My Cigarette, My Friend?

John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

30 Sep 2006, 16:40 #121

Smoking and structural brain deficits:
a volumetric MR investigation.

European Journal of Neuroscience, September 2006; Vol. 24(6): Pages 1744-1750

Gallinat J, Meisenzahl E, Jacobsen LK, Kalus P, Bierbrauer J, Kienast T, Witthaus H, Leopold K, Seifert F, Schubert F, Staedtgen M.

Clinic for Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Charite University Medicine, St Hedwig Krankenhaus, Turmstrasse 21, 10559 Berlin, Germany.

Growing evidence from animal studies indicates brain-damaging properties of nicotine exposure. Investigations in humans found a wide range of functional cerebral effects of nicotine and cigarette smoking, but studies focusing on brain damage are sparse. In 22 smokers and 23 never-smokers possible differences of the cerebral structures were investigated using magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based morphometry. Significantly smaller grey matter volume and lower grey matter density (P = 0.05, corrected) were observed in the frontal regions (anterior cingulate, prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex), the occipital lobe and the temporal lobe including parahippocampal gyrus, in smokers than in never-smokers. Group differences of either grey matter volume or grey matter density were also found in the thalamus, cerebellum and substantia nigra, among other regions. Smokers did not show greater volumes than never-smokers in any cerebral region. Magnitude of lifetime exposure to tobacco smoke (pack-years) was inversely correlated with volume of frontal and temporal lobes and cerebellum (P = 0.001, uncorrected). The data indicate structural deficits of several cortical and subcortical regions in smokers relative to never-smokers. The topographic profile of the group differences show some similarities to brain networks known to mediate drug reinforcement, attention and working memory processing. The present findings may explain in part the frequently reported cognitive dysfunctions in chronic cigarette consumers.
PMID: 17004938 [PubMed - in process]
Reply


John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Oct 2006, 10:37 #123

Last edited by John (Gold) on 11 Feb 2009, 21:44, edited 1 time in total.
Reply

John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Jan 2007, 11:19 #124

My Dip, My Friend?
Image
Gruen's Story
Reply

Gump19690
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

21 Feb 2007, 09:09 #125

Review Barbs story....she would have wanted you to.

I;ve been here a while and tonight was the first time I saw this video!

I Plan to use this video in talking to my kids about peer pressure and smoking.
Reply

John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Mar 2007, 10:16 #126

Image


Los Angeles Times - March 26, 2001
Scientists are trying to pinpoint why women seem to be more likely than men to contract lung cancer.

There won't be a dry eye in the house if Michele Reed gets to walk down the aisle in April and promise to love her new husband "till death do us part." Less than a year ago, doctors told the 28-year-old Albuquerque secretary she had terminal lung cancer. She may not survive long enough for her wedding.

A light smoker, Reed never imagined that, at her age, backaches and neck pains could be the first signs of lung cancer. Neither did her doctors. By the time they ruled out stress, allergies and asthma, a tumor in her lung had grown to 4 inches wide and the cancer had spread to her bones.

A gene that is more active in women than in men may explain why women smokers are more than twice as likely to develop lung cancer as men smokers, researchers say.

Sex-Specific Expression of Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor: Relationship to Smoking History and Risk of Lung Cancer,
Journal of the National Cancer Institute - January 5, 2000, Voll. 92, No. 1, 24-33
[/size]
Last edited by John (Gold) on 07 Jul 2009, 16:48, edited 2 times in total.
Reply

John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Mar 2007, 02:44 #127




Image

Reply

John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

02 Jan 2008, 21:35 #128

Image
Last edited by John (Gold) on 11 Feb 2009, 21:31, edited 1 time in total.
Reply

John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Jan 2008, 08:00 #129



My sister and I quit smoking in March (my sister) and April (me) of 2006. We quit a 40 year 2 pack a day habit cold turkey and we both rejoiced in the freedom, but it was too late for my sister. At the relatively young age of 58, she passed away on August 11, 2007 from interstitial lung disease complicated by COPD and high blood pressure. All of these diseases are smoke related. Cigarettes killed her as surely as if a gun was put to her head. Here is the story I wrote for her after she was gone.
For My Sister Rosa Willis
November 27, 1948 August 11, 2007
Me and my sister: We were inseparable. We spoke to each other every day of our lives, she was my best friend, and we were always together in every thing we did in our life. She was 4 years my senior, but from the time I was old enough to follow, I was right there where ever she was and she always waited for me, because I was her "baby sister" her ONLY sister, and she never wanted to leave me behind and she never did. Every stage in our life, falling in love, dating, marriage, the birth of our children, the death of our parents, any event, large or small, sad or happy, we shared; But there is one thing that I fervently wished that we had never shared...our first cigarette. And we continued to share those cigarettes for 40 years.

My wonderful sister recently passed away at the comparatively young age of 58 and cigarettes killed her as surely as if a gun was put to her head and someone pulled the trigger. Her death certificate states that tobacco use was a major contributor to her death, along with pneumonia, pulmonary fibrosis, COPD and hypertension (all of these conditions can be linked to tobacco use).

"She was taken from me like a thief came in the night and stole her away...." (Loretta Lynn's father said this to her when she married at the age of 13. Quoted from the movie "Coal Miner's Daughter")

A year and a half ago, my sister was diagnosed with pulmonary fibrosis and COPD. At first, the doctors thought she had lung cancer, and she was told to quit smoking or she would be dead in 2 or 3 months. At first, she STILL continued smoking, but on my mother's birthday, she gained the courage and the strength to slay the addiction and lay her cigarettes down and she never looked back. She had the courage and the motivation and the desire to change her life and she did. One month later, because of her, I was able to do the same thing. My husband and I decided to live and laid the cigarettes down and kicked them out of our lives for good.

My sister's convictions and her courage inspired me. In spite of her declining health, and her growing knowledge that she was seriously ill and might not be around much longer, she continued to enjoy her life and her freedom from addiction and continued to try and be an inspiration to others and show them that life without the demon on your back is possible and is wonderful. Quitting such a horrible addiction is empowering and she tried to show that to everyone she came in contact with. She was a wonderful person and a writer of such excellence, that I am almost ashamed to be trying to write about her. Nothing I could say could sum up such a wonderful person. Her perseverance and determination, her beautiful poetry and her compassionate spirit will live on after her and I hope that our story will continue to help others and let them see that you can be free.



I love you Rosa and I miss you....see you on the other side

Your one and only Marcy
Reply

John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Mar 2008, 07:22 #130

  1. Tribute to Susan (Suzie) DeWitt, Age 43
    A Son's Tribute - My Mom
    The DeWittFamily - Part 1

    The DeWitt Family - Part 2

    The DeWitt Family - Part 3
Last edited by John (Gold) on 11 Feb 2009, 20:18, edited 1 time in total.
Reply