Medication adjustments

Physical healing of the body and mind

Medication adjustments

Joel
Joel

February 13th, 2002, 9:04 am #1

Often when people quit smoking they may find that medications that were adjusted for them while smoking may be altered in effectiveness once quitting. People on hypertensives, thyroid, depression, blood sugar drugs, and others may need to get re-evaluated for proper dosages once quitting.

The first few days quitting can be very difficult to determine, what is a "normal" withdrawal and what is a medication dosage issue. But once through the first few days, if a person who is on medications for medical disorders finds him or herself having physical symptoms that just seem out of the ordinary, he or she should speak to the doctor who has him or her on the medications. Point out to the doctor that you have recently quit smoking and started to notice the specific symptoms just after quitting and that they haven't improved over time. The doctor should know the medication and potential interaction that not smoking may be adjusting for and which way the dosing may need to altered.

Treating many conditions is a partnership between you and your physician. The doctor needs your input to effectiveness of any treatment, whether it be by physical measurements or by verbally communicating how you feel while under treatment. The treatment for one condition though is your primary responsibility. The condition--nicotine addiction. It is by no means a minor medical issue, it is in fact probably the greatest controlable health threat anyone will ever face. Afterall, what other lifestyle issues carry a 50% premature mortality rate? Not to mention all the other crippling side effects that go along with long-term smoking. The treatment for this condition is your primary responsibility. To effectively treat smoking for the rest of your life simply remember to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

CTinoco
CTinoco

August 17th, 2002, 4:33 pm #2

I AM VERY GRATEFUL FOR FREEDOM.....I HAVE BEEN WITHOUT A COMPUTER FOR DAYS....AND I MISSED READING AND POSTING, BUT THANK YOU GOD AND FREEDOM I AM NICOTINE FREE FOR 6 MONTHS 1WEEK AND 3 DAYS...JOEL...THANK YOU FOR THE INFORMATION YOU GIVE US .....
HUGS TO ALL,
CLAUDIA
Quote
Share

kiki
kiki

January 22nd, 2003, 11:58 pm #3

Thank you Joel- and the others new friends who have replied - to guide me on the right path. I just called my doctor and explained the situation and now will call my stomach doctor- who originally perscribed the medication for my reflux.Will also call my dentist for th throbbing gums. You guys are alright! Helping others to overcome this deadly habit of smoking.
Thank you
kiki
Quote
Share

Red Orris
Red Orris

May 14th, 2003, 9:02 pm #4

This is very important, I am on medications,
although it doesn't seem like there is a need
for adjusting my meds, it is so important
regardless, i believe to notify your doctor
about quitting smoking.

Thanks for re-posting this!

Sincerely
Red-Orris
Quote
Share

Red Orris
Red Orris

June 16th, 2003, 11:03 pm #5

Well, now just over a month later.

Infact my medications did need adjusting!

Just wanted to update!

Sincerely
Red-Orris
1month (s) 2week(s) 6 day(s) 11:35 hour (s) smoke-free,
1,256 cigarettes not smoked, $401.92 saved,
4day (s) 8:40 life saved
Quote
Share

BubblyDoodlebug Gold
BubblyDoodlebug Gold

June 17th, 2003, 1:59 am #6

I have had to have my meds adjusted. I found out it is very important to let your doctor know if you are being treated for not only Diabetes but other things as well that you are planning on quitting smoking that way when things do go awry the doctor will have a heads up on the situation. Don't wait to pass out on the toilet to get help either. Katherine
Quote
Share

ChangingDeidre
ChangingDeidre

July 10th, 2003, 12:51 pm #7

Your words are something I already know, but I still needed to be told.
Quote
Share

Coolmare2green
Coolmare2green

October 16th, 2003, 7:26 am #8

Hi Joel (or whomever else may have this info )---i have been reading up on withdrawal symptoms, and the possibility that the newly nic-free individual may need medication adjustments. thyroid was mentioned, and i'm assuming that would be hormone replacement therapy. i have been on thyroid hormone for years, and seem to suffer some pretty late onset symptoms. don't worry, i'm not asking for med advice-----i would just like to be pointed to the source of this info, so that when i see my endocrinologist next week, i'll be well informed-----especially in case he isn't.
Thanks
Mary
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

October 16th, 2003, 8:13 am #9

Has Your Thyroid Been Checked?
Quote
Share

Coolmare2green
Coolmare2green

October 16th, 2003, 8:55 am #10

Thanks Joel--- will let you know the outcome.
Mary
Quote
Share

cherylmcc
cherylmcc

September 1st, 2004, 3:28 am #11

For Robs all puffed out.

