Johnnie
Johnnie

September 3rd, 2010, 4:38 pm #141

I too have read Deborah's story and haven't the words to respond. Sometimes we need reminding that the stakes are realer than they seem when we're undergoing the wretched little craves that try to wreck our quits.
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Joined: November 11th, 2008, 7:22 pm

June 26th, 2011, 2:46 am #142


Only 24 years-old, what was Quentin's final act before dying?
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Joined: November 11th, 2008, 7:22 pm

July 12th, 2011, 1:53 am #143

Helen Bradford --- 9:19pm Jul 11
My doctor sent me for a chest x-ray because she suspected lung cancer and it showed that I have a shadow on my left lung. I am now facing a three week wait to see an oncologist and get a scan. I really can't believe this is happening to me, I am so frightened right now. Here was me thinking that I had quit smoking in time. I guess there is no way of knowing what is going on inside your body, no way of knowing if you have left your quit too late until it is too late.

Helen's post on WhyQuit's FaceBook page today. 
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Joined: November 11th, 2008, 7:22 pm

December 23rd, 2011, 9:09 pm #144

News has arrived of Helen Bradford's passing

Read Helen's story
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Joined: November 11th, 2008, 7:22 pm

February 13th, 2012, 1:07 pm #145



http://www.whyquit.com/whyquit/BryanLeeCurtis.html

The above image will begin appearing as a cigarette pack
lung cancer warning in Australia.  Imagine smoking that
next cigarette while looking at Bryan.  Millions will do so.
It shows dependency's grip and depth.   Friend?????

Still, just one guiding principle ... no nicotine today! 
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Joined: November 11th, 2008, 7:22 pm

March 3rd, 2012, 12:52 am #146

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rushnthru
rushnthru

April 27th, 2013, 1:20 pm #147

My friend the Cigarette, wow that is spot on ... yuck! 
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engben
engben

November 8th, 2013, 5:12 pm #148

This is the first time seeing this post....jaw dropping and sad! What was I thinking for so long. I can only imagine what my lungs look like. I recall seeing a artist rendition of what the outside of a smokers body might look like. In reality I wish it did do that. Maybe then I would have quite much sooner. Seeing is believing. What a fool I was!

Ben
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Joined: November 13th, 2008, 2:04 pm

November 8th, 2013, 8:26 pm #149

Glad you like this one Ben. It has always been my personal favorite article of the library for I feel that it had by itself influenced more individuals than any of the written articles I had used prior to joining the Internet. I specifically discuss this in the video WhyQuit.com reinforcement materials
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engben
engben

November 8th, 2013, 9:47 pm #150

Joel,

This site is serious business. Some of the stories on this post are difficult to read. I think I'm as healthy as a horse. I never knew that years after quitting you're still in a "risk zone" of getting cancer. Education is king, ignorance is bliss, and sometimes the truth just scares me. Cigarettes are my friend....what irony!
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Joined: November 13th, 2008, 2:04 pm

November 8th, 2013, 10:17 pm #151

"[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]I never knew that years after quitting you're still in a "risk zone" of getting cancer. "[/font]

I wrote the following response to a member who a couple of years after quitting was diagnosed with cancer:


[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Your story shows illustrates the importance of never writing off post quitting symptoms to simply having quit smoking. So many people put off going to doctors when they encounter any physical reactions after quitting thinking it has to be from some sort of quitting withdrawal when in fact, after the first few days, withdrawals play little to no role in problems they encounter over the months and years of the rest of their lives.[/font][font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]
[/font]

[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Following are some related articles and videos on the topic:[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]
[/font]

[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Life goes on without smoking[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]"If they ever cure lung cancer, I would go back to smoking."[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]What a relief, I think I have cancer![/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Post-operative complications and slower healing[/font]

[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]
[/font]

[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]I too wish I could say that you no longer have to worry about getting lung cancer after quitting, but the truth is the risk is there. Your chances reduce over time, and continuing to smoke increases the possibility a lot. We have lost a few members over the years here at Freedom to lung cancer after they had quit. Last year I shot a video about this possibility--with one of the points I really wanted to hit was in the event that cancer were ever found, having quit can still have a great advantage in still helping to save the person's life. The portion of the following video talking about Charlotte explores this issue.[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]
[/font]

[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Video: Finding out you have lung cancer after you quit smoking[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]
[/font]

[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF][font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Article talking about the importance of not smoking even in the event of a lung cancer diagnosis[/font]




Lung cancer patients who quit smoking double their survival chances 




Research: Influence of smoking cessation after diagnosis of early stage lung cancer on prognosis: systematic review of observational studies with meta-analysis 




Editorial: Smoking cessation 




People diagnosed with early stage lung cancer can double their chances of survival over five years if they stop smoking compared with those who continue to smoke, finds a study published on bmj.com today. 




