Never Take Another Puff

Never Take Another Puff

Joel
Joel

February 9th, 2002, 10:56 am #1

Joel's Reinforcement Library


"Never Take Another Puff!"



I said it every day of the clinics, it's in almost all my posts, and you see it at the end of each of these short articles. Even so, I still feel I cannot repeat it enough - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF! It is not that I am afraid that you will like the cigarette and decide how wonderful going back to smoking will be. To the contrary, it will probably make you dizzy, nauseous, and generally sick. You may absolutely hate yourself for having done it. Even this, though, is not the problem.

The real danger is the reinforcement of the nicotine addiction. It is a powerful addiction. One puff can send you back to your old level of cigarette consumption within days. We have had clinic participants who have previously quit smoking for periods exceeding 20 years. One day they decide to try just one. Even after this great period of time, the first cigarette is enough to start the whole addiction withdrawal process. They are again hooked on a drug, and within days the full habit returns. All of the physical dangers, psychological problems, and tremendous expenses return to their previous levels. If you do not believe this can happen to you, come into the first or second night of my next stop smoking clinic. Listen to all of the new enrollees who are there to quit smoking. These are people who were once off cigarettes for a substantial period of time before, people who liked not smoking, people who loved not smoking, people who now need help to once again reclaim their nonsmoking status because of one tragic mistake. They were not immune to the first drag. The odds are, neither are you. Consider this the next time you have a passing thought for a cigarette.

Now you have a choice. You can remain an ex-smoker or you can become an addicted smoker once again. Consider both options carefully. Which way of life better suits you - a slave to a deadly weed or a truly free person? The final decision is yours. If you choose the latter, simply practice the following advice - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!




Last edited by Joel on October 12th, 2012, 3:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

September 19th, 2002, 5:55 am #2

For the Dreaded Quitter. I saw where you wrote you were shocked to how a person could go back to their old level so quickly after relapsing. I just want to make sure that you recognize that this is the norm--the rule and not the exception. To avoid ever smoking the way you did in the past you must always remember the importance of knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

November 13th, 2002, 9:55 pm #3

This is the Canadian government's addiction warning label.
Can you read the fine print?
Even if only an hour or two, be proud of how far you've come!
Last edited by John (Gold) on July 3rd, 2009, 1:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

January 28th, 2004, 9:37 pm #4

I spent most of my time this morning kicking up posts for newer members. Our longer-term members also need to stay vigilant with their quits. This message applies to all people whether they are in their first day or their ten thousandth day. The only way to insure this quit will last is to get through today with your commitment intact to never take another puff! Joel

October 1, 2011:

Updating this thread to include the following video, "What is your quit smoking mantra." It talks about how while I use the phrase "Never Take Another Puff" in most of my articles and videos, I am not really wanting people to use the phrase only as a mantra to help sustaining a quit. The video explains the issue in a better way than I can explain it here:

Last edited by Joel on October 1st, 2011, 1:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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winna660
winna660

June 22nd, 2006, 9:53 pm #5

For today, for tomorrow, for next week, year, decade...FOREVER.....
Administration of a drug to an addict will cause reestablishment of chemical dependance upon the addictive substance. Administration of a drug to an addict in this case means taking a puff. It's crystal clear to me. I will NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!I have been quit for 1 Month, 1 Week, 1 hour, 22 minutes and 51 seconds (38 days). I have saved $93.89 by not smoking 570 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Day, 23 hours and 30 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 5/15/2006 7:30 AM
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Just Hannes
Just Hannes

April 6th, 2007, 10:24 am #6

The first time I notice an error in one of the thousands articles of Joel:

Joel states:
"One puff can send you back to your old level of cigarette consumption within days."

Should be:
"One puff will send you back to your old level of cigarette consumption within days."

One little very important word.

Frits (almost 4 months)
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Joel
Joel

April 6th, 2007, 11:07 am #7

Joel states:
"One puff can send you back to your old level of cigarette consumption within days."
Should be:
"One puff will send you back to your old level of cigarette consumption within days."
I used the word "can" as opposed to "will" very purposely.

The Lucky One's Get Hooked!



NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF! Even though this sentence consists of four simple words, some ex-smokers have a hard time understanding the true meaning of this most important concept. These are the unfortunate smokers who make the tragic experiment of trying a cigarette to see how they will react. There are two possible outcomes to taking a puff. First, and most likely, the ex-smoker will become hooked and return to his old level of consumption, usually within a matter of days. The other possible reaction is that he does not get hooked. In the long run, he will truly be the greatest loser.

The ex-smoker who gets hooked from the first puff will have learned a valuable lesson. If he ever quits again, he will have a good chance of long term success, for he knows from his own experience that he cannot ever take one puff without going right back to his old level. He knows that he is not depriving himself of one drag, but rather doing himself a great favor by not smoking the amount that he used to when addicted to nicotine.

On the other hand, the ex-smoker who takes a drag and doesn't get hooked gets a false sense of confidence. He thinks he can take one any time he wants and not get hooked. Usually, within a short period of time sneaking a drag here and there, he will become hooked. One day he too may try to quit and actually succeed. He may quit for a week, month, or even years. But always back in his mind he feels, "I know I can have one if I really want to. After all, I did it last time and didn't get hooked right away." One day, at a party or under stress or just out of boredom he will try one again. Maybe this time he will get hooked, maybe not. But you can be sure that there will be a next time. Eventually he will become hooked again.

