No need to apologize

Joel
Joel

April 27th, 2004, 8:09 pm #1

I often see where a longer term member comes in to make a new post and starts out by apologizing for not having posted in a long time. Actually, the vast majority of our successful quitters don't post all that often. If every member who doesn't post too often were all of a sudden to drop on in and apologize the board would be totally flooded. We'd look like one big sorry board.



We often see where a person is celebrating turning silver or gold or off multiple years who drop in and say, "I don't post much anymore but I still drop by and read regularly. Spending time reading is probably more likely to help a person secure his or her quit than posting. When it comes down to it, our real wish is for each individual here is to keep his or her own quit secure.



All members should always know that while their posts are appreciated they are not mandated. We don't want anyone ever feeling a sense of guilt for using our site. If you are coming here to read to secure your own quit you are making us all happy, even if we never hear about it.

Now there are people who are long-term quitters who are in fact frequent posters. We really appreciate all of the work and help of these people who do stick around. You can tell from the posts of these people that they are well beyond the point of feeling insecure about their own quits. They know not to get complacent and they do want to help. If a person has the time and desire to be there for others they are great assets to our board. But for people whose time might be limited, we want them to put their time into securing their own quits more than trying to secure others.

There is one thing that makes our goal a little different than many Internet based sites. We don't want people to sacrifice time from other areas of their lives and getting hooked on the board. (See Crutches to Quit Smoking and Freedom - your journey to comfort - a highly focused forum ) In the beginning few days this is common, where new members really do spend an inordinate amount of time reading and learning and trying to strengthen their resolve. This is during the time period when many people do find their lives centered around not smoking. Over time though, life should not need to be centered around not smoking, it should be centered around living your life. Being really successful means that you have developed the ability of being with family, friends, doing your job, and meeting your normal day to day demands without constantly thinking about smoking or about quitting.

Over the long-term not smoking should still be looked at as a big deal and a major accomplishment but you shouldn't have to spend more than a few minutes on any given day reminding yourself of this fact. (see "I am not going to smoke today!" and Take it one day at a time . We don't want new members or people first looking at our site who are just considering quitting to think that quitting smoking is going to be a major time commitment or something that is going to consume the rest of their lives. Quitting smoking is going to buy you lots of time and allow you the ability to live your life to the fullest.

We know not everyone has time to stop by and write everyday. Some people don't have time to write every week or even every month. But do try to find the time to stop by and read every once in a while. Taking a few minutes to read can help to secure your quit. Securing your quit can help to buy you years and maybe even decades of extra time of a healthier and higher quality life. Make a point of stopping by every now and then to to read and strengthen your commitment and resolve to never take another puff!

Joel

Video version: No need to apologize for not posting for a while

Updated on June 27, 2014 to add video version above.
Last edited by Joel on June 27th, 2014, 11:07 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Joel
Joel

April 29th, 2004, 10:16 pm #2




This post covers the concept of what is and is not enough posting. The priority of every member should be to spend his or her time reading to secure his or her own quit. Once a person is feeling his or her quit is secure for the day, then he or she should feel free to post to help others as much or more importantly as little as time permits. For our newer readers keeping your own quit strong and secure is the priority that you should have set and to help accomplish this goal read as much as you can of how important it is to stay committed to never take another puff!



Joel
Last edited by Joel on June 27th, 2014, 11:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

June 3rd, 2004, 7:40 pm #3

I saw the following comment written today in a post and thought it would be good to place it here:
"I don't post much but I do read alot, so I will be following your progress and silently wishing you the very best in your quits. "

I suspect a lot of our readers would relate and agree with these sentiments. I think every person who writes here has a large number of people out there silently cheering him or her on. What is more important though is that ever person who writes here takes the time and effort to read and learn all he or she can to reinforce why he or she first quit smoking and why he or she still wishes to stay free from his or her dangerous and potentially deadly addiction to nicotine. The way to stay free from smoking and the active nicotine addiction is to simply stay totally committed to never take another puff!

Joel
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Dionne (gold)
Dionne (gold)

June 28th, 2004, 4:00 am #4

Nicely done Joel. Thanks for taking the possible guilt out of not writing for stretches of time. I may write more often than some oldies but it's because I'm sort of marooned in a third world country and have the time! And frankly, there is nothing I think is more interesting to listen to, read of, than someone who has done the work of kicking an addiction.
Of course they fortify my own quit, but it's really wonderful to read a few times a week, of the different people that are willing to step up and do the hard job of saying, "No More. I draw the line here. I want my life to be free. I want the most out of life there is. And smoking comes between me and a well-deserved active lifestyle."
I'll tell ya, people who can kick an addiction never fail to inspire me.

Today is Sunday and I'm full of grace because I am not smoking, still. And tonight I'll smile before going to sleep and say, "Nice Job Diane."

Yours, Dionne, Full of Freedom for 3 years and 8 months.
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Joel
Joel

August 29th, 2004, 10:30 pm #5

From above:

"Spending time reading is probably more likely to help a person secure his or her quit than posting. When it comes down to it, our real wish is for each individual here is to keep his or her own quit secure."
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

August 30th, 2004, 11:27 am #6

There is one thing that makes our goal a little different than many Internet based sites. We don't want people to sacrifice time from other areas of their lives and getting hooked on the board. (See Crutches and Freedom - your journey to comfort - a highly focused forum ) In the beginning few days this is common, where new members really do spend an inordinate amount of time reading and learning and trying to strengthen their resolve. This is during the time period when many people do find their lives centered around not smoking. Over time though, life should not need to be centered around not smoking, it should be centered around living your life. Being really successful means that you have developed the ability of being with family, friends, doing your job, and meeting your normal day to day demands without constantly thinking about smoking or about quitting.

Over the long-term not smoking should still be looked at as a big deal and a major accomplishment but you shouldn't have to spend more than a few minutes on any given day reminding yourself of this fact. (see "I am not going to smoke today!" and Take it one day at a time . We don't want new members or people first looking at our site who are just considering quitting to think that quitting smoking is going to be a major time commitment or something that is going to consume the rest of their lives. Quitting smoking is going to buy you lots of time and allow you the ability to live your life to the fullest.

We know not everyone has time to stop by and write everyday. Some people don't have time to write every week or even every month. But do try to find the time to stop by and read every once in a while. Taking a few minutes to read can help to secure your quit. Securing your quit can help to buy you years and maybe even decades of extra time of a healthier and higher quality life. Make a point of stopping by every now and then to to read and strengthen your commitment and resolve to never take another puff!

Joel



Restored Links
Last edited by GrumpyOMrsS (Gold) on October 15th, 2009, 6:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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justjudi gold
justjudi gold

September 2nd, 2004, 12:39 am #7

Joel, you hit the mark when you said, "Over time though, life should not need to be centered around not smoking, it should be centered around living your life. Being really successful means that you have developed the ability of being with family, friends, doing your job, and meeting your normal day to day demands without constantly thinking about smoking or about quitting."

My quit is a little over 19 mths old, and for the most part, I feel very secure and confident about it. However, during times of stress, I've occasionally thought, "If I only still smoked, I could suppress this *stuff* with a cigarette and pretend I didn't have to deal with it!" These are the times I log in and read or maybe post something if I think I can offer insight or support to a newer member.

I send new people here every chance I get, and I recommend the site to every smoker I know, whether I'm a regular visitor or not. I'm no longer afraid to tell them I don't think that "cutting back" is helping at all (especially since they all work their way back up to the original # of cigs daily, but that's another story). There is so much knowledge and support to be shared here, but there is also a whole world out there and an enormous array of healthy activities we can participate in now that we've gotten that horrid monkey off our backs.

thanks for the good thoughts and for just being here, and much success to all of you!
Judi
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zwan girl3
zwan girl3

September 4th, 2004, 7:23 am #8

Thanks Joel. I sensed it was for me, before I even clicked. That's one thing I forgot to mention in my update is how awesome it is to be able to get back to your life, without CONSTANTLY thinking about smoking, or quitting for that matter. You've truly saved so many lives with your work. God bless you.
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Joel
Joel

November 15th, 2004, 9:59 am #9

From the string "Where is..."
From: Joel (Original Message) Sent: 8/16/2004 9:39 AM
I just saw a case of one member asking where another member was since he or she had not posted in a few weeks.
I am lifting the comment below from the string "Come share your strength, come recognize your vulnerabilities?" In it we explain how we never want to put any undo pressure on any member to come and post. It is up to each and every member himself or herself to post whenever he or she wants to. We do hope though that members and non-members alike stop on by and read every now and then as time permits. Keeping ones own quit strong and secure is of paramount importance by all people who have quit smoking.

