Nicodemon's Lies or Our Lies?

Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:02

29 Aug 2006, 16:23 #21

Great reading I still need this site to keep me constant!

I have been quit for 5 Months, 2 Weeks, 2 Days, 3 hours, 25 minutes and 16 seconds (169 days). I have saved £439.77 by not smoking 1,691 cigarettes. I have saved 5 Days, 20 hours and 55 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 13/03/2006 06:00
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

30 Aug 2006, 01:15 #22

Every day I find another thread here that reinforces my quit. I am still so new but I feel like I have learned so much allready. this thread is one of the best I have read yet . Awsome I think I am finally starting to " get a Clue"
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

17 Mar 2007, 20:52 #23

  1. It's my choice and I choose to smoke! - It's a lie and you know it! You lost all "choice" and the ability to simply walk away the day that nicotine feedings became mandatory. The only choice now is how EARLY you feed the beast within. The ignorant nicotine addict still believes the "choice" myth. It has been pounded into their brain by an endless stream of highly effective tobacco company marketing with all the pretty colored boxes, the displays and a sea of ads. How often have you seen any smoker switch brands? It's a well set trap for teens and a way to keep you from looking at the man behind the curtain - a chemical called nicotine. The uneducated smoker associates smoking with the newspaper, coffee, travel, stress, other smokers, telephone calls, meals, celebrations, romance, or even as a necessary step prior to walking into a store. The educated nicotine addict sees all nicotine fixes as either mandatory, or an early feeding, in order to avoid the onset and discomfort of chemical withdrawal. You smoke nicotine after a meal because it's time for a nicotine feeding and you smoke before a meal because it isn't polite to feed yourself nicotine and food at the same time.
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Joined: 04 Apr 2005, 07:00

17 Apr 2007, 22:04 #24

Beware the temptation to demonize tobacco, to give a personality or a purpose to your addiction - It has no agenda and can not think, "It has an IQ of zero." There is no one who lives inside of you trying to get you to smoke except you.

All of the ideas set forth in John Polito's essay lay bare the denial, the lies and the misconceptions we had and others have about why they smoke and why they can not quit. But it can be done. We have proven it. Education is the key, not creating a mythological demon that we must chastise to keep at bay or that we must slay. It is a physiological change that we must come to accept and with which we must learn to live.

On any given day, whether we are free for one day or 1000 days, we can create a craving from a thought. We only have to caress the thought and to nurture it. Often we wonder, "Why now?" and do not realize that we reacted to the thought in such a manner that encouraged it to persist and to grow. That is not the result of any demon living within us. It is an example of how much power we have over our own ability to heal or not.

Read my friends, and grow.

Joseph
2 years 6 months.
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

27 Jul 2007, 07:03 #25

  1. I'd quit but withdrawal never ends! - False! If you remain 100% nicotine free for just 72 hours, your blood will become nicotine free, your withdrawal anxieties will peak in intensity and the number of psychological craves will peak in number. The greatest challenge will be over. Within 10 days to two weeks, actual physical withdrawal is substantially complete as your mind has physically adjusted to the absence of nicotine and accustomed to natural brain dopamine levels. What then remains will be to encounter and recondition your remaining psychological habit crave triggers and to learn to live with the millions of smoking memories stored deep within your mind. You will experience your first day of total quit comfort, where you never once even "think" about a cigarette or smoking, by at least day ninety. The sad part is that you won't even realize that it has happened. After the first such day, they grow more and more frequent until they become your new norm. The deep sense of lasting comfort and calmness that awaits you is probably beyond your comprehension. The real "you" is in total control!
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

25 Oct 2007, 00:18 #26

4. It reduces my stress and helps calm me down - It's a lie.

15. It's my choice and I choose to smoke! - It's a lie and you know it!

28. I'll cut down or quit and smoke just one now and then

30. Ok, I'm going to quit! Now I can enjoy my smokes until then! - If you've done this more than once, isn't it just more junkie head games ?
Whatever the denial justification, blame transference, or self-deceit you can come up with it has been covered by all of us and then some. We're all addicts too. We've told ourselves these lies too. It's time to come clean. It's time to be honest with ourselves. It's time to take control ......by making and keeping a personal pledge to live in control and free by staing nicotine free - naturally - for the rest of today. NTAP.
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Joined: 04 Apr 2005, 07:00

05 Nov 2007, 09:17 #27

4. It reduces my stress and helps calm me down - It's a lie. When we experience stress it makes our urine become more acidic. As the stressed smoker's urine turns acidic it causes the nicotine in their blood to be metabolized and removed at an accelerated rate. The more stressed the smoker becomes the quicker their blood nicotine level drops. The stressed smoker's rapidly declining blood nicotine level causes them to begin experiencing the discomfort of early nicotine withdrawal. It is here that the stressed smoker says, "I NEED A CIGARETTE!" Within seconds after smoking, their blood nicotine level rises, the anxieties associated with early nicotine withdrawal subside, and the nicotine addict is left with the false impression that smoking helped reduce their stress and calm them down. All non-smokers experience stress in life. The difference is that non-smokers don't have early nicotine withdrawal amplifying their stress. Rising and falling nicotine levels keep all smokers on a life-long anxiety filled roller-coaster ride. In truth, stress nicotine depletion causes smokers to experience far more anxiety than non-smokers.

12. Dad just died, this isn't the time! - Smoking won't bring dad back nor cure any other ill in life. Success in quitting during a period of high stress in life insures that future high stress situations won't serve as your excuse or justification for relapse. If you think about it, if we continue to live we will all see someone we love die. Such is the cycle of life. It's extremely sad but serious illness, injury, or the death of a loved one are the most convincing justifications that quitters sell themselves on, in order to justify keeping their drug. There is no better time to quit than before your next mandatory feeding. Don't allow finances, work, illness, education or relationships to serve as your excuse to remain an active addict. There is no legitimate justification for ever putting nicotine back into our body - none, zero, never!
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

15 Nov 2007, 06:56 #28

But the craves last for hours! - Just like the lingering thought of a nice juicy steak, lobster in butter sauce, or fresh baked hot apple pie, you can make yourself "think" about having a cigarette all day long, if that's what you really want to do. Unlike thoughts, crave anxiety attacks last for less than 3 minutes. It's important that you look at a clock and time them as your mind can make those minutes seem like hours. The bulk of the anxiety surrounding each crave is self induced. Such "thoughts" can be controlled with honest answers and through the power of positive thinking. Strip away all the self-inflicted anxiety and what remains on Day 3 for the "average" quitter is just 18 minutes of true crave anxiety (an average of six craves each less than three minutes in duration).
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

26 Dec 2007, 07:32 #29

I can't quit alone. I'll need nicotine gum, the patch, hypnosis, acupuncture, magic herbs or other wonder drugs! - Wrong! The simple truth is that no magic cure has ever "made" any smoker quit smoking nicotine. The key to permanent abstinence is education and understanding not hypnosis, not acupuncture and not a 93% chance of relapsing with six months while using some over-the-counter nicotine product that teaches nothing while robbing you of a valuable opportunity to master the core principles underlying years of nicotine dependency. Remember, should all else fail, you always have you!
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

19 May 2008, 08:03 #30

I tried quitting but my family stopped supporting me or was giving me such a hard time that it caused me to throw in the towel - It's a lie. You gave up because you used your family as a cheap excuse to get your drug back. You exaggerated everything they did or didn't do. You're the drug addict yet you expect them to understand the weakness and thinking of a drug addict's mind. How could they know what it's like to go through chemical withdrawal themselves? Is it fair to expect them to appreciate the magnitude or duration of your challenge? They just want you to be normal and don't know how to react. Feeling unappreciated, picking fights and creating confrontation are tools of the addict's mind used to reclaim their drug. Some know that if they inflict tremendous stress on loved ones that they may even convince them to offer to buy their relapse cigarettes for them. That way they can blame their relapse on their loved one. "They just couldn't handle my quitting." "Maybe next time!"
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

06 Aug 2008, 07:58 #31

It's one of my few pleasures in life - Does that mean that it's better than the pleasure of having a throat to deliver fresh air and great food, two lungs with which to laugh, a healthy heart to feel love, or an undamaged mind which dreams of a wonderful tomorrow? Pleasure from your addiction or pleasure in committing slow suicide at the hands of a mind that thinks it can only live with the aid of a powerful stimulant? What do they call someone who derives pleasure from self-inflicted harm or who slowly puts themselves to death? Pick your own label! Which nicotine fix out of the last 5,000 was the one that brought you tremendous pleasure? Which cigarette out of the next 5,000 may be the one that sparks permanent damage or disease, or that carries death's eternal flame? If bad news arrives tomorrow will "pleasure" cross your mind? Your only pleasure is in postponing the challenge of the initial 72 hours that it takes to remove all nicotine from your blood.
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

08 Oct 2008, 05:59 #32

If I quit, I'll just start back again. I always do. - The truth is that you don't have to relapse. We relapse because we rewrite the law of addiction, we forget why we quit, or we invent lies and stupid excuses, such as those that fill this page. Your next quit can be your last but you need to learn how to care for your quit, while always applying the only rule that you'll ever need to obey - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF OF NICOTINE!
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

25 Oct 2008, 05:29 #33

Quitting causes weight gain and it's just as dangerous - Quitting doesn't increase our weight, eating does. As far as a few extra pounds being "dangerous," you'd have to gain over one hundred additional pounds in order to equal the health risks associated with smoking one pack a day. Keep in mind that your general health, physical abilities and lung capacity will all improve dramatically. If patient, you will have the physical and mental tools necessary to shed any extra pounds. Remember, smoking was your cue that a meal had ended. Unless you develop a new cue there may be fewer leftovers.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Nov 2008, 08:47 #34

I get bored. It helps pass the time - Tobacco does not control any clock on earth but it does control you. For the pack a day nicotine smoker it takes about 30 minutes before their blood's nicotine level to drop to the point where their mind sends them an "urge" of discomfort to remind you that it's time for a feeding. It doesn't matter where they are or what they're doing. Depending upon your daily nicotine requirements, the voice inside your head will let you know when it's time. All you're doing when bored is being alert enough to what lies ahead, so that you keep topping off your nicotine tank before the next message of discomfort arrives.
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

30 Dec 2008, 08:55 #35

I enjoy smoking - The difference between heroin and nicotine is that one chemical delivers a tremendous high while the other is far more addictive. Studies have long ranked nicotine as a more addictive substance than either heroin or cocaine. Cocaine's generally recognized addiction rate among regular users is 15% while nicotine's is over 70%. Imagine convincing your mind that it "likes" being addicted to the drug that most addiction scientists now rank as the most addictive substance on earth. We are nicotine addicts. A pack a day smoker smokes 7,300 cigarettes each and every year. How many of your last 7,300 smokes did you really enjoy? How many of the next 7,300 will bring joy to your life? Isn't the true joy of being a well fed nicotine addict in not having to feel the discomfort associated with withdrawal?
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

06 Jan 2009, 08:43 #36

I like to smoke when I drink and I find myself smoking even more - The effects of drinking and stress upon our body's nicotine level are the same. You smoke more when you drink not because you "like" to but because you MUST in order to keep your body's nicotine level within the comfort range, so that it does not experience the symptoms of early withdrawal. When you drink alcohol it causes your urine to become acidic. The acid causes nicotine to be drawn from your blood at an accelerated rate. Thus, the more you drink, the more nicotine you'll need to ingest to avoid the anxiety of early withdrawal. Although early alcohol use contributes to destroying a great many quit attempts, understanding the nicotine-acid relationship can be of benefit in accelerating physical nicotine withdrawal so that quitters can begin feeling relief sooner. Acidic fruit juices, such as cranberry, may help reduce the normal 72 hours of withdrawal required to remove all nicotine from the blood. If at all possible, don't drink during the first few days of your quit. When you do decide to drink, consider drinking at home without cigarettes around before testing your resolve around smokers. By doing so you'll help to break the your mind's psychological link between smoking and drinking, with as little risk as possible. As millions of ex-smokers can attest, your beer or drinks will taste better than ever once your taste buds are allowed an opportunity to heal.
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Joined: 06 Dec 2008, 16:58

19 Apr 2009, 15:29 #37

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Joined: 06 Dec 2008, 16:58

26 May 2009, 00:17 #38

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Joined: 14 Mar 2009, 17:00

31 May 2009, 22:46 #39

Near and Still Dear to my heart!

Katie - Free and Healing for Four Years, Seven Months, Fourteen Days, 12 Hours and 15 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 117 Days and 4 Hours, by avoiding the use of 33750 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $5,430.43.
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Joined: 11 Nov 2008, 19:22

12 Apr 2010, 22:58 #40

Boredom is a fascinating emotion, good not bad.  They say time flies when having fun but chemical servitude isn't voluntary and using time and life to damage and destroy life is a mental illness called drug addiction. 

If a pack-a-day smoker spent an average of 5 minutes for each nicotine fix (including buying, getting to your spot, getting your fix and clean-up), that's 100 minutes per day, 1 hour and 40 minutes that's now either empty or looking to be used.  And how was that time used?  It was the addict's replenishment period, when dopamine pathway wants were satisfied, a period of chemical stimulation.  

The beauty of boredom is that it's an invitation to find clean, healthy and natural ways to stimulate our body and mind.   It need not happen now but ending feelings of purposelessness brings purpose to life.   If a pack a day smoker, those 100 minutes are yours for the taking, a gift from you to you!   That's 36,500 minutes per year, 608 hours or fifteen 40-hour work weeks per year.  I don't know what you have in mind but that's a pretty massive gift you've given yourself!   Just one simple rule to keep those 15 extra activity weeks, no nicotine today!!!

Breathe deep, hug hard, live long,

John (Gold x10)     
Last edited by JohnPolito on 12 Apr 2010, 23:59, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 17 Aug 2010, 16:35

13 Sep 2010, 17:25 #41

Great thread and terrific opening post, John.

I've met the 'Nicodemon's' lies so often I've started to regard them as bogus spooks in a carnival Fun House. How frightening and powerful they all seemed the first time around. But how absurd and powerless they've come to seem in time.

I would add the Monster that was once the most frightening of all: the terrible Black Bird I used to fear would come and steal my quit at night. Yes, a part of me once saw failure as happening just that way: something coming from the sky, something too big and too powerful for me to fight against it. Of course, I feared the same Black Bird would swoop down from the heavens and put twenty pounds on my waist when I quit.

When we give time a little more time, though, we see: the whole battle is fought in the moment...and that, praise be, is the one thing over which we do have some control. If I watch my ounces, my pounds will take care of themselves. And if I stay positively on my toes throughout the day, my quit can whip any Black Bird.
Gratefully Gold

I escaped from the prison of smoking on August 14, 2010.  
[font]The best revenge is quitting well![/font] 
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Joined: 11 Nov 2008, 19:22

13 Sep 2010, 20:09 #42

Johnnie wrote:
Yes, a part of me once saw failure as happening just that way: something coming from the sky, something too big and too powerful for me to fight against it.  ...  When we give time a little more time, though, we see: the whole battle is fought in the moment...and that, praise be, is the one thing over which we do have some control.  
 That was a big fear of mine too, Johnnie, that all my time, energy and work would be taken from me by forces beyond my ability to control.  But you hit the answer on the head, that all I could control was the next couple of minutes and taking them just one at a time, each would always be do-able!   Well said!
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Joined: 04 Jan 2011, 23:56

05 Jan 2011, 20:56 #43

NICODeMON is me, only me, and therefore I have all the power I need. I have at one time or another used nearly every excuse here to continue feeding my addiction. The more I can relate to a common experience, the more confident and powerful I can be in healing. Thank you, thank you,  thank you!  Every word is a powerful tool.

5 days, 13 hours, 58 minutes
Not smoked 72 "cancer sticks"
Money which will be better spent - $17.20 (nearly half of what I need for Yoga classes)
Life saved - 6 hours
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