This is the first review of studies to measure the effects of continued smoking after diagnosis of lung cancer and suggests that it may be worthwhile to offer smoking cessation treatment to patients with early stage lung cancer. 




Worldwide, lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer. In the UK, it is second only to breast cancer, accounting for around 39,000 new cancer diagnoses annually. 




Smoking increases the risk of developing a primary lung cancer; lifelong smokers have a 20-fold increased risk compared with non-smokers. But it is not known whether quitting after a diagnosis of lung cancer has any benefit. 




So researchers at the University of Birmingham analysed the results of 10 studies that measured the effect of quitting smoking after diagnosis of lung cancer on prognosis. 




Differences in study design and quality were taken into account to minimise bias. 




They found that people who continued to smoke after a diagnosis of early stage lung cancer had a substantially higher risk of death and a greater risk of the tumour returning compared with those who stopped smoking at that time. Data suggested that most of the increased risk of death was due to cancer progression. 




Further analysis found a five year survival rate of 63-70% among quitters compared with 29-33% among those who continued to smoke. In other words, about twice as many quitters would survive for five years compared with continuing smokers. 




These findings support the theory that continued smoking affects the behaviour of a lung tumour, say the authors. They also provide a strong case for offering smoking cessation treatment to patients with early stage lung cancer. 




Further trials are needed to examine these questions, they conclude. 




An accompanying editorial says this study adds more to the evidence that it is never too late for people to stop, even when they have lung cancer. 




Contact: 

Amanda Parsons, Research Fellow, UK Centre for Tobacco Control Studies, Primary Care Clinical Sciences, University of Birmingham, UK 

Tel: +44 (0)121 414 8611; Mobile: +44 (0)7889 975 859 

Email: a.c.parsons@bham.ac.uk




http://www.bmj.com/conten...ue7739/press_release.dtl







Influence of smoking cessation after diagnosis of early stage lung cancer on prognosis: systematic review of observational studies with meta-analysis

BMJ 2010;340:b5569

Published 21 January 2010

A Parsonsresearch fellowA Daleysenior lecturer, NIHR career scientistR Beghresearch associateP Aveyardclinical reader, NIHR career scientist 

Abstract


Objective To systematically review the evidence that smoking cessation after diagnosis of a primary lung tumour affects prognosis.

Design Systematic review with meta-analysis.

Data sources CINAHL (from 1981), Embase (from 1980), Medline (from 1966), Web of Science (from 1966), CENTRAL (from 1977) to December 2008, and reference lists of included studies.

Study selection Randomised controlled trials or observational longitudinal studies that measured the effect of quitting smoking after diagnosis of lung cancer on prognostic outcomes, regardless of stage at presentation or tumour histology, were included.

Data extraction Two researchers independently identified studies for inclusion and extracted data. Estimates were combined by using a random effects model, and the I2 statistic was used to examine heterogeneity. Life tables were used to model five year survival for early stage non-small cell lung cancer and limited stage small cell lung cancer, using death rates for continuing smokers and quitters obtained from this review.

Results In 9/10 included studies, most patients studied were diagnosed as having an early stage lung tumour. Continued smoking was associated with a significantly increased risk of all cause mortality (hazard ratio 2.94, 95% confidence interval 1.15 to 7.54) and recurrence (1.86, 1.01 to 3.41) in early stage non-small cell lung cancer and of all cause mortality (1.86, 1.33 to 2.59), development of a second primary tumour (4.31, 1.09 to 16.98), and recurrence (1.26, 1.06 to 1.50) in limited stage small cell lung cancer. No study contained data on the effect of quitting smoking on cancer specific mortality or on development of a second primary tumour in non-small cell lung cancer. Life table modelling on the basis of these data estimated 33% five year survival in 65 year old patients with early stage non-small cell lung cancer who continued to smoke compared with 70% in those who quit smoking. In limited stage small cell lung cancer, an estimated 29% of continuing smokers would survive for five years compared with 63% of quitters on the basis of the data from this review.

Conclusions This review provides preliminary evidence that smoking cessation after diagnosis of early stage lung cancer improves prognostic outcomes. From life table modelling, the estimated number of deaths prevented is larger than would be expected from reduction of cardiorespiratory deaths after smoking cessation, so most of the mortality gain is likely to be due to reduced cancer progression. These findings indicate that offering smoking cessation treatment to patients presenting with early stage lung cancer may be beneficial.

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/doi/10.1136/bmj.b5569

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/reprint/340/jan21_1/b5569 




Related BMJ Editorial:




Smoking cessation

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/doi/10.1136/bmj.b5630

http://www.bmj.com/cgi/co...xtract/340/jan21_1/b5630 

[/font]





Also related:


What is the use in quitting now?
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