Minimizing the Weight Gained

Physical healing of the body and mind
Glynda (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

06 Oct 2001, 03:40 #11

Image Hi John!

So, quitting a 1 pack a day habit adds 200 cal/day to the metabolism? I can burn approx. 100 calories per mile walked, so I would need to start walking a little over 2 miles everyday, and not eat additional food....just to break even! No wonder I gained weight! Let me do the math for my case (roughly):

250 cal/day (just from quitting smoking) + 350 cal/day (from extra eating instead of smoking) =
600 cal/day added x 53 days since I quit =
31,800 add'l calories divided by 3,500 cal/lb =
9 additional pounds....I've actually gained 10 in almost 8 weeks

Glad I started exercising everyday! I'm determined to stop and reverse this trend because I've got lots of nice clothes in my closet and I'm TOO CHEAP and TOO LAZY to buy a new wardrobe. This problem is actually a blessing in disguise because it's forcing me to get even HEALTHIER by exercising everyday and eatting better. I WON'T GIVE UP MY QUIT FOR ANYTHING! Talk about a lifestyle change! And it all started with quitting smoking :)

Thanks for the insight John :) YQS, Glynda Image
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Nov 2001, 21:16 #12

I thought the parade yesterday pointed some important issues out. First and foremost, the weight gain health issues are nothing compared to the health benefits derived from not smoking. But as this article talks about esthetics are a big issue for some people and as can be seen in the parade, there were some people who in fact kept their weight the same and some who have actually lost weight. It shows that gaining weight is not an inescapable end result of quitting.

If weight management practices are started at the beginning of a quit, weight gain can be kept minimal to nothing, and if weight gain has already occurred, it can be reversed if the issue has become important enough to any specific individual. You all have quit smoking--that proves to you that if you make up your mind and want to make a change badly enough you can do it. If you did it with smoking you can do it with weight too.

Although it may even be harder--it is still possible. The reason it "may" be harder is it really is a trickier issue. The reason it may be harder is it is often more difficult to know when you are overeating or under-exercising to balance the caloric intake of what you do eat. Eating is something you have to do for the rest of your life to maintain health and it is a matter of being vigilant to keep the average amounts in sync with your ever-changing activity levels. This can take some complicated thought for some people just are not able to gauge the right amount of food by hunger or need.

The smell or sight of food can create an intense desire whether a person is hungry or not, and then the thought of is this al little more food than I actually need is one that can be easily negotiated.

But quitting smoking or should I say staying off smoking is easier in the long run for the battle line is very clear. Smoking is an all or nothing proposition so the only calculation or negotiation one must do is considering going back to full-fledged smoking with all its problems and implications or smoking nothing. This in fact is a much clearer issue to happily say "NO" to. You don't need to do charts or keep tract of how much or of how little you are doing anything to stay off smoking now--all you have to do is simply remember to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Nov 2001, 23:59 #13

Image I saw where weight was brought up by one of our newer members. Even if one had not brought it up though, this is a time of year where we all need to be cognizant of the fact that we may eat more than normal with the holidays--a time of year that possibly even posed a problem while you were smoking. So the temptation to eat may not just be a quitting issue, it may be a time of year issue to.

Try to take precautions of planning proper eating patterns now, and also be careful not to write off all excessive eating events on only smoking cessation now. Watch the non-smokers and smokers around you and you will probably see both groups overall eating more than usual. The one difference you may observe is how the smokers just leave the table earlier or sit at the table a tad fidgity because they are trying to hold off going for their next fix.

They are in withdrawal--you are not. They have to leave the table earlier--you don't. You have a choice--you can leave with them and not smoke, or stay at the table and visit comfortably with the non-smokers. Either is doable and likely will be more comfortable than you imagine. But the smokers are not going to have such as easy time comfortably blending into the non-smoking group.

