Life goes on without smoking

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 May 2003, 04:14 #11

My general rule of advice is whatever happens the first few days of a quit, whether it is physical or psychological reactions, blame it on not smoking. It is probably the cause of most early quit reactions. If it is a symptom to a condition that could be life threatening, such as severe chest pains or signs or symptoms of a stroke-contact your doctor immediately. While it is probably nothing and just a side effect of quitting, in the long shot that it is something else coincidentally happening the week you are quitting, you need to get it checked out.

Things happening weeks, months, years or decades after your quits though should not ever be assumed to be a quit smoking reaction. It is life going on without smoking.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 Jun 2003, 23:40 #12

Image I thought Janet would appreciate this.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Oct 2003, 11:52 #13

"For people who are off for weeks, months, years or decades and who are cranky, nervous, depressed, angry, have sore throats, earahces, backaches, headaches, eye strains, poor vision, hearing problems, broken bones, have stubbed their toes, have financial concerns, job stresses, or any other extraordinary issues going on in their lives at the moment. Don't blame every feeling, bad or good in your life on the fact that you happened to have quit smoking. Life goes on without smoking and as the closing paragraph in this article states:

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!"
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Oct 2003, 06:59 #14

Image I think Linz was looking for this one.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Oct 2003, 15:08 #15

I wrote this piece as a reply to a member who was concerned about why her first experience with PMS seemed intensified after she had quit smoking. Periodically a newer member brings up this question and I wanted to have this response easy to find when the question arises on the board. This string seems a particularly appropriate place to put this response.

You are very likely experiencing more smoking thoughts at the moment because of your PMS symptoms. This is not saying that sustaining your quit will be difficult every time you experience a menstrual cycle, or that your symptoms are going to be better or worse than they were when you were smoking. It is just likely that the first time you experience your normal monthly cycle smoking thoughts are going to be triggered.

The same thing happens to men and women when there is any change in a physical situation, especially one that they have encountered numerous times in the past. It is like when people catch colds or a flues for the first time after quitting. Every other time they had colds or a flu during their adult years they were smokers. Their rate of smoking was likely affected by these infections. When symptoms were peaking, meaning when their throats were real raw and breathing difficult they likely cut back to a bare minimum amount of smoking. They were likely experiencing increases in withdrawal symptoms whenever they had such infections. When the cold or fly symptoms finally started to dissipate, they likely increased their consumption quickly in an effort to get their nicotine levels where they need to be to stave off withdrawal.

This phenomena could easily result in a person getting increased thoughts for cigarettes the first time they get an infection after quitting. It may not be so much so when they first get sick, but more likely when they first start to get well after being sick. The change in status from feeling ill to feeling normal is a new trigger circumstance for the person.

Keep in mind, it is only new the first time a person goes though this kind of change of physical status. The next time they get a similar infection the thoughts are likely to be less pronounced and after numerous repeats the thoughts toward smoking will likely become non-existent. Not smoking will become a habit for a sick or recovering person. The same principle applies to the normal changes in your body that you are experiencing during your monthly cycles. The first time is quite awkward with smoking thoughts being triggered more than normal. Over time though these thoughts will not likely occur for you will have broken the associations from surviving through the first encounters with your quit intact.

You can go through our board's go back one month option and see how many of the woman at our site seem to have panicking posts complaining of intense smoking thoughts month after month after month on any kind of regular pattern. The fact is there are no such posts on the board because after the first few months not smoking becomes a habit even during times of menstruation.

To keep this quit on the course of getting easier and easier over time is still just as simple as staying totally committed even during tough times to the commitment you made when you first joined up to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Nov 2003, 22:25 #16

Image I think Lyverbird will appreciate this one.
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Lyverbyrd
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

16 Nov 2003, 19:34 #17

Thanks Joel.

NTAP.Image
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Aug 2004, 03:48 #18

I saw the issue of PMS raised by a member just making it to the one month mark. I wrote this last year for another member who was asking a similar question about PMS as it relates to quitting: You are very likely experiencing more smoking thoughts at the moment because of your PMS symptoms. This is not saying that sustaining your quit will be difficult every time you experience a menstrual cycle, or that your symptoms are going to be better or worse than they were when you were smoking. It is just likely that the first time you experience your normal monthly cycle smoking thoughts are going to be triggered.

The same thing happens to men and women when there is any change in a physical situation, especially one that they have encountered numerous times in the past. It is like when people catch colds or a flues for the first time after quitting. Every other time they had colds or a flu during their adult years they were smokers. Their rate of smoking was likely affected by these infections. When symptoms were peaking, meaning when their throats were real raw and breathing difficult they likely cut back to a bare minimum amount of smoking. They were likely experiencing increases in withdrawal symptoms whenever they had such infections. When the cold or fly symptoms finally started to dissipate, they likely increased their consumption quickly in an effort to get their nicotine levels where they need to be to stave off withdrawal.

This phenomena could easily result in a person getting increased thoughts for cigarettes the first time they get an infection after quitting. It may not be so much so when they first get sick, but more likely when they first start to get well after being sick. The change in status from feeling ill to feeling normal is a new trigger circumstance for the person.

Keep in mind, it is only new the first time a person goes though this kind of change of physical status. The next time they get a similar infection the thoughts are likely to be less pronounced and after numerous repeats the thoughts toward smoking will likely become non-existent. Not smoking will become a habit for a sick or recovering person. The same principle applies to the normal changes in your body that you are experiencing during your monthly cycles. The first time is quite awkward with smoking thoughts being triggered more than normal. Over time though these thoughts will not likely occur for you will have broken the associations from surviving through the first encounters with your quit intact.

You can go through our board's go back one month option and see how many of the woman at our site seem to have panicking posts complaining of intense smoking thoughts month after month after month on any kind of regular pattern. The fact is there are no such posts on the board because after the first few months not smoking becomes a habit even during times of menstruation.

To keep this quit on the course of getting easier and easier over time is still just as simple as staying totally committed even during tough times to the commitment you made when you first joined up to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Aug 2004, 18:53 #19

From: Joel. Sent: 7/7/2002 3:42 PM
I saw a few newer members bringing up issues that have happened over the past week that were stressful or troubling and noting that they recognized that these events and the feelings they were eliciting were independent and unrelated to smoking and/or quitting. This ability to separate out what is an effect of quitting from what are normal reactions to life just going on after quitting is crucial to sustaining a quit for all. Everything that you can face and overcome as a smoker--you will face and overcome better without smoking. Also, by quitting you are reducing your risks of facing future problems that cigarettes could have caused if given the opportunity--problems that threatened your health and even your life. To be better equipped to deal with life under good times and bad always remember the importance of knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Sep 2004, 22:38 #20

My general rule of advice is whatever happens the first few days of a quit, whether it is physical or psychological reactions, blame it on not smoking. It is probably the cause of most early quit reactions. If it is a symptom to a condition that could be life threatening, such as severe chest pains or signs or symptoms of a stroke-contact your doctor immediately. While it is probably nothing and just a side effect of quitting, in the long shot that it is something else coincidentally happening the week you are quitting, you need to get it checked out.

Things happening weeks, months, years or decades after your quits though should not ever be assumed to be a quit smoking reaction. It is life going on without smoking. Some of these things may trigger smoking thoughts-especially if they are similar to conditions you did have in the past when you were a smoker. The situation now is a first time experience with a prior feeling where smoking was integrates thus creating smoking thoughts. But even in this case, the condition is creating a smoking thought, it is not that your smoking memories or your smoking past is creating the condition.

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply