Maybe this isn't the best time to quit?

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Aug 2006, 00:13 #41

From above:

This string was first written around the time of the September 2001 terrorism attack in the United States. The message of this string though is applicable for all times. We have a bunch of new quitters who may find themselves thinking that some external circumstance or event will make this particular timing of a quit not seem quite right. No problem a person quitting might encounter warrants or justifies administering nicotine.

The question that a person thinking that this may not be the best time to stay quit needs to as himself or herself is:

"Is this the right time to relapse to a full-fledged nicotine addiction that if I am really lucky will lead to another full-blown withdrawal process one day soon, or, if I am not lucky is going to end up costing me tens of thousands of dollars, cost me my health and one day cost me my life."

If the answer to that questions is no, that today is not a good day to relapse, then remember for today that to stay smoke free is going to require a one hundred percent commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Sep 2006, 20:20 #42

From above:

This string was first written around the time of the September 2001 terrorism attack in the United States. The message of this string though is applicable for all times. We have a bunch of new quitters who may find themselves thinking that some external circumstance or event will make this particular timing of a quit not seem quite right. No problem a person quitting might encounter warrants or justifies administering nicotine.

The question that a person thinking that this may not be the best time to stay quit needs to as himself or herself is:

"Is this the right time to relapse to a full-fledged nicotine addiction that if I am really lucky will lead to another full-blown withdrawal process one day soon, or, if I am not lucky is going to end up costing me tens of thousands of dollars, cost me my health and one day cost me my life."

If the answer to that questions is no, that today is not a good day to relapse, then remember for today that to stay smoke free is going to require a one hundred percent commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Feb 2007, 08:59 #43

From above:

This string was first written around the time of the September 2001 terrorism attack in the United States. The message of this string though is applicable for all times. We have a bunch of new quitters who may find themselves thinking that some external circumstance or event will make this particular timing of a quit not seem quite right. No problem a person quitting might encounter warrants or justifies administering nicotine.

The question that a person thinking that this may not be the best time to stay quit needs to as himself or herself is:

"Is this the right time to relapse to a full-fledged nicotine addiction that if I am really lucky will lead to another full-blown withdrawal process one day soon, or, if I am not lucky is going to end up costing me tens of thousands of dollars, cost me my health and one day cost me my life."

If the answer to that questions is no, that today is not a good day to relapse, then remember for today that to stay smoke free is going to require a one hundred percent commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Apr 2008, 03:35 #44

I saw where a newer member was admiring another member who was quitting while dealing with a rather stressful time period. It worries me when I see comments like this because it makes me think that the person possibly feels that he or she may not be able to quit or stay off when encountering such stresses, or that it takes some extraordinary effort for people to quit or stay off under stressful times. That is not a philosophy that is really accepted here at Freedom. We feel that people can quit and stay off of smoking no matter what other situations they may encounter over their lifetime.

I am going to kick up a few other posts with this comment that all apply to this concept. It is crucial for all who read here to accept the fact that they will be able to stay off smoking under all times as long as they make and stick to a personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel

From above:

From above:

This string was first written around the time of the September 2001 terrorism attack in the United States. The message of this string though is applicable for all times. We have a bunch of new quitters who may find themselves thinking that some external circumstance or event will make this particular timing of a quit not seem quite right. No problem a person quitting might encounter warrants or justifies administering nicotine.

The question that a person thinking that this may not be the best time to stay quit needs to as himself or herself is:

"Is this the right time to relapse to a full-fledged nicotine addiction that if I am really lucky will lead to another full-blown withdrawal process one day soon, or, if I am not lucky is going to end up costing me tens of thousands of dollars, cost me my health and one day cost me my life."

If the answer to that questions is no, that today is not a good day to relapse, then remember for today that to stay smoke free is going to require a one hundred percent commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 May 2008, 09:49 #45

From above:

This string was first written around the time of the September 2001 terrorism attack in the United States. The message of this string though is applicable for all times. We have a bunch of new quitters who may find themselves thinking that some external circumstance or event will make this particular timing of a quit not seem quite right. No problem a person quitting might encounter warrants or justifies administering nicotine.

The question that a person thinking that this may not be the best time to stay quit needs to as himself or herself is:

"Is this the right time to relapse to a full-fledged nicotine addiction that if I am really lucky will lead to another full-blown withdrawal process one day soon, or, if I am not lucky is going to end up costing me tens of thousands of dollars, cost me my health and one day cost me my life."

If the answer to that questions is no, that today is not a good day to relapse, then remember for today that to stay smoke free is going to require a one hundred percent commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

02 Oct 2008, 02:30 #46

I saw where a newer member was admiring another member who was quitting while dealing with a rather stressful time period. It worries me when I see comments like this because it makes me think that the person possibly feels that he or she may not be able to quit or stay off when encountering such stresses, or that it takes some extraordinary effort for people to quit or stay off under stressful times. That is not a philosophy that is really accepted here at Freedom. We feel that people can quit and stay off of smoking no matter what other situations they may encounter over their lifetime.

I am going to kick up a few other posts with this comment that all apply to this concept. It is crucial for all who read here to accept the fact that they will be able to stay off smoking under all times as long as they make and stick to a personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel

Applicable commentary to this issue from above:

The question that a person thinking that this may not be the best time to stay quit needs to as himself or herself is:

"Is this the right time to relapse to a full-fledged nicotine addiction that if I am really lucky will lead to another full-blown withdrawal process one day soon, or, if I am not lucky is going to end up costing me tens of thousands of dollars, cost me my health and one day cost me my life."

If the answer to that questions is no, that today is not a good day to relapse, then remember for today that to stay smoke free is going to require a one hundred percent commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply

FreedomNicotine
Joined: 06 Dec 2008, 16:58

13 Sep 2010, 21:45 #47

I saw where a newer member was admiring another member who was quitting while dealing with a rather stressful time period. It worries me when I see comments like this because it makes me think that the person possibly feels that he or she may not be able to quit or stay off when encountering such stresses, or that it takes some extraordinary effort for people to quit or stay off under stressful times. That is not a philosophy that is really accepted here at Freedom. We feel that people can quit and stay off of smoking no matter what other situations they may encounter over their lifetime.

I am going to kick up a few other posts with this comment that all apply to this concept. It is crucial for all who read here to accept the fact that they will be able to stay off smoking under all times as long as they make and stick to a personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel

Applicable commentary to this issue from above:

The question that a person thinking that this may not be the best time to stay quit needs to as himself or herself is:

"Is this the right time to relapse to a full-fledged nicotine addiction that if I am really lucky will lead to another full-blown withdrawal process one day soon, or, if I am not lucky is going to end up costing me tens of thousands of dollars, cost me my health and one day cost me my life."

If the answer to that questions is no, that today is not a good day to relapse, then remember for today that to stay smoke free is going to require a one hundred percent commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply