Life goes on without smoking

Life goes on without smoking

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Apr 2002, 19:46 #1

It is important for all people who quit smoking to recognize that life goes on without smoking. Over time after a person quits smoking there will be changes: medical, psychological, professional, economic, life roles, relationships, etc. What is important to recognize though is that most of these changes would have occurred whether you had quit smoking or not or even whether or not you ever smoked. As many of my friends are now in their mid-forties and fifties, it is amazing how we share stories of new ailments and new medications being introduced into our lives. Some of these people had quit smoking decades ago, some of them never smoked. None of the ex-smokers bring up a new disorder and say or think to themselves that it must be happening now because they quit smoking ten or twenty years ago. It would be like a person who never smoked who finds out they now have high blood pressure and then thinks to him or herself that it must be because he or she stopped using some product twenty years ago. As we age things happen-it is just the way things go.

If a person gets diagnosed with a smoking related ailment like emphysema or lung cancer years or decades after quitting it is likely that their mind is shifted to think about their past smoking. But medical and psychological conditions that are experienced by smokers and non-smokers alike, the concept of smoking or quitting should not be considered a primary focus anymore.

Smoking did not cause everything. It causes a whole lot of things though and many things that it does not cause, it makes worse. On the same token, quitting does not cause everything. Quitting is usually accompanied with many repairs, but there are also some adjustments (see Medication adjustments) that go on that may need a partnership with your physicians to get worked out.

My general rule of advice is whatever happens the first few days of a quit, whether it is physical or psychological reactions, blame it on not smoking. It is probably the cause of most early quit reactions. If it is a symptom to a condition that could be life threatening, such as severe chest pains or signs or symptoms of a stroke-contact your doctor immediately. While it is probably nothing and just a side effect of quitting, in the long shot that it is something else coincidentally happening the week you are quitting, you need to get it checked out.

Things happening weeks, months, years or decades after your quits though should not ever be assumed to be a quit smoking reaction. It is life going on without smoking. Some of these things may trigger smoking thoughts-especially if they are similar to conditions you did have in the past when you were a smoker. The situation now is a first time experience with a prior feeling where smoking was integrated thus creating smoking thoughts. But even in this case, the condition is creating a smoking thought, it is not that your smoking memories or your smoking past is creating the condition.

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel

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Last edited by Joel on 01 Aug 2013, 13:03, edited 7 times in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Jul 2002, 04:42 #2

I saw a few newer members bringing up issues that have happened over the past week that were stressful or troubling and noting that they recognized that these events and the feelings they were eliciting were independent and unrelated to smoking and/or quitting. This ability to separate out what is an effect of quitting from what are normal reactions to life just going on after quitting is crucial to sustaining a quit for all. Everything that you can face and overcome as a smoker--you will face and overcome better without smoking. Also, by quitting you are reducing your risks of facing future problems that cigarettes could have caused if given the opportunity--problems that threatened your health and even your life. To be better equipped to deal with life under good times and bad always remember the importance of knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Anticea
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:44

13 Jul 2002, 16:42 #3

Joel,

Thanks! Image

Lisa (Anticea)
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Lilac (Bronze)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

29 Sep 2002, 21:59 #4

My family used to say to me, "If you say you can't quit now., will it be easier to quit when you have emphysema and can't smoke?" I was headed down that road. It is extremely unlikely that I will venture there again. I have a Grandson who still likes to have me around in good health. Lilac
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Pelican1(Bronze)
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:59

23 Oct 2002, 09:18 #5

Yes life does go on,,,my smell has returned and the funny thing is is that I did not realise it was gone until I quit, and its just 2 weeks, looking forward to whats to come.
Pelican,
1 week 6 days and 17 minutes
Image
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Pelican1(Bronze)
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:59

04 Nov 2002, 10:23 #6

ImageFor Joel,
Thankyou for the educationImage and tough love
Pelican
25 days nicotene free
one day at a time
never takin another puff
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Nov 2002, 17:54 #7

Image For people who are off for weeks, months, years or decades and who are cranky, nervous, depressed, angry, have sore throats, earahces, backaches, headaches, eye strains, poor vision, hearing problems, broken bones, have stubbed their toes, have financial concerns, job stresses, or any other extraordinary issues going on in their lives at the moment. Don't blame every feeling, bad or good in your life on the fact that you happened to have quit smoking. Life goes on without smoking and as the closing paragraph in this article states:

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

22 Nov 2002, 22:24 #8

I saw a couple of people who could benefit from reading this one today.
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sharonah silver
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:08

22 Feb 2003, 19:15 #9

Sounds like this posting was written just for me. It is exactly what I needed to hear right now. Thank you.

Sharonah

1 month, 15 hours, 17 minutes and ever counting up.
380 stinky, smelly cigs still on store shelves
$72.70 saved
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

29 Mar 2003, 06:12 #10

Image In honor of Ceasefire's post.
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