Nicotine vs. Heroin

Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:08

05 Oct 2002, 02:03 #11

Hi Farnk and Welcome To Freedom.

Thank you for sharing.

Whether it's nicotine, herion, alcohol, etc . . . and addiction is an addiction.

I think maybe dealing with a past addiction and recovering has made it a bit easier to learn this quiting smoking thing. We already know the law of addiction.

Glad you here.

SandyBob
almost 4 months
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

05 Oct 2002, 08:35 #12

Hi Farnk, and welcome to Freedom!

Thank you for one of the most thoughtful and sobering first posts here in a long while. It really brought home for me the seriousness of this fight, and the magnitude of this addiction.

Anyways...if you've been reading, then thats the first step to getting beyond those 4 day "show" quits. And by my calculation, you are now a
Glory Week Gradutate!!!
Yep....we do that kind of stuff here, too. It marks the boundary between physical and psychological withdrawal....one of the things that makes nicotine tough as a drug of addiction.
Yell for help if you need us...we'll be here. Meanwhile, read, compadre, read!
BillW 7 months +
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Oct 2002, 10:13 #13


Angle might still be a tad off ...
M
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

05 Oct 2002, 11:13 #14

Welcome to Freedom Farnk. I am glad you're here.

That was one heck of a first post. I must admit that I never thought of cigarettes as addicting but I was wrong as I could be.

Thanks for being here.

David
3 months +
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:23

05 Oct 2002, 18:53 #15

Toast! I'm so surprised! You did an excellent job on the graphic! Thank You.

I think one of the biggest shames in this world is the availability of addicting materials, legal and illegal. Illegal are harder to do because they are harder to acquire. Legal drugs (e.g., cigarettes, alcohol, etc) can be picked up almost anywhere at any time. You can buy in a quantity that suits your needs (a cold mug, a six pack, a shot, a pack or a carton...) and come back at anytime for more without risk. Trying to buy a bag of dope on the street is much, much harder and far more risky.

If only I knew then what I knew now, I'd never have started smoking. My father never discouraged it. It was 'cool' for his son to be smoking with him. Even after his first (of many) heart attack, he continued to smoke. It finally killed him at age 50... too young. Heart disease. I was 21. And my mother died of lung cancer at 56 (I was 29). Non-smoke related type of cancer, but to see her deteriorate over 6 months... strokes from chemotherapy, etc, until she more or less shrivelled up to nothing and died. I don't want that happening to me. And I don't want to cause it on my wife & children.
Frank
I have chosen not to smoke for 1 Week 15 Hours 5 Minutes 50 Seconds.
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:04

05 Oct 2002, 20:03 #16

Big Big Big Big WELCOME Frank !!!!! I would like to write more when I get time but I gotta run to work.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Oct 2002, 21:40 #17

Thanks Melissa ; ) I can't even remember where I found that original image back in 1999 but do recall doing a bit of cropping work and transforming it into black and white before sticking in the packs and trying to make the needle look like a cigarette. From what Frank says about the angle, I guess the original shot was stagged too : )) In a way that makes me feel better.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Nov 2002, 00:15 #18

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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Dec 2002, 01:51 #19

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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

12 Dec 2002, 23:25 #20

Hi Frank,

I know I'm a couple months late in welcoming you to Freedom--I just read your very powerful first post. Congratulations on becoming Double Green--you are very close to Bronze!

Just wanted to say that you can achieve comfort Frank. Yes, it can be a struggle but it is very worth it. Your determination will make all the difference.

I printed out a sign that says "One is too many; a thousand is not enough" and put it by my computer. A very apt statement in this forum.

Welcome again Frank. It's great to have you here!

YQS-
MareBear

Free for: 6M 2W. 3950 unsmoked / $651.84 saved / "alive with pleasure" for 1W 6D 17h 10m longer!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Feb 2003, 22:50 #21

I see Frank is celebrating his three-month anniversary being smoke free. I thought it would be a good time to bring up his original string here. Frank discussed in his three-month post today how it was pretty hard for quite a while and now how comfort finally starting to set in. I am pretty sure the day Frank started posting I started bringing up quite a few posts addressing how that when I have people who are in recovery from other addictions that they often have a harder time than "average." They are not only trying to break free from a primary addiction, they are often trying to break free from the crutch used in another addiction. While they often have a harder time, they are usually more successful at quitting for they in deed understand the concept and the laws of addiction. If not they would not be in recovery from their other drug of choice but rather they would be very actively using.



I am mentioning this here for a two-fold purpose. One is to acknowledge how happy I am to see Frank still around and reading and now posting. I am glad when I find out anyone is still around reading whether they are posting or not. I also want to make it clear that even people who by other life circumstances may have a harder time in quitting, that they can still be successful and eventually reach states of comfort that they may never have believed were going to happen for themselves.