This poor person will go through a life of perpetual relapses. On cigarettes and off, on and off. Each time he goes back, he will have to quit once again. And you know what that means - going through the two week withdrawal process over and over again. You hated going through it once. Think what it would be like to go through it three, four or even more times. One participant did it thirteen times, others eight and nine times each. If they had just become hooked the first time they took a puff, it might never have happened again.

Taking the first drag is a no win situation. There is little doubt that it will result in your returning to a powerful and deadly addiction. Consider the full ramifications of once again becoming addicted to cigarettes. The health consequences, the expense, the social stigma, the sense of failure and the prospects of once again having to go through the withdrawal process when you once again try to quit. Keep all this in mind and remember - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!
Last edited by Joel on October 27th, 2009, 11:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Just Hannes
Just Hannes

April 6th, 2007, 11:17 am #8

I am sorry,

You are right Joel...

"One puff can send you back to your old level of cigarette consumption within days."

This puff can send you back smoking or it can send you back to your 72 hours of withdrawal.

There are 2 options not one so the word 'will' should be 'can'......

Frits
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Joel
Joel

April 6th, 2007, 8:06 pm #9

"There are 2 options not one so the word 'will' should be 'can'......"
There are three possible outcomes:
1. The person takes a puff and quickly goes back to smoking
2. The person takes a puff and goes through a withdrawal cycle
3. The person takes a puff and nothing happens.
Again, as pointed out above, the third option is in many ways the most dangerous of the outcomes. It sets up a precedent of belief that may in fact result in the person going through lots of quits and lots of failures.
Last edited by Joel on October 27th, 2009, 11:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

April 18th, 2007, 9:16 am #10

Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on October 27th, 2009, 11:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Fritzzey
Fritzzey

July 29th, 2007, 9:18 am #11

I live everyday with NTAP resounding in my head. The third day of my quit, during one of many sleepless nights, I kept repeating those letters all night. Reminding myself... "DON'T DO IT!"
I started smoking after a 13 year quit just because I was not educated in the role addiction plays on your brain. The difference now is that I am informed and know full well I can never take another puff. The last time, I quit I found comfort in knowing I could easily take a puff if the withdrawals became too bad. Now, I know to take a single puff will be the beginning of the end. I never want to go through this again. I love not allowing cigarettes control of my life.

My mother has stopped smoking for 30 years and she claims that there are times when she too still battles withdrawals. She said once in a great while when she smells a cigarette she thinks how nice it would be to smoke ~ just one. She is wise enough to know that she can NTAP.

Free and lovin' it!
3w 2d 23:12 smoke-free, 239 cigs not smoked, $50.19 saved, 19:55 life saved

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Kris000
Kris000

July 29th, 2007, 11:49 pm #12

Never
Take
Another
Puff

Simple! Simple! Simple!
As long as you stay connected right here.

kris at 100 days
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

October 24th, 2007, 10:20 pm #13

You may be tired, you may be hungry, you may be happy, you may be ill, you may be sad, you may be angry. Live it all free by never taking another puff!

The key to remaining free and healing: Never Take Another Puff. Words to live by!

Sal
Goldx4
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RJW118
RJW118

October 24th, 2007, 10:33 pm #14

Amen to that,

I am quitting proof to the one puff can lead, will lead, may lead back to the previous level of consumption.

I am quitting proof of the the one puff file...

I lost a 2year 8 month pause in Oct 2003 thanks to lack of education, and one puff.

RJW...after 32yrs feeding, free at last 1 mo 7 day 2 hr 55 min 5 days life saved, 1485 not smoked, $334 saved

Never take another puff, not one puff ever......I'm thinking of getting it tattooed on my eye lids
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

April 29th, 2008, 4:15 am #15

"The real danger is the reinforcement of the nicotine addiction. It is a powerful addiction."
Excerpt from Joel's original letter above.
What if there was no nicotine in cigarettes? JoeJ Free - became an ex-smoker when I became clean of nicotine 3 years 3 months 18 days ago.
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on October 27th, 2009, 11:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: November 13th, 2008, 2:04 pm

October 12th, 2012, 3:19 pm #16

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Jennie
Jennie

February 13th, 2013, 9:08 pm #17

Joel wrote: 

There are three possible outcomes: 1. The person takes a puff and quickly goes back to smoking
2. The person takes a puff and goes through a withdrawal cycle
3. The person takes a puff and nothing happens.
Again, as pointed out above, the third option is in many ways the most dangerous of the outcomes. It sets up a precedent of belief that may in fact result in the person going through lots of quits and lots of failures.
I am glad you point this out. During my previous 17 year quit, there were two separate occasions when I smoked part of a cigarette and it was no big deal. I had no desire to smoke another one, so yes, I thought I could do that from time to time.Years later, the third time I puffed on a cigarette, I became addicted again for the next 17 years.

Anyone who said "One puff and you will be hooked again", wouldn't have credibility with me. (This does seem at odds with the Law of Addiction perhaps). I really wish someone had told me how risky it was to ever take another puff even though I had done it before without getting hooked again.
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Joined: November 13th, 2008, 2:04 pm

February 13th, 2013, 10:36 pm #18

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