Hope this helps, it helped me.

Cheryl - Free and Healing for Two Months, Thirty Days, 15 Hours and 57 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 6 Days and 8 Hours, by avoiding the use of 1833 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $414.05.
Quote
Share

Kristen Goldx3
Kristen Goldx3

January 10th, 2006, 10:09 pm #12

This thread is important for anyone who is on a maintenance drug for long-term medical conditions. Please see your doctor if you have any issues or questions about your condition and if perhaps you might require a dosage adjustment based upon any symptoms you might have.

Kristen
Quote
Share

Mike851
Mike851

April 11th, 2006, 11:26 pm #13

Just as a sidenote...............As much improved as I have felt after quitting on 13th Feb, I decided to go to the Doctor's to get checked out..........He took my blood pressure and found it was high so I'm going back for a FULL medical after Easter including lung xray as I told him about my quit.

I'm a bit nervous about this, but I'm not going to bury my head in the sand and heaven knows what my blood pressure was like when I was smoking!!!


Mike W....No nicotine since 13th Feb
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

December 8th, 2006, 3:36 am #14

Treating many conditions is a partnership between you and your physician. The doctor needs your input to effectiveness of any treatment, whether it be by physical measurements or by verbally communicating how you feel while under treatment. The treatment for one condition though is your primary responsibility. The condition--nicotine addiction. It is by no means a minor medical issue, it is in fact probably the greatest controlable health threat anyone will ever face. Afterall, what other lifestyle issues carry a 50% premature mortality rate? Not to mention all the other crippling side effects that go along with long-term smoking. The treatment for this condition is your primary responsibility. To effectively treat smoking for the rest of your life simply remember to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

April 13th, 2007, 7:40 pm #15

From above:

The treatment for one condition though is your primary responsibility. The condition--nicotine addiction. It is by no means a minor medical issue, it is in fact probably the greatest controlable health threat anyone will ever face. Afterall, what other lifestyle issues carry a 50% premature mortality rate? Not to mention all the other crippling side effects that go along with long-term smoking. The treatment for this condition is your primary responsibility. To effectively treat smoking for the rest of your life simply remember to never take another puff!
Joel
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

August 12th, 2008, 5:59 am #16

Zero Medical Advice Policy :


Zero Medical Advice Policy This site is not meant to replace the advice of any physician. Do not rely upon any information that you read here at Freedom (or that you obtain through posts, email or links) to replace consultations or advice received by qualified health professionals regarding your own specific situation. The information provided here at Freedom is intended as nicotine cessation educational material only and it should NEVER be construed as medical advice.

If you have any question in your mind regarding any lingering health concern, including depression or mental health, IMMEDIATELY seek medical assistance. If you are not satisfied with the advice being rendered by a physician, you always have the right to obtain another medical opinion. We are not physicians or doctors here at Freedom. We are students and teachers of nicotine cessation.

It is also important for you to understand that as a nicotine cessation forum Freedom is staffed entirely by cessation educators who are not physicians, pharmacists or dietitians. Further, Freedom's Rules prohibit any member from rendering any medical advice to other members, from giving medication or herbal advice or recommendations, or from giving dieting or exercise advice or recommendations, other than the advice to seek the assistance of trained and qualified health care professionals.

There are organizations and individuals whose sites have disclaimers such as this to simply protect themselves legally. We have this policy because we believe it is right for every individual reading here. We do all we can to make sure that any information or concepts acquired here do not pose medical risks to readers.

When it comes to the treatment or management of any medical condition we sincerely believe that it is best for every person to deal with a qualified medical professional in their real world. The materials, concepts and information shared here allow readers to improve their health, and likely extend the productive years of their lives, by simply making and sticking to a personal commitment to Never Take Another Puff, Dip or Chew.

Links Disclaimer
Freedom posts may occasionally provide manager approved links to other Internet sites but Freedom's managers are not responsible for the availability or content of any other site, nor do we warrant or guarantee the accuracy of the information at any other Internet site, including sites maintained by managers or members in other capacities.
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on March 12th, 2009, 11:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: November 13th, 2008, 2:04 pm

March 12th, 2009, 9:58 pm #17

From above:

I saw a post up earlier asking when a person returns to "normal" after quitting. This string addresses the issue of what is "normal." "Normal" levels for certain people of certain neurotransmitters or hormones or other chemicals may not be what is normal or the right amount of these substances. That is why symptoms lasting longer than a few days should never be simply ignored or written off to longer term withdrawal. Prolonged symptoms should be medically evaluated to insure that the individual is indeed normal for various conditions.
Quote
Like
Share