The practice of asking where a particular member is putting unwanted pressure on that person to post. It is also setting up a situation that can pose a real problem. There are times when a person is gone for weeks or even months at a time. If another member puts up a post asking where is so and so, there is a good chance the person will never see it and thus not respond. This can set up the perception that the person relapsed. There are times when this may be the case, but there are just as many times if not more where it was not the case. Actually, as I think back to the times when we have seen a post like "Where is what's his name," in most cases we knew the person was still off smoking, but it is not up to us to report on any specific member. Whenever we see posts come up asking about another member we are going to pull that post.

I should also point out that there are people who occasionally leave Freedom who are still not smoking. As some people grow more comfortable in their quits (see Freedom - your journey to comfort - a highly focused forum)) they find our style of operation to restrictive. Sometimes a person will pull his or her own membership because of our structure, at other times we have pulled posting privileges of members because they were trying to shape Freedom's style into one that was more relaxed and social and better fitting their current state of being. Such actions though will weaken the level of focus that we keep at Freedom and we believe that level of focus is more important than the enjoyment of any particular person or even groups of people. So there are times when a person is no longer a member and thus cannot respond to a request for information. If a person is no longer a member it may mean many things and there is no way to know for sure. Even at times when we know the status of an individual the managers won't divulge that information unless that member or past member expressly tells us that they want us to pass along his or her information.

In summary, it is impossible to know for sure the status of a person who is not posting. When it comes down to it though, the only one person any member should be focusing on is himself or herself. The people who any member should be giving assistance to or looking to support are people who are expressly asking for such help. Put all available time you have into securing your own quit and put any extra time you have at the site into helping our new members or even a longer-term member who is asking for help. As I said, it is impossible to know for sure the status of a person who is not posting. The only thing that you can know for sure though is that your quit will stay strong and secure whether you are a member or not, or, whether you ever post or not just as long as you always remember to stick to the commitment you made to yourself to never take another puff!

Last edited by Joel on October 15th, 2009, 6:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

February 3rd, 2005, 11:53 pm #10

We know not everyone has time to stop by and write everyday. Some people don't have time to write every week or even every month. But do try to find the time to stop by and read every once in a while. Taking a few minutes to read can help to secure your quit. Securing your quit can help to buy you years and maybe even decades of extra time of a healthier and higher quality life. Make a point of stopping by every now and then to to read and strengthen your commitment and resolve to never take another puff! Joel
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Joel
Joel

May 2nd, 2005, 10:47 pm #11

I didn't want to create any confusion that we are starting to require members to post. We had an incident where a member joined last week, did a single introductory post which got a number of replies that went unacknowledged, then, a few days later put up a question about cravings that got plenty of answers and offer for support that also went unacknowledged for two days now.

While we don't require that any member posts on any kind of regular basis, if a member does post a question of concern and gets answers or help, that person should at least acknowledge that the question or concerned has been answered.

All longer-term members should still feel no pressure to have to post, yet their posts are always welcome. New members are not required to ever post either, yet know that if you are a newer member and have no intention to post that you may very well be taking away a membership slot from others who wish to actively participate at Freedom.

The only reason to apply for membership at Freedom is to be able to post. All non-members have full access to all of the materials that we have made available at Freedom and at www.whyquit.com. If the only reason a person applies for membership is just to ask an occasional question it would be better to just email your questions to [url=mailto:managers@whyquit.com]managers@whyquit.com[/url].

Again, for our longer-term members:

There is one thing that makes our goal a little different than many Internet based sites. We don't want people to sacrifice time from other areas of their lives and getting hooked on the board. (See Crutches and Freedom - your journey to comfort - a highly focused forum) In the beginning few days this is common, where new members really do spend an inordinate amount of time reading and learning and trying to strengthen their resolve. This is during the time period when many people do find their lives centered around not smoking. Over time though, life should not need to be centered around not smoking, it should be centered around living your life. Being really successful means that you have developed the ability of being with family, friends, doing your job, and meeting your normal day to day demands without constantly thinking about smoking or about quitting. Over the long-term not smoking should still be looked at as a big deal and a major accomplishment but you shouldn't have to spend more than a few minutes on any given day reminding yourself of this fact. (see "I am not going to smoke today!" and Take it one day at a time. We don't want new members or people first looking at our site who are just considering quitting to think that quitting smoking is going to be a major time commitment or something that is going to consume the rest of their lives. Quitting smoking is going to buy you lots of time and allow you the ability to live your life to the fullest.

We know not everyone has time to stop by and write everyday. Some people don't have time to write every week or even every month. But do try to find the time to stop by and read every once in a while. Taking a few minutes to read can help to secure your quit. Securing your quit can help to buy you years and maybe even decades of extra time of a healthier and higher quality life. Make a point of stopping by every now and then to to read and strengthen your commitment and resolve to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

September 17th, 2005, 11:56 pm #12

I had a typo in the post above and so I deleted it. Here is what it should have said:
I wrote some new comments in the string For members not celebrating an important milestone today...
I didn't want it to appear that we were putting undo pressure on people to post their milestones, as this string talks about that we don't want people to feel any pressure at all about posting. At the same time I want people to recognize that simple posts can go on to help others. If you don't have the time or inclination to post an any given time, that is fine. There will likely be others posting. If you do though know your words are likely helping to inspire others to realize that maybe they can acheive success too by making and sticking to a personal commitment to never take another puff.
Joel
Again, from the string For members not celebrating an important milestone today... :
We have lots of people celebrating lots of different milestones, which is really great. As this post talks about though, every one reading here who has not smoked in the last 24 hours is working at and accomplishing a life-saving feat.
I've had a few people write me over the past few months saying that at times there just seem to be a lot of people posting celebrating the fact that they have quit smoking and have significant time periods of varying lengths under their belts. I think sometimes the people pointing this out seem to think that at times there are just too many of these posts on the board. I am not sure if it is really possible to have too many of these posts though.
It is important for people who are just thinking about quitting to see that quitting is possible, and more importantly, that long term success is possible. There are lots of people who say they know that they can quit for a day or two, or maybe even weeks or months, but who somehow feel that they don't believe that they can quit for really long term time periods. Our longer term posters show that long term success is really possible.
Also it is important to note that people who write saying they are off for months, a year, or numerous years, are not people who were locked up prisoners somewhere who faced no smoking temptations, problems or difficult circumstances in the time period that they have been quit. Whenever you see a post from a person who simply says that they have been off for some lengthy time period, it is safe to assume that these people have faced many little trials and tribulations of every day life, and that for people who are off really long time periods, they may have even faced some pretty major problems--like job losses, economic set backs, the illness of loved ones, and maybe even the death of family members, and yet, they still have their quits intact.
So when someone writes that they are celebrating a time period without smoking, try to read into the statement more than it says. These people have not only quit smoking for that time period--but they have proven to themselves and to others that they have continued to live their lives during that time period, probably a more healthy, productive and overall more satisfying life because they made and stuck to a personal commitment to never take another puff.
Joel
Last edited by Joel on October 15th, 2009, 6:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

August 14th, 2006, 1:30 am #13

From above:

We know not everyone has time to stop by and write everyday. Some people don't have time to write every week or even every month. But do try to find the time to stop by and read every once in a while. Taking a few minutes to read can help to secure your quit. Securing your quit can help to buy you years and maybe even decades of extra time of a healthier and higher quality life. Make a point of stopping by every now and then to to read and strengthen your commitment and resolve to never take another puff!

Joel

Additional commentary for today:

I see where two people who don't come by much posted in the past few hours. One of them used to be here a lot, but as can be seen he doesn't post as much any more and really isn't reading here much any more either. It really is fine though because for all practical purposes, from what he wrote you can see that he doesn't think much about smoking anymore and I think all who know him realize that he really has learned all of our lessons very well and they are a permanent part of him. His quit has been strong for years now and I think if for some reason he ever felt like he was thinking about smoking more he would be back in a flash and reading away.

The second situation is a person who said that she only pops in once in a while, but who often thinks of the group. As this article discusses, the person has nothing to feel guilty about as far as not posting. Her not taking time to stop in and read and learn as much as she can though is a different situation for from the way her post reads she is struggling now more than she may need to be.

Her comment about thinking of the group a lot may be part of the problem. Thinking of the group or individuals on the board is not what will really help people secure their quits over the long-term. It is thinking about why a person originally wanted to quit and why a person still wants to stay off that is going to keep a person's resolve strong.

Anyone struggling should focus their attention on the lessons at www.whyquit.com and going through the various message boards that we have set up here at Freedom, especially the "Craves and thoughts" board, the "Prevent Relapse" board and the "Reasons to Quit" board. Along with the articles in these boards there is also lots of additional commentaries, all of them hitting home the point of why it was so important to quit in the first place and why it is still so important to stay off. They will all also help to hit home the one main point that to keep this quit alive and well, as well as to keep yourself alive and well with it is still as simple as reaffirming and sticking to your personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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Joel
Joel

December 26th, 2006, 9:55 pm #14

I recently noticed that quite a few people who used to be very regularly active posters had stopped by just to say hello. Sometimes I feel as if some people feel awkward posting because they have been away for so long. No one should feel awkward about this. Stopping by sporadically and just doing a quick hello can deliver a very powerful message of how life does go on without smoking and how over time people will not feel tethered to the board.

As this string discusses no one should feel pressured about having to post and also, no one should feel awkward about posting just because they have not posted in a long time. Your message can still pack a powerful puff to new readers.

It is neither the level of participation or your time commitment to the board that is going to make or break your quit. The thing that will ultimately determine your ability for long term success is still just sticking to your own personal commitment to never take another puff.
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Joel
Joel

February 15th, 2007, 7:24 pm #15

I saw a few posts referencing the idea that a few members feel that they were spending too much time reading at Freedom. The truth is, after the first few days we don't think people need to be spending an inordinate amount of their time at this site or any quit smoking site in order to sustain their quits. I am going to kick up a few posts that address this issue.

From above:

There is one thing that makes our goal a little different than many Internet based sites. We don't want people to sacrifice time from other areas of their lives and getting hooked on the board. (See Crutches and Freedom - your journey to comfort - a highly focused forum) In the beginning few days this is common, where new members really do spend an inordinate amount of time reading and learning and trying to strengthen their resolve. This is during the time period when many people do find their lives centered around not smoking. Over time though, life should not need to be centered around not smoking, it should be centered around living your life. Being really successful means that you have developed the ability of being with family, friends, doing your job, and meeting your normal day to day demands without constantly thinking about smoking or about quitting.
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Joel
Joel

February 15th, 2007, 8:06 pm #16

I saw a few posts referencing the idea that a few members feel that they were spending too much time reading at Freedom. The truth is, after the first few days we don't think people need to be spending an inordinate amount of their time at this site or any quit smoking site in order to sustain their quits. I am going to kick up a few posts that address this issue.

From above:

There is one thing that makes our goal a little different than many Internet based sites. We don't want people to sacrifice time from other areas of their lives and getting hooked on the board. (See Crutches and Freedom - your journey to comfort - a highly focused forum) In the beginning few days this is common, where new members really do spend an inordinate amount of time reading and learning and trying to strengthen their resolve. This is during the time period when many people do find their lives centered around not smoking. Over time though, life should not need to be centered around not smoking, it should be centered around living your life. Being really successful means that you have developed the ability of being with family, friends, doing your job, and meeting your normal day to day demands without constantly thinking about smoking or about quitting.

Also, below is a link to a page about a series of our videos that address the issue of how to reinforce your resolve over the long-term. The first referred to video is very specific on how people should be able to get on with their lives after the first couple of weeks while having to commit very little time to quitting.




Getting on with the rest of your life
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GailMarie481
GailMarie481

February 16th, 2007, 1:46 am #17

Hi
I'd just like to say that I liked this posting and feel like you are a person who really does care about helping people and helping to bring success to people who want to quit smoking. I find it very touching, especially when reading certain things, example being " We don't want anyone ever feeling a sense of guilt for using our site. If you are coming here to read to secure your own quit you are making us all happy, even if we never hear about it." as when people care about others without wanting anything more than the rewards of having helped another person in a real way to help his/her self, I kinda get teary-eyed...sheesh..lol But, it is very touching and you do deserve and get my respect for knowing that way of things.

As for spending time here, I'm figuring a person who wants to learn ballet would be spending time with ballet people learning how to spin and wear a tutu, and a person wanting to be a doctor would spend time taking med courses and likely be with other students who are learning and learning from teachers of medicine. I want to remain a non-smoker - duh, and even when I've become an expert at it. lol
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Joel
Joel

February 16th, 2007, 1:58 am #18

There are many things in life that require lots of research and lots of practice in order to become proficient or to become an expert. The reason of course is the level of complexities associated with specific activities or professions. Fortunately, quitting smoking or sustaining a quit is not really a complicated process. In fact it is quite simple. It is as simple as making and sticking to a personal commitment to never take another puff.

The preface and acknowledgement in the book, Never Take Another Puff addresses this issue:
Preface
Never take another puff
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Joel
Joel

January 4th, 2008, 4:54 am #19

I see we have some people stopping on by who have not been around for a while because it is just after New Years or because they are celebrating anniversaries because they had New Year based quits.

I think sometimes people seem to feel awkward about posting because they have not posted in a while. There is no need for anyone to feel awkward about posting out of the blue even if they had not posted in months or even years. As it says above:

From above:

We know not everyone has time to stop by and write everyday. Some people don't have time to write every week or even every month. But do try to find the time to stop by and read every once in a while. Taking a few minutes to read can help to secure your quit. Securing your quit can help to buy you years and maybe even decades of extra time of a healthier and higher quality life. Make a point of stopping by every now and then to to read and strengthen your commitment and resolve to never take another puff!

Joel
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FreedomNicotine
FreedomNicotine

November 8th, 2009, 12:52 pm #20

From above:

I saw a post from a new member who said she won't be posting much. Just letting her know that this is not a problem for us. As it says above:
There is one thing that makes our goal a little different than many Internet based sites. We don't want people to sacrifice time from other areas of their lives and getting hooked on the board. (See Crutches to Quit Smoking and Freedom - Your Journey to Comfort In the beginning few days this is common, where new members really do spend an inordinate amount of time reading and learning and trying to strengthen their resolve. This is during the time period when many people do find their lives centered around not smoking. Over time though, life should not need to be centered around not smoking, it should be centered around living your life. Being really successful means that you have developed the ability of being with family, friends, doing your job, and meeting your normal day to day demands without constantly thinking about smoking or about quitting.

Over the long-term not smoking should still be looked at as a big deal and a major accomplishment but you shouldn't have to spend more than a few minutes on any given day reminding yourself of this fact. (see "I am not going to smoke today!" and One day at a time . We don't want new members or people first looking at our site who are just considering quitting to think that quitting smoking is going to be a major time commitment or something that is going to consume the rest of their lives. Quitting smoking is going to buy you lots of time and allow you the ability to live your life to the fullest.

We know not everyone has time to stop by and write everyday. Some people don't have time to write every week or even every month. But do try to find the time to stop by and read every once in a while. Taking a few minutes to read can help to secure your quit. Securing your quit can help to buy you years and maybe even decades of extra time of a healthier and higher quality life. Make a point of stopping by every now and then to to read and strengthen your commitment and resolve to never take another puff!

Joel

Also from above:

Below is a link to a page about a series of our videos that address the issue of how to reinforce your resolve over the long-term. The first referred to video is very specific on how people should be able to get on with their lives after the first couple of weeks while having to commit very little time to quitting.


http://www.whyquit.com/joel/restoflife.htm href="http://www.whyquit.com/joel/restoflife.htm" target=_top>Getting on with the rest of your life
Last edited by FreedomNicotine on November 8th, 2009, 1:59 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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FreedomNicotine
FreedomNicotine

January 1st, 2010, 10:50 pm #21

From above:

I see we have some people stopping on by who have not been around for a while because it is just after New Years or because they are celebrating anniversaries because they had New Year based quits.


I think sometimes people seem to feel awkward about posting because they have not posted in a while. There is no need for anyone to feel awkward about posting out of the blue even if they had not posted in months or even years. As it says above:


We know not everyone has time to stop by and write everyday. Some people don't have time to write every week or even every month. But do try to find the time to stop by and read every once in a while. Taking a few minutes to read can help to secure your quit. Securing your quit can help to buy you years and maybe even decades of extra time of a healthier and higher quality life. Make a point of stopping by every now and then to to read and strengthen your commitment and resolve to never take another puff!

Joel
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