Thanks Frank for showing others that there is life after smoking and that there is continued recovery after smoking. As was done in your original string here, you helped give us all a lesson in drug addiction. The lesson you have shared is that no matter how much a person may believe that he or she can never overcome an addiction, that quitting is possible and long-term success is achievable as long as you always remember what you are fighting and remember that to win the fight is as easy as just always knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:29

15 Feb 2003, 00:28 #22

"One is too many, and a thousand is not enough."
This is one of the most powerful statements I have read since joining Freedom. And your post was amazing. Thank you Frank for taking the time to share the most personal and painful experiences in your life. I know many will benefit from your truths.
I have a question...do you "miss" smoking like you've "missed" heroin? I have learned not to miss smoking/nicotine by constant mental repitition of the reasons I quit. Any time a pleasant memory of smoking popped up, I immediately replaced it with the ugly truth. At this point, the fantasy/charm/seduction of smoking has been obliterated for me. And I am determined to Never Take Another Puff. Does it work the same way with heroin?
Thanks again for your original post Frank. Since I missed your bronze celebration I send you my CONGRATULATIONS today, even though a little belated. You are an amazing survivor! I'm proud to call you my "quit bro".
*Candy*
1 Year 3 Months 5 Days 12 Hours 30 Minutes 29 Seconds. Cigarettes not smoked: 5550. Money saved: $1,248.81.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 Apr 2003, 19:32 #23

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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

23 Oct 2003, 00:51 #24

For Shay...

Oh, and I found it interesting that everyone who first responded to this thread (over a year ago) has since gone gold. Congratulations all...and good luck Shay!
Lotus
Gold CLub!
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Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 20:36

24 Oct 2003, 03:47 #25

Thanks Lotus, still hangin in there at 5 days 15 minutes. My body has stopped screaming. The worst is definitely over as far as pain goes, but the committee in my head has other ideas. I was laid-off from my job last Monday and have now decided to change everything. Since quitting nicotine all my goals and desires have changed, is this normal? I am now faced with the pressure of trying to find a new job while quitting smoking, or staying quit, I should say. The two seem slightly incompatible for me, lol. There is nothing I abhor more than looking for a new job.

Anyway, a few minutes ago my mind suggested that I just go buy a pack and smoke until I find a job. Since I will be up a creek anyway if I don't find a new job soon, might as well make the search easier while smoking. I could just quit again a couple weeks into my new job. But I am determined this time to not smoke, and I thank you Joel for repeating the mantra NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF! I really wish I could have chosen a more rational time to quit, but this is it. And besides, since when have I ever thought rationally? If anyone has any suggestions to make my job search easier, I would really welcome it. Lately it has been nearly impossible for me to speak on the phone, much less put my happy face on and go to an interview.

Shay
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

24 Oct 2003, 04:12 #26

You're very welcome Shay. Regarding your comment:
Since I will be up a creek anyway if I don't find a new job soon, might as well make the search easier while smoking. I could just quit again a couple weeks into my new job.
Well, that sounds like classic Junkie thinking to me, Shay. Oh, and I like how you called it that "committee in your head" ... that's something that every addict experiences. It's a bargaining that goes back and forth between our inner-junkie (in this case, "the Nicodemon") and our rational "true" self. I would recommend reading OBob's: Last line of defense - not today! if you haven't already. This thread reminds us that WE have the final say when it comes to control of our bodies and our behavior. We don't NEED to do what our inner-junkie tells us to do, not any more, cause as long as we Never Take Another Puff, we are "on this side of the fence". We have the key to our addiction. WE have control. That's what Freedom is all about, Shay. Gaining control. No longer being a slave to our inner-junkie's wants and desires but rather recognizing our true needs and doing what we need to do to make ourselves happy.
I know that you have recognized this thought to quit later as a junkie thought, otherwise you wouldn't have come here and asked about it. Now all you need to do is to practice Embracing those craves and reminding yourself that NOW is as good a time as any to take back your life, and that, since you have already removed nicotine from your body, the "hard part" is over, and there is no point in flushing all that success down the toilet now. You can do this Shay...you ARE doing this. kkeep on keepin on, and keepin on reading here and posting for help as needeed. It works, believe me...
Lotus
FREE for over a year now!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

25 Oct 2003, 07:06 #27

"Go Lotus"! You tell 'em! I liked a lot what and how you said it. You don't pull any punches do you! Shay, we're pulling for you to stay join at the hip with us!
Dionne, free for three years
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Nov 2003, 22:43 #28

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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

20 Jan 2004, 23:43 #29

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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Mar 2004, 18:32 #30

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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Mar 2004, 06:33 #31

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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Jul 2004, 05:37 #32

I want to make it clear that even people who by other life circumstances may have a harder time in quitting, that they can still be successful and eventually reach states of comfort that they may never have believed were going to happen for themselves. Thanks Frank for showing others that there is life after smoking and that there is continued recovery after smoking. As was done in your original string here, you helped give us all a lesson in drug addiction. The lesson you have shared is that no matter how much a person may believe that he or she can never overcome an addiction, that quitting is possible and long-term success is achievable as long as you always remember what you are fighting and remember that to win the fight is as easy as just always knowing to never take another puff!
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

27 Jul 2004, 11:30 #33

I love that saying. One is too many, a thousand is not enough" How true.

Frank, thank you for this lovely thread. Its inspiring.

Aida

one month free and going.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

17 Aug 2004, 21:46 #34

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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

17 Aug 2004, 21:47 #35

Are you a nicotine junkie?
The one attribute that shows the addictive nature of nicotine
is not how hard or how easy it is to quit, nor is it
how hard or easy it is for an individual to stay off smoking.
The one true property that shows the power of the addiction
is that no matter how long a person is off, one puff and that
quit can go out the window.
Don't ever try to prove to yourself that you were not addicted.
You were addicted to nicotine all of the years you used it and
you are addicted to it today too. But as an ex-smoker the
addiction becomes asymptomatic. To keep it that way and
to basically stay in control always remember to
Never Take Another Puff!
Joel
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