting compared with 5% of people who had never been depressed. However half of those who had an increase in depression symptoms said they believed it was unrelated to the quit attempt. The research was also unable to draw a direct link between any increase in depressive symptoms and quitting.

Ms Carnell said the findings are a reminder that people with depression who try to quit should do so in consultation with their doctor.

“We know from the research that a third of people with depression have quit successfully six months after first contacting Quitline,” she said. “Quitting can be a challenge for someone with depression, but as this research shows, it can be done.”

Source link: http://www.beyondblue.org.au/media/medi ... depression

Copyright 2013 BeyondBlue



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13 Jun 2013, 23:49 #39

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28 Feb 2014, 16:13 #40

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