Nicotine Cessation Tips

Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

12 Jan 2008, 23:31 #11

Subconscious Trigger Extinguishment - As mentioned, we conditioned our subconscious mind to expect nicotine replenishment when encountering certain locations, times, events, people or emotions. Be prepared for each such cue to trigger a brief crave episode as the subconscious mind sounds the body's fight or flight survival alarm. Remember, it is impossible for any trigger to cause relapse so long as nicotine does not enter the bloodstream. Take heart, most triggers are reconditioned and extinguished by a single encounter during which the subconscious mind fails to receive the expected result - nicotine. See each crave episode as an opportunity to receive a reward, the return of yet another aspect of life.

Crave Episodes Less than Three Minutes - In contrast to conscious thought fixation (the "nice juicy steak" type thinking that can last as long as you have the ability to maintain your focus), no subconsciously triggered crave episode will last longer than three minutes.
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Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

08 Feb 2008, 08:11 #12

Withdrawal Symptoms - As strange as it sounds, withdrawal symptoms are good not bad for they are true signs of healing of the brain, mind, and body. Within reason, it is fairly safe to blame most of what you'll feel during the first three days on quitting. But after that you need to listen closely to your body and if at all concerned get seen and evaluated. If you must, blame symptoms on where you have been, not where you are going.

Possible Hidden Health Conditions - Each puff of smoke contained more than 4,000 chemicals, while spit tobacco delivered up to 3,000. One or more of these chemicals may have been masking an underlying hidden health problem such as a thyroid condition (iodine) or breathing problems in smokers, including asthma (bronchiodialiators). Tobacco chemicals may also have been interacting with medications you were already taking and an adjustment may be necessary. Stay alert and get seen if at all concerned.
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Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

10 Mar 2008, 20:22 #13

No Legitimate Excuse for Relapse - Fully recognize that nicotine use cannot solve any crisis. Accept the fact that there is absolutely no legitimate excuse for relapse, including friction with others, a horrible day, boredom, significant stress, holidays, alcohol use, an auto accident, financial crisis, the end of a relationship, job loss, a terrorist attack, a hurricane, an earthquake, the birth of a baby, or the eventual inevitable death of those we love most. Try and visualize yourself not smoking or using oral nicotine products through each and every step needed to overcome the most difficult challenge your mind can possibly imagine. Yes you can!
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Russellina
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:01

11 Mar 2008, 21:04 #14

This reminds me of the many times I had tried to quit in the past. I would start a quit, my husband would make me angry and I would smoke at him. Get this - At the time, I figured my relapse was his responsibility. Now there is some insaine addict thinking for you.

That was 20 or so years ago. That husband is long gone. I really fixed him, didn't I.
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Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

31 Mar 2008, 05:26 #15

Thinking vs. Wanting - There is a major distinction between thinking about using nicotine, and wanting to smoke, chew, dip. It is easy to confuse the two. After years of smoking cigarettes, chewing tobacco or dipping snuff or snus, you should fully expect to notice nicotine addicts (especially in movies), and keenly sense the smell of smoke. But it does not necessarily mean that you want to smoke, dip or chew yourself. At this very moment you are reading and "thinking" about the topic, yet probably not "wanting" or craving nicotine. Thinking about recovery is good, not bad, as it helps avoid complacency. As for thoughts of wanting, with each passing day they will gradually grow shorter in duration, generally less intense and a bit further apart. Eventually they will grow so infrequent that when one does arrive it may bring a smile to your face, as it may be the only reminder of the amazing journey you once made.
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Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

10 Apr 2008, 09:10 #16

Study Nicotine Users Closely - They are not smoking, chewing or sucking nicotine to tease you. They do so because they must, in order to replenish a constantly falling blood-serum nicotine level that declines by half every two hours. Most nicotine is delivered into the bloodstream while on auto-pilot. What cue triggered the public feeding you are now witnessing? Watch acid-producing events such as stress or alcohol quickly neutralize their body?s nicotine reserves. As you watch the smoker in the car beside you, you are witness to an endless mandatory cycle of replenishment.
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Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

12 May 2008, 06:35 #17

Measuring Victory - Forget about quitting "forever." Like attempting the seemingly impossible task of eating an entire cow or steer, it is the biggest psychological bite imaginable. Instead, adopt a more manageable "one steak at a time," or better yet "one day at a time" recovery philosophy for measuring victory. If we insist on seeing success only in terms of quitting forever then on which day will we celebrate? Who is coming to that party? Why not celebrate every day of healing and freedom.
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Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

25 May 2008, 09:24 #18

It Is Never Too Late - Regardless of how long we have been hooked, how old we are, or how badly we have damaged our body, it is never too late to arrest our dependency, become its master, and commence the most intense period of healing our body has ever known. Delivering at least 1/3 more cancer causing chemicals than oral tobacco (43 vs. 28), and hundreds of toxic gases, there is no debate but that the cigarette is by far the dirtiest and most deadly nicotine delivery device of all. But the harms inflicted by even the cleanest nicotine delivery device should not be taken lightly. Not only does nicotine break down into one of the most potent cancer causing agents of all, NNK, it is a super toxin that, drop for drop, is more deadly than diamondback rattlesnake venom, arsenic, strychnine or cyanide. Just 2-3 drops of pure nicotine on the skin (40 to 60mg) is sufficient to kill a 160-pound human. The average smoker introduces 1mg of nicotine into the bloodstream with each cigarette, an amount sufficient to kill a one-pound rat. Is it any wonder that each nicotine fix eats away more of the brain's gray matter, or that nicotine is capable of damaging or destroying a developing fetus?
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Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

01 Jul 2008, 08:17 #19

Crave Episode Frequency - The "average" number of crave episodes (each less than three minutes) experienced by the "average" quitter on their most challenging day of recovery is six episodes on day three. That is a total of 18 minutes of challenge on your most challenging day. But what if you are not "average?" What if you established and must encounter twice as many nicotine-feeding cues as the "average" quitter? Can you handle up to 36 minutes of significant challenge during which the subconscious mind rings an emotional anxiety alarm, in order to reclaim your mind, health and life? Absolutely! We all can. Be prepared for a small spike in crave episodes on day seven, as you celebrate your first full week of freedom from nicotine. Yes, for most of us, nicotine use was part of every celebration. Also stay alert for subtle differences between crave-triggers. For example, the Sunday newspaper is much thicker and may have required three cigarettes to read instead of just one.
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Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

14 Jul 2008, 08:17 #20

Recovery Phases -
(1) Physical nicotine withdrawal peaks by day three and within two weeks the body physically adapts to functioning without it. Known as nicotine?s half-life, every two hours the amount remaining in the bloodstream is naturally reduced by half. All nicotine and 90% of the chemicals it breaks down into (metabolites) will have passed from the body within 72 hours of ending all use. During this period it is entirely normal to feel de-sensitized, as if part of you is being left behind. But your brain is working hard to restore natural neuro-chemical sensitivities. Be patient with your healing.
(2) You have trained your subconscious mind to expect the arrival of a new supply of nicotine upon encountering specific times, locations, activities, people or emotions. The process of reconditioning and breaking these subconscious triggers and cues also peaks during the first week, at about day three. All but remote, infrequent, holiday or seasonal nicotine use triggers are extinguished within a month.
(3) The final phase of recovery, thought fixation, is the least intense yet longest. Here the rational, thinking mind will find itself fixating on conscious thoughts about wanting to use nicotine. Although at times nearly impossible to see and appreciate, with each passing day thoughts of wanting gradually grow fewer, shorter in duration and generally less intense. Within a few months they will become the exception, not the rule, as you gradually start to develop an expectation of going entire days without once "thinking" about wanting for nicotine.
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