Again you have a choice and will continue to have the choice for the rest of your life. You can either relapse and be stuck having to maintain constant nicotine levels for the rest of your life, constantly relapse and start over and over again the rest of your life, or you can choose now to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

29 Nov 2001, 19:27 #14

Image For Mandy. The sooner in a quit an effort is made to avoid lifestyle changes that can cause significant weight gains, the less ingrained the behaviors will become and the easier it will be to keep your weight constant even as an ex-smoker.

People don't gain weight from quitting smoking, they gain weight from eating more after they quit smoking, or, as in Linda's case as can be seen in her earlier post today, from medical conditions that can sometimes be responsible for weight gain. If a person swears that they are eating no more and gain excesses of ten pounds or more, they should get checked out to see if there is some underlying cause for a weight gain. The effect should not just be written off to quitting smoking. But most people will not have these reactions if they just implement some sensible eating and exercise patterns while quitting. Barring medical complications that most people will not experience, weight control is fully possible for people if they take early precautions and keep in practice a healthy and normal eating and exercise pattern even though they stick to their commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply

GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

30 Nov 2001, 02:42 #15

the above posts from John and Joel, are absolutely on target. My doctors have all said the same thing. forget the word "diet" it only creates stress which leads to more eating and concentrate on behavior modifications which means changing your entire eating habits. Eat small and frequent meals, never reach for seconds, do not eat standing up or anywhere except a designated eating area and increase excercise to 40-45 minutes of walking, swimming, or any low impact aerobices, 4 times a week. If you desire a piece of chocolate or are out in a restaurant and creme brulee is on the menu....go for it. But make this the exception and not the rule. Oh, and don't forget the wine and other forms of alcohol. Lots and lots of calories there, too.
Joel's letting me stand behind "other" medical problems as an excuse for weight gain and yes, the fluid retention is a large part of it...but he know's first hand just how much I enjoy not only my food, but cooking.....and basically, since I've quit and battled other health problems and medications, nothing has impaired my appetite. I've eaten more and exercised less, and when you get down to it....that's why I've gained most of my weight.

but all in all.....this quit has been a miracle and and no matter what, nothing will ever take it away from me....if I remember to never take another puff. and by golly, that one phrase is etched in my mind like nothing else.
Image
Linda
one year and 11 months free
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Mar 2002, 00:47 #16

One thing I want to point out to our newest members--those off two weeks or less. There is a water retention (bloating) effect that often accompanies initial cessation. The scale is not an accurate indicator of fat changes in this time period--just weight fluctuations often accompanying water retention. Those initial gains will come down if water is the cause, usually by the third week.
Reply

Ladybird is Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

07 Mar 2002, 04:28 #17

This water retention information makes sense to me Image! Thanks! I gained about 3 pounds in the first 2 weeks of my quit, but now (3 weeks & 3 days into my quit! Image)I am at my original weight with only some extra exercise & a few extra calories along the way.
Susan
Reply

blondie (green )
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 20:19

23 May 2002, 04:37 #18

Hi,
I'm on day 12 nicotene-free now I think. It seems like overnight last week I weighed 4 - 5 pounds more than the day before. Could this be the water retention you speak about?

Of course, I'm concerned about weight gain, but first I'm trying to focus on my quit.

Is this water retention because I'm drinking so much water or an effect of withdrawal? Will the bloating ease off some pretty soon?

I am a lot more hungry than I used to be and am trying to follow your recommendations about eating and now that it's almost summer certainly I can get out and exercise more.

It does seem like I'm ALWAYS hungry and was never this way before. I hope this will level off.

Ruth
12 days now
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 May 2002, 05:27 #19

Yes Ruth, this is very likely a water retention effect. It can last well into the second week. It should adjust in the next few days if it is truly just water.

Joel
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 May 2002, 06:57 #20

I saw some newer member touting the benefits of candy to quit. What will make a quit successful is not what you stick in your mouth--it is what you don't stick in your mouth. To stay nicotine free is a matter of knowing not to stick a cigarette in your mouth and more specifically knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply