Maybe this isn't the best time to quit?

Maybe this isn't the best time to quit?

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Sep 2001, 23:38 #1

I just hung up with a smoking clinic graduate of mine who was telling me that she had two friends signed up for the clinic I was supposed to start on Tuesday but that had gotten postponed because of the events that day. She had noted that they both seemed relieved that they didn't have to quit now until October. There were over 40 people registered for this clinic and I suspect many of the people felt the same way.

It reminded me of a clinic I did for a major insurance company about 18 years ago. The company had 6,000 employees in one site and offered an onsite smoking cessation clinic just after work hours. The employees had to pay $25 which the company would reimburse if they successfully graduated the clinic, come on their own time, and were still responsible for their normal daily work.

The company was expecting 20 to 30 employees to show, because they had done a pre-clinic interest survey. But only 6 people showed up. Most had chickened out at the last minute. But even the six who showed up were happy when they realized that with only six people the company would never pay for a whole clinic. But much to their surprise, management said that they were going on with the program anyway. You should have seen it--the six people who paid $25 and came on their own time--were all their trying to talk management into postponing the clinic. They thought they had a reprieve and they didn't.

What is impressive about this story though is that 5 out of those 6 people quit smoking and one year later, four of them were still off cigarettes. Even though they though they had an out, they still ended up quitting and I will bet that a year later each and everyone of those who quit were thankful for the companies original decision and to themselves for taking advantage of it.

I would have conducted the clinic this week if the Civic Center where we were conducting the clinic had been opened that night. But as this was not the case we were forced to postpone. All involved understood and hopefully they will all come to the program in October. Maybe some of them even stuck to their original plans and have quit on their own. Actually I had one woman, who had smoked for over 60 years who had flown in from New Mexico for the clinic--who did quit 7:00 pm Tuesday night and is still doing fine. I am maintaining regular phone follow-up with her.

The point is, even under the worst of circumstances, life goes on and smoking cessation is fully possible under any conditions. To survive smoke free and to come through such times stronger than you ever thought possible--stay focused on the fact that you have the strength, desire and resolve to prove that you will never take another puff!

Joel
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notamoment (gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

16 Sep 2001, 11:49 #2

There is no good time to quit when you're an addict ... or maybe EVERY time is a good time to quit. Just depends on how you look at it. I do believe that people reach their own point where they're ready, where they want NOT to smoke more than they want TO smoke. When you reach that point, I don't think it matters even if the earth goes backwards in its orbit around the sun... when you reach that state of mind, nothing will stop your quit.

I have been sickened, saddened and horrified by the events of this week but I have not once seriously considered smoking again. I'm in Canada and when I found out that my husband had to leave by car yesterday to travel to Los Angeles for business, I had two separate quick thoughts about getting a pack and having a smoke. Those thoughts lasted a grand total of about a minute and half.... because I really don't want to smoke, I just pushed them aside. After watching pictures of so many people gasping for air in the smoke and dust filled atmosphere of lower Manhatten, I feel that smoking would be disrespectful to them as well as unhealthy for me.

Joel thanks for your posts, they always help me to keep my focus... through good times and bad.

Susan
55 days, 1104 cigarettes not smoked, saving $265.18. Life saved: 3 days, 20 hours, 0 minutes.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

16 Sep 2001, 23:48 #3

Tomorrow?
"Tomorrow" is today's excuse to keep using nicotine and avoid our fear of withdrawal. I rarely bought more than a one day supply of nicotine at a time, as "tomorrow" was my lifelong excuse to live in a state of perpetual relapse.
Baby steps - just one hour and crave at a time! You can quit for an hour, we all can! Let the hours build into a full day of glory! You deserve to live free, we all do! You're not fighting an entire carton, pack or even one who cigarette - just one little puff! You're not quitting smoking FOREVER, for a year, a month, a week or even until tomorrow - just for today! If you're not successful today then tomorrow isn't important. Focus on today! It's how we all did it!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long, YQB John
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

20 Sep 2001, 08:58 #4

I just brought up a post about a program I did today titled, Why I don't speak at more site." I thought this one added a little clarity to the same issue.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

30 Oct 2001, 20:19 #5

Last week I finished the clinic that was originally scheduled to begin September 11. Of the 41 people signed, 31 showed up that first night, which was October 9. Actually, 10 people not showing up was not bad, that would likely have happened even if we had started on the 11th as originally scheduled. Three came only to the introductory session and dropped out. Of the 28 who came to more than one session, 24 quit and graduated and were still off as of last week (16 days smoke free), one I am not sure of because I have not been able to reach her (not a good sign but still giving her the benefit of the doubt), and three are smoking. Many of them noted at graduation how relieved they were when they did not have to quit on September 11, how they did not think they were going to quit in October either, how initially they were not even sure they wanted to quit, and how thrilled they were to finally be nicotine free.

For all our new members, as well as our lurkers who may never become members but are quitting anyway, don't worry about concepts like "I don't know whether I can do this," or "I am not even sure I want to do this." Things just fall in place as you get nicotine out of your system and as you begin to understand just what smoking was doing to you and what quitting smoking can do for you. As long as you stay focused on what both ways of life really entail, being a smoker with all its inherent risks or staying an ex-smoker with all its benefits, your decision will always remain to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

22 Dec 2001, 07:51 #6

This was originally posted in response to September 11th events. Some people were likely feeling that with the state of affairs of the country, if not the world at that time, conditions made it a less than right time to quit. Well, some people feel this about less significant issues too, like quitting around the holidays. Anytime is a good time to quit. The fact is, there is just no good time to smoke when it really comes down to it. So whether conditions seem optimal to quitting or terrible in nature, know you can survive through anything smoke free as long as you remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 Dec 2001, 12:14 #7

In case anyone who was thinking about quitting at New Years is now getting cold feet, thinking this isn't the best time to quit--it is the best time--not because it is or is not a holiday--it is the best time because it is now. Now is always the best time to quit, no matter when now is. So forget the cold feet syndrome and go for the cold turkey. You can save your health and your life if you simply set your goal and keep in practice your continued resolve to never take another puff!

Joel
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Jan 2002, 11:51 #8

Image
Which puff on which cigarette contains the spark that gives birth to that first cancerous lung cell, that kills your heart, or that seriously strokes your brain? Which one?
Last edited by John (Gold) on 13 Sep 2010, 21:29, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 Jan 2002, 01:26 #9

I'm in-between phone calls. I had to run a breakdown for the city of who showed up yesterday. I had mentioned we had 41 pre-registered and 43 people show up. But when analyzing who was there, it turns out that 19 of the preregistered people didn't show up. We had a number of walkins though make up the difference. I figured just in case any of the people who didn't join and were thinking that somehow this wasn't a good time to quit happen to stop by Freedom it would be good to get this one up for them. Today is a great day to quit and a great day to stay off of nicotine. The way to accomplish both goals is by always remembering to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 Feb 2002, 07:31 #10

For an update. Twenty-two people showed up last night. There were a few more who had quit but weather conditions stopped them from traveling in. I think 24 people actually ended up joining, not sure of two others yet. I had mentioned I lost one of them earlier today; the lady who had relapsed after a three year quit and now has smoked over 30 years.

You would be amazed to see the people who don't join. I will get people in who are emphysema patients, cancer patients, people who have been ravaged my many diseases who still don't stop. One person in this group had a father who had Buergers Disease and eventually died very young from other smoking complications. I had one person who was a lung cancer patient who didn't quit. A couple in the group have a strong familial history of emphysema and other chronic obstructive lung diseases, and are starting to face similar consequences themselves. It is really amazing to see so much devastation at all one time all in one group, and yet, it is basically the normal experience in most clinics I see. Normal-but still amazing.

Never lose sight that this mission you have set out on to become smoke free is truly a fight for your life. I think people some times forget this. But forcing yourself to remember smoking for what it is will help insure that you stay on your set path to never take another puff!

Joel
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