Joel
Joel

May 11th, 2003, 4:14 am #11

My general rule of advice is whatever happens the first few days of a quit, whether it is physical or psychological reactions, blame it on not smoking. It is probably the cause of most early quit reactions. If it is a symptom to a condition that could be life threatening, such as severe chest pains or signs or symptoms of a stroke-contact your doctor immediately. While it is probably nothing and just a side effect of quitting, in the long shot that it is something else coincidentally happening the week you are quitting, you need to get it checked out.

Things happening weeks, months, years or decades after your quits though should not ever be assumed to be a quit smoking reaction. It is life going on without smoking.
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

June 1st, 2003, 11:40 pm #12

I thought Janet would appreciate this.
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

October 7th, 2003, 11:52 am #13

"For people who are off for weeks, months, years or decades and who are cranky, nervous, depressed, angry, have sore throats, earahces, backaches, headaches, eye strains, poor vision, hearing problems, broken bones, have stubbed their toes, have financial concerns, job stresses, or any other extraordinary issues going on in their lives at the moment. Don't blame every feeling, bad or good in your life on the fact that you happened to have quit smoking. Life goes on without smoking and as the closing paragraph in this article states:

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!"
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

October 9th, 2003, 6:59 am #14

I think Linz was looking for this one.
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

October 23rd, 2003, 3:08 pm #15

I wrote this piece as a reply to a member who was concerned about why her first experience with PMS seemed intensified after she had quit smoking. Periodically a newer member brings up this question and I wanted to have this response easy to find when the question arises on the board. This string seems a particularly appropriate place to put this response.

You are very likely experiencing more smoking thoughts at the moment because of your PMS symptoms. This is not saying that sustaining your quit will be difficult every time you experience a menstrual cycle, or that your symptoms are going to be better or worse than they were when you were smoking. It is just likely that the first time you experience your normal monthly cycle smoking thoughts are going to be triggered.

The same thing happens to men and women when there is any change in a physical situation, especially one that they have encountered numerous times in the past. It is like when people catch colds or a flues for the first time after quitting. Every other time they had colds or a flu during their adult years they were smokers. Their rate of smoking was likely affected by these infections. When symptoms were peaking, meaning when their throats were real raw and breathing difficult they likely cut back to a bare minimum amount of smoking. They were likely experiencing increases in withdrawal symptoms whenever they had such infections. When the cold or fly symptoms finally started to dissipate, they likely increased their consumption quickly in an effort to get their nicotine levels where they need to be to stave off withdrawal.

This phenomena could easily result in a person getting increased thoughts for cigarettes the first time they get an infection after quitting. It may not be so much so when they first get sick, but more likely when they first start to get well after being sick. The change in status from feeling ill to feeling normal is a new trigger circumstance for the person.

Keep in mind, it is only new the first time a person goes though this kind of change of physical status. The next time they get a similar infection the thoughts are likely to be less pronounced and after numerous repeats the thoughts toward smoking will likely become non-existent. Not smoking will become a habit for a sick or recovering person. The same principle applies to the normal changes in your body that you are experiencing during your monthly cycles. The first time is quite awkward with smoking thoughts being triggered more than normal. Over time though these thoughts will not likely occur for you will have broken the associations from surviving through the first encounters with your quit intact.

You can go through our board's go back one month option and see how many of the woman at our site seem to have panicking posts complaining of intense smoking thoughts month after month after month on any kind of regular pattern. The fact is there are no such posts on the board because after the first few months not smoking becomes a habit even during times of menstruation.

To keep this quit on the course of getting easier and easier over time is still just as simple as staying totally committed even during tough times to the commitment you made when you first joined up to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

November 15th, 2003, 10:25 pm #16

I think Lyverbird will appreciate this one.
Quote
Share

Lyverbyrd
Lyverbyrd

November 16th, 2003, 7:34 pm #17

Thanks Joel.

NTAP.
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

August 8th, 2004, 3:48 am #18

I saw the issue of PMS raised by a member just making it to the one month mark. I wrote this last year for another member who was asking a similar question about PMS as it relates to quitting: You are very likely experiencing more smoking thoughts at the moment because of your PMS symptoms. This is not saying that sustaining your quit will be difficult every time you experience a menstrual cycle, or that your symptoms are going to be better or worse than they were when you were smoking. It is just likely that the first time you experience your normal monthly cycle smoking thoughts are going to be triggered.

The same thing happens to men and women when there is any change in a physical situation, especially one that they have encountered numerous times in the past. It is like when people catch colds or a flues for the first time after quitting. Every other time they had colds or a flu during their adult years they were smokers. Their rate of smoking was likely affected by these infections. When symptoms were peaking, meaning when their throats were real raw and breathing difficult they likely cut back to a bare minimum amount of smoking. They were likely experiencing increases in withdrawal symptoms whenever they had such infections. When the cold or fly symptoms finally started to dissipate, they likely increased their consumption quickly in an effort to get their nicotine levels where they need to be to stave off withdrawal.

This phenomena could easily result in a person getting increased thoughts for cigarettes the first time they get an infection after quitting. It may not be so much so when they first get sick, but more likely when they first start to get well after being sick. The change in status from feeling ill to feeling normal is a new trigger circumstance for the person.

Keep in mind, it is only new the first time a person goes though this kind of change of physical status. The next time they get a similar infection the thoughts are likely to be less pronounced and after numerous repeats the thoughts toward smoking will likely become non-existent. Not smoking will become a habit for a sick or recovering person. The same principle applies to the normal changes in your body that you are experiencing during your monthly cycles. The first time is quite awkward with smoking thoughts being triggered more than normal. Over time though these thoughts will not likely occur for you will have broken the associations from surviving through the first encounters with your quit intact.

You can go through our board's go back one month option and see how many of the woman at our site seem to have panicking posts complaining of intense smoking thoughts month after month after month on any kind of regular pattern. The fact is there are no such posts on the board because after the first few months not smoking becomes a habit even during times of menstruation.

To keep this quit on the course of getting easier and easier over time is still just as simple as staying totally committed even during tough times to the commitment you made when you first joined up to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

August 12th, 2004, 6:53 pm #19

From: Joel. Sent: 7/7/2002 3:42 PM
I saw a few newer members bringing up issues that have happened over the past week that were stressful or troubling and noting that they recognized that these events and the feelings they were eliciting were independent and unrelated to smoking and/or quitting. This ability to separate out what is an effect of quitting from what are normal reactions to life just going on after quitting is crucial to sustaining a quit for all. Everything that you can face and overcome as a smoker--you will face and overcome better without smoking. Also, by quitting you are reducing your risks of facing future problems that cigarettes could have caused if given the opportunity--problems that threatened your health and even your life. To be better equipped to deal with life under good times and bad always remember the importance of knowing to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

September 23rd, 2004, 10:38 pm #20

My general rule of advice is whatever happens the first few days of a quit, whether it is physical or psychological reactions, blame it on not smoking. It is probably the cause of most early quit reactions. If it is a symptom to a condition that could be life threatening, such as severe chest pains or signs or symptoms of a stroke-contact your doctor immediately. While it is probably nothing and just a side effect of quitting, in the long shot that it is something else coincidentally happening the week you are quitting, you need to get it checked out.

Things happening weeks, months, years or decades after your quits though should not ever be assumed to be a quit smoking reaction. It is life going on without smoking. Some of these things may trigger smoking thoughts-especially if they are similar to conditions you did have in the past when you were a smoker. The situation now is a first time experience with a prior feeling where smoking was integrates thus creating smoking thoughts. But even in this case, the condition is creating a smoking thought, it is not that your smoking memories or your smoking past is creating the condition.

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

kattatonic1 gold4
kattatonic1 gold4

December 7th, 2004, 8:29 pm #21

When life throws you lemons, something wonderful you can do for yourself and those who love you is to hang on to your quit tightly!

(You thought I was going to say, "Make lemonade". Didn't you?)
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

February 19th, 2005, 2:26 am #22

I thought Karen would appreciate this one.
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

February 18th, 2006, 8:47 pm #23

A member just wrote me saying that the link to medication adjustment in this string is not working.
Here is the text that was in that string:
Medication Adjustments
Often when people quit smoking they may find that medications that were adjusted for them while smoking may be altered in effectiveness once quitting. People on hypertensives, thyroid, depression, blood sugar drugs, and others may need to get re-evaluated for proper dosages once quitting.
The first few days quitting can be very difficult to determine, what is a "normal" withdrawal and what is a medication dosage issue. But once through the first few days, if a person who is on medications for medical disorders finds him or herself having physical symptoms that just seem out of the ordinary, he or she should speak to the doctor who has him or her on the medications. Point out to the doctor that you have recently quit smoking and started to notice the specific symptoms just after quitting and that they haven't improved over time. The doctor should know the medication and potential interaction that not smoking may be adjusting for and which way the dosing may need to altered.
Treating many conditions is a partnership between you and your physician. The doctor needs your input to effectiveness of any treatment, whether it be by physical measurements or by verbally communicating how you feel while under treatment. The treatment for one condition though is your primary responsibility. The condition--nicotine addiction. It is by no means a minor medical issue, it is in fact probably the greatest controlable health threat anyone will ever face. Afterall, what other lifestyle issues carry a 50% premature mortality rate? Not to mention all the other crippling side effects that go along with long-term smoking. The treatment for this condition is your primary responsibility. To effectively treat smoking for the rest of your life simply remember to never take another puff!
Joel
Here is the updated link to the Medication Adjustment thread.
Last edited by Joel on October 18th, 2009, 3:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

May 22nd, 2006, 7:49 pm #24

"For people who are off for weeks, months, years or decades and who are cranky, nervous, depressed, angry, have sore throats, heart burn, ear aches, backaches, headaches, eye strains, poor vision, hearing problems, broken bones, have stubbed their toes, have financial concerns, job stresses, or any other extraordinary issues going on in their lives at the moment. Don't blame every feeling, bad or good in your life on the fact that you happened to have quit smoking. Life goes on without smoking and as the closing paragraph in this article states:

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!"
Quote
Share

GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

May 30th, 2006, 9:55 pm #25

From: Joel Sent: 5/22/2006 7:49 AM
"For people who are off for weeks, months, years or decades and who are cranky, nervous, depressed, angry, have sore throats, heart burn, ear aches, backaches, headaches, eye strains, poor vision, hearing problems, broken bones, have stubbed their toes, have financial concerns, job stresses, or any other extraordinary issues going on in their lives at the moment. Don't blame every feeling, bad or good in your life on the fact that you happened to have quit smoking. Life goes on without smoking and as the closing paragraph in this article states:

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!"
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

June 1st, 2006, 8:38 pm #26

"For people who are off for weeks, months, years or decades and who are cranky, nervous, depressed, angry, have sore throats, heart burn, ear aches, backaches, headaches, eye strains, poor vision, hearing problems, broken bones, have stubbed their toes, have financial concerns, job stresses, or any other extraordinary issues going on in their lives at the moment. Don't blame every feeling, bad or good in your life on the fact that you happened to have quit smoking. Life goes on without smoking and as the closing paragraph in this article states:

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!"
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

June 7th, 2006, 7:30 pm #27

"For people who are off for weeks, months, years or decades and who are cranky, nervous, depressed, angry, have sore throats, heart burn, ear aches, backaches, headaches, eye strains, poor vision, hearing problems, broken bones, have stubbed their toes, have financial concerns, job stresses, or any other extraordinary issues going on in their lives at the moment. Don't blame every feeling, bad or good in your life on the fact that you happened to have quit smoking. Life goes on without smoking and as the closing paragraph in this article states:

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!"
Quote
Share

GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

June 16th, 2006, 2:01 am #28

Smoking did not cause everything. It causes a whole lot of things though and many things that it does not cause, it makes worse. On the same token, quitting does not cause everything. Quitting is usually accompanied with many repairs, but there are also some adjustments (see Medication adjustments) that go on that may need a partnership with your physicians to get worked out.

My general rule of advice is whatever happens the first few days of a quit, whether it is physical or psychological reactions, blame it on not smoking. It is probably the cause of most early quit reactions. If it is a symptom to a condition that could be life threatening, such as severe chest pains or signs or symptoms of a stroke-contact your doctor immediately. While it is probably nothing and just a side effect of quitting, in the long shot that it is something else coincidentally happening the week you are quitting, you need to get it checked out.

Things happening weeks, months, years or decades after your quits though should not ever be assumed to be a quit smoking reaction. It is life going on without smoking. Some of these things may trigger smoking thoughts-especially if they are similar to conditions you did have in the past when you were a smoker. The situation now is a first time experience with a prior feeling where smoking was integrates thus creating smoking thoughts. But even in this case, the condition is creating a smoking thought, it is not that your smoking memories or your smoking past is creating the condition.

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

auntvaleria
auntvaleria

June 16th, 2006, 11:31 am #29

For people who are off for weeks, months, years or decades and who are cranky, nervous, depressed, Life goes on without smoking.....
One day at a time and NTAP!

aunt valeria
I have been quit for 3 Months, 2 Weeks, 6 Days, 3 hours, 1 minute and 39 seconds (112 days). I have saved $308.34 by not smoking 2,242 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Week, 18 hours and 50 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 2/23/2006 7:30 PM
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

July 11th, 2006, 11:55 pm #30

"For people who are off for weeks, months, years or decades and who are cranky, nervous, depressed, angry, have sore throats, heart burn, ear aches, backaches, headaches, eye strains, poor vision, hearing problems, broken bones, have stubbed their toes, have financial concerns, job stresses, or any other extraordinary issues going on in their lives at the moment. Don't blame every feeling, bad or good in your life on the fact that you happened to have quit smoking. Life goes on without smoking and as the closing paragraph in this article states:

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!"
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

July 13th, 2006, 12:13 am #31

"For people who are off for weeks, months, years or decades and who are cranky, nervous, depressed, angry, have sore throats, heart burn, ear aches, backaches, headaches, eye strains, poor vision, hearing problems, broken bones, have stubbed their toes, have financial concerns, job stresses, or any other extraordinary issues going on in their lives at the moment. Don't blame every feeling, bad or good in your life on the fact that you happened to have quit smoking. Life goes on without smoking and as the closing paragraph in this article states:

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!"
Quote
Share

JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

July 18th, 2006, 1:28 am #32

"It is important for all people who quit smoking to recognize that life goes on without smoking. Over time after a person quits smoking there will be changes: medical, psychological, professional, economic, life roles, relationships, etc. What is important to recognize though is that most of these changes would have occurred whether you had quit smoking or not or even whether or not you ever smoked"

- from the start of Joel's post above.



I'd like to add that handling stress also falls into this category. Stress, anxiety, fear: all types of emotions happen to never smokers / non-smokers as well as us ex-smokers and to active smokers too. How we react to or acknowledge and handle those outside influences is a learned skill. For Non-Smokers they do not have a link to tobacco or nicotine in regards to stress. Stress is simply a reaction to external stimuli to be dealt with. For us ex-smokers we eventually learn to disassociate stress from our former nicotine consumption activities. We learn that smoking tobacco did not cause or relieve stress - it only releived the anxiety created by the 'fight or flight' reaction to dropping nicotine levels. Active addicts have a built in source of stress - how to keep their nicotine levels elevated enough to postpone withdrawal until they can consume another dose. The nicotine does not relieve stress, it releives it's own absence which then reduces withdrawal anxiety - temporarily until the level drops again in 30 to 60 minutes.

One of my earliest thoughts about becoming an ex-smoker was that other people in my life who did not use tobacco and were not (actively) addicted to nicotine were able to live their lives - make decisions, deal with disappointment, adapt to new stimuli, deal with the death of a loved one, handle stressful situations ..... live their lives without the thought of smoking tobacco. I wanted to get back to that state of living free. If they could then so could I.

What I know now after a year and a half - It takes time to heal, not a day, not a week, not a month not any 'time limit'. We each heal at our own pace of understanding and accpetance. But know this - you can and will learn to live your life without consciously linking everything to a thought of smoking tobacco. My quit bro Bruce wrote about just that today.

See this one also: Decisions - are you making them?

NTAP & you too will learn to live naturally - nicotine clean and free - as we were meant to be.

JoeJ Free - NicotineFree and Living as I was meant to be for One Year, Six Months, Seven Days, 2 Hours and 52 Minutes, while reclaiming 48 Days,  by choosing not to use 13828 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $2,794.06.
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on December 15th, 2011, 6:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

July 26th, 2006, 8:16 pm #33

"For people who are off for weeks, months, years or decades and who are cranky, nervous, depressed, angry, