Nicotine vs. Heroin

Farnk Gold
Farnk Gold

9:14 PM - Oct 04, 2002 #1

As I read over the materials here, I see a LOT of truth. The type of truth we all KNOW is truth, but deny anyway. I know because I've done it many times. In fact, I quit smoking just a couple of months ago! I went about 4 days. Then I took a puff. "Just one won't hurt me," I thought, knowing all the while that I CAN'T control how much and how often. I KNEW that one puff would lead to more, but I gave in and bummed one off a friend. ****, I gave up 4 days and had to start at zero again. Might as well buy a pack and control my smoking to only two a day. Yeah, right! Finished the pack within two days and was back to 1.5 packs a day again. Lesson: Joel's TRUTH, "Never Take Another Puff"
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Joel
Joel

9:35 PM - Oct 04, 2002 #2

Are you a nicotine junkie?
The one attribute that shows the addictive nature of nicotine
is not how hard or how easy it is to quit, nor is it
how hard or easy it is for an individual to stay off smoking.
The one true property that shows the power of the addiction
is that no matter how long a person is off, one puff and that
quit can go out the window.
Don't ever try to prove to yourself that you were not addicted.
You were addicted to nicotine all of the years you used it and
you are addicted to it today too. But as an ex-smoker the
addiction becomes asymptomatic. To keep it that way and
to basically stay in control always remember to
Never Take Another Puff!
Joel
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

9:35 PM - Oct 04, 2002 #3

This is the gif I use Frank and I know that Joel has one too because I used his in both my clinic and seminar PowerPoint presentations. Thanks for sharing your wonderful insights. In presenting all the info on heroin/nicotine comparisons at WhyQuit's Addiction 101 link I've had no choice but to rely upon science, governments and the conclusions of others. It's sad yet also reassuring that every once in a while we have a member who has recoved from heroin dependency let the group know that the addiction and recovery warning label on Canadian cigarettes is true. Thanks Frank! If you've got a better image you can email me I'll be happy to get on my hands and knees and beg Mrs.Toast (Melissa) to doctor it up for us. Today is doable Frank! Breathe deep, hug hard, live long! John
The above image is located in the Drug Addiction photo album and as other images you'll find, is available for use by all members when posting.
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Joel
Joel

9:49 PM - Oct 04, 2002 #4

Hello again Frank:

I see John just brought up the other image too. Your message of addiction is important and I am glad we have someone who can speak on the issue who has had multiple addictions and can shed some first hand experiences and insights on the topic.

One other thing that I wanted to comment on from your post is about how cigarettes are a terrible waste of time and the idea of "smoking breaks." It is amazing what the logic of a smoker is in regarding these little breaks. It starts with a smoker popping into drug withdrawal, breaking his or her train of thought or physical stride, and then saying or thinking to himself or herself, "Oh, I think I need a break, I better go get a cigarette."

What you will soon realize after quitting is that you will all of a sudden start projects and then follow them through to completion without taking these breaks. You will generally get them done significantly faster and more accurately for you won't have those constant breaks distracting you from the projects. Soon you will realize the truth of what smoking was doing to you time wise all those years.

It was never that you were needing a break and thus going for cigarettes. It was that you were NEEDING cigarettes and then having to take breaks. The week you quit your efficiency may suffer, but you will make up for that lost time in a matter of days, and soon you will find yourself a more efficient person for the rest of your life.

To keep this newfound efficiency, as well as all of the other benefits of no longer being controlled by cigarettes is as simple as always remembering now to never take another puff!

Joel
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marty (gold)
marty (gold)

10:05 PM - Oct 04, 2002 #5

Hello Frank, and welcome to Freedom

That's a powerful message you posted. It's strange, but in my smoking days I always used to read about drug addicts, and see movies about them, and I always used to thank God that I wasn't "one of them". I grew up in the 1960's, when it seemed that everyone was experimenting with cannabis and LSD, and then cocaine and heroin, and Iused to take a certain pride in having resisted that pervading drug culture. Oh boy, was I ever deluding myself !!!!

It was only so much later that I realized I was a fully paid-up subscriber to the drug culture of my youth .... but my drug was a socially (and politically) approved drug called nicotine. In later years, I discovered that many of my friends and acquantances from the 60s, whom I used to despise for their drug usage, had quit their drugs totally, while I was still inescapably hooked on mine. I guess that's when I discovered the truth in what you have said about the strength of nicotine addiction.

And here we are, you and I, representing the affirmation of the power of the human spirit. Two people who have lived in the abyss of addiction, and whose inner voice has told them that there is a better way. Two people who have met through the power of that spirit, and the strength of a commitment to find that better way, and to live a life as it was meant to be lived.

Thanks for joining us, Frank, and thanks for your insight.

Marty
NOT A PUFF for one year, ten months, three days: 12111 cigarettes not smoked saving $4,238.88: LIFE SAVED 6 weeks
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Farnk Gold
Farnk Gold

10:07 PM - Oct 04, 2002 #6

Yikes! I didn't want to sound like a Know-It-All. I certainly do not! If Mrs. Toast is our graphics doctor and she accepts this mission, the angle is all that needs to be changed. Even more so than in Joel's photo.
And Joel - you literally brought a tear to my eye with the statement, "one puff and that quit can go out the window." It's the God's honest truth. I know. I lived it.
I realized that I didn't mention that even after the rehab, I slipped. About two weeks after leaving, I thought, "Just one won't hurt me. I can control it now." Yeah, right! I purchased on bag and went back that same night for three more bags. I continued for a few days, realized that you don't get a second chance in a rehab, so I had to cold turkey it. I thank God for giving me a third chance at life. 16 years now and it's still a reality... one is too many... and the same goes with puffing!
Frank... hours away from ONE FULL WEEK
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Lilac (Bronze)
Lilac (Bronze)

10:10 PM - Oct 04, 2002 #7

Hey, Frank,
Worth waiting a much longer time for. Inspirational in it's candor and humility. Thank you for an unforgettable post.
I have always wondered at the comparison between a heroin and a nicotine addiction and ease or(unease) of defeating the addiction.
Take care, Lilac 2m$w
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Rickgoldx5
Rickgoldx5

10:15 PM - Oct 04, 2002 #8

Welcome to Freedom Frank!
I too have a second addiction and I remember my doctor asking me which was harder to quit alcohol or cigs? I looked at him and without hesitation I said cigs!
I drank for many years and have been off it for 15yrs. Today is my 5th month off the nicotine and it sure is Freedom. So congrats, read, keep posting and one day at a time you will know the benifits of a smoke free life!
YQB
Rick
Five months, 2 hours, 15 minutes and 42 seconds. 12553 cigarettes not smoked, saving $1,876.78. Life saved: 6 weeks, 1 day, 14 hours, 5 minutes.
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Toast (GOLD )
Toast (GOLD )

10:16 PM - Oct 04, 2002 #9

Ohhhh! I love begging!

Really tho, send anything along and I'll get to it sooner than later.

Welcome Frank!

Melissa
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Joel
Joel

10:27 PM - Oct 04, 2002 #10

Here Frank:

I think you will find this one real enlightening: Some new findings on Nicotine Addiction
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SandyBob GOLD
SandyBob GOLD

2:03 AM - Oct 05, 2002 #11

Hi Farnk and Welcome To Freedom.

Thank you for sharing.

Whether it's nicotine, herion, alcohol, etc . . . and addiction is an addiction.

I think maybe dealing with a past addiction and recovering has made it a bit easier to learn this quiting smoking thing. We already know the law of addiction.

Glad you here.

SandyBob
almost 4 months
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BillW Gold.ffn
BillW Gold.ffn

8:35 AM - Oct 05, 2002 #12

Hi Farnk, and welcome to Freedom!

Thank you for one of the most thoughtful and sobering first posts here in a long while. It really brought home for me the seriousness of this fight, and the magnitude of this addiction.

Anyways...if you've been reading, then thats the first step to getting beyond those 4 day "show" quits. And by my calculation, you are now a
Glory Week Gradutate!!!
Yep....we do that kind of stuff here, too. It marks the boundary between physical and psychological withdrawal....one of the things that makes nicotine tough as a drug of addiction.
Yell for help if you need us...we'll be here. Meanwhile, read, compadre, read!
BillW 7 months +
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Toast (GOLD )
Toast (GOLD )

10:13 AM - Oct 05, 2002 #13


Angle might still be a tad off ...
M
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David Gold
David Gold

11:13 AM - Oct 05, 2002 #14

Welcome to Freedom Farnk. I am glad you're here.

That was one heck of a first post. I must admit that I never thought of cigarettes as addicting but I was wrong as I could be.

Thanks for being here.

David
3 months +
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Farnk Gold
Farnk Gold

6:53 PM - Oct 05, 2002 #15

Toast! I'm so surprised! You did an excellent job on the graphic! Thank You.

I think one of the biggest shames in this world is the availability of addicting materials, legal and illegal. Illegal are harder to do because they are harder to acquire. Legal drugs (e.g., cigarettes, alcohol, etc) can be picked up almost anywhere at any time. You can buy in a quantity that suits your needs (a cold mug, a six pack, a shot, a pack or a carton...) and come back at anytime for more without risk. Trying to buy a bag of dope on the street is much, much harder and far more risky.

If only I knew then what I knew now, I'd never have started smoking. My father never discouraged it. It was 'cool' for his son to be smoking with him. Even after his first (of many) heart attack, he continued to smoke. It finally killed him at age 50... too young. Heart disease. I was 21. And my mother died of lung cancer at 56 (I was 29). Non-smoke related type of cancer, but to see her deteriorate over 6 months... strokes from chemotherapy, etc, until she more or less shrivelled up to nothing and died. I don't want that happening to me. And I don't want to cause it on my wife & children.
Frank
I have chosen not to smoke for 1 Week 15 Hours 5 Minutes 50 Seconds.
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RIVERDOGgold
RIVERDOGgold

8:03 PM - Oct 05, 2002 #16

Big Big Big Big WELCOME Frank !!!!! I would like to write more when I get time but I gotta run to work.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

9:40 PM - Oct 05, 2002 #17

Thanks Melissa ; ) I can't even remember where I found that original image back in 1999 but do recall doing a bit of cropping work and transforming it into black and white before sticking in the packs and trying to make the needle look like a cigarette. From what Frank says about the angle, I guess the original shot was stagged too : )) In a way that makes me feel better.
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Joel
Joel

12:15 AM - Nov 24, 2002 #18

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Joel
Joel

1:51 AM - Dec 12, 2002 #19

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MareBear GOLD
MareBear GOLD

11:25 PM - Dec 12, 2002 #20

Hi Frank,

I know I'm a couple months late in welcoming you to Freedom--I just read your very powerful first post. Congratulations on becoming Double Green--you are very close to Bronze!

Just wanted to say that you can achieve comfort Frank. Yes, it can be a struggle but it is very worth it. Your determination will make all the difference.

I printed out a sign that says "One is too many; a thousand is not enough" and put it by my computer. A very apt statement in this forum.

Welcome again Frank. It's great to have you here!

YQS-
MareBear

Free for: 6M 2W. 3950 unsmoked / $651.84 saved / "alive with pleasure" for 1W 6D 17h 10m longer!
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Joel
Joel

10:50 PM - Feb 14, 2003 #21

I see Frank is celebrating his three-month anniversary being smoke free. I thought it would be a good time to bring up his original string here. Frank discussed in his three-month post today how it was pretty hard for quite a while and now how comfort finally starting to set in. I am pretty sure the day Frank started posting I started bringing up quite a few posts addressing how that when I have people who are in recovery from other addictions that they often have a harder time than "average." They are not only trying to break free from a primary addiction, they are often trying to break free from the crutch used in another addiction. While they often have a harder time, they are usually more successful at quitting for they in deed understand the concept and the laws of addiction. If not they would not be in recovery from their other drug of choice but rather they would be very actively using.



I am mentioning this here for a two-fold purpose. One is to acknowledge how happy I am to see Frank still around and reading and now posting. I am glad when I find out anyone is still around reading whether they are posting or not. I also want to make it clear that even people who by other life circumstances may have a harder time in quitting, that they can still be successful and eventually reach states of comfort that they may never have believed were going to happen for themselves.

Thanks Frank for showing others that there is life after smoking and that there is continued recovery after smoking. As was done in your original string here, you helped give us all a lesson in drug addiction. The lesson you have shared is that no matter how much a person may believe that he or she can never overcome an addiction, that quitting is possible and long-term success is achievable as long as you always remember what you are fighting and remember that to win the fight is as easy as just always knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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wcsdancer (Gold)
wcsdancer (Gold)

12:28 AM - Feb 15, 2003 #22

"One is too many, and a thousand is not enough."
This is one of the most powerful statements I have read since joining Freedom. And your post was amazing. Thank you Frank for taking the time to share the most personal and painful experiences in your life. I know many will benefit from your truths.
I have a question...do you "miss" smoking like you've "missed" heroin? I have learned not to miss smoking/nicotine by constant mental repitition of the reasons I quit. Any time a pleasant memory of smoking popped up, I immediately replaced it with the ugly truth. At this point, the fantasy/charm/seduction of smoking has been obliterated for me. And I am determined to Never Take Another Puff. Does it work the same way with heroin?
Thanks again for your original post Frank. Since I missed your bronze celebration I send you my CONGRATULATIONS today, even though a little belated. You are an amazing survivor! I'm proud to call you my "quit bro".
*Candy*
1 Year 3 Months 5 Days 12 Hours 30 Minutes 29 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 5550. Money saved: $1,248.81.
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Joel
Joel

7:32 PM - Apr 01, 2003 #23

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IrishLotus GOLD
IrishLotus GOLD

12:51 AM - Oct 23, 2003 #24

For Shay...

Oh, and I found it interesting that everyone who first responded to this thread (over a year ago) has since gone gold. Congratulations all...and good luck Shay!
Lotus
Gold CLub!
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Shay
Shay

3:47 AM - Oct 24, 2003 #25

Thanks Lotus, still hangin in there at 5 days 15 minutes. My body has stopped screaming. The worst is definitely over as far as pain goes, but the committee in my head has other ideas. I was laid-off from my job last Monday and have now decided to change everything. Since quitting nicotine all my goals and desires have changed, is this normal? I am now faced with the pressure of trying to find a new job while quitting smoking, or staying quit, I should say. The two seem slightly incompatible for me, lol. There is nothing I abhor more than looking for a new job.

Anyway, a few minutes ago my mind suggested that I just go buy a pack and smoke until I find a job. Since I will be up a creek anyway if I don't find a new job soon, might as well make the search easier while smoking. I could just quit again a couple weeks into my new job. But I am determined this time to not smoke, and I thank you Joel for repeating the mantra NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF! I really wish I could have chosen a more rational time to quit, but this is it. And besides, since when have I ever thought rationally? If anyone has any suggestions to make my job search easier, I would really welcome it. Lately it has been nearly impossible for me to speak on the phone, much less put my happy face on and go to an interview.

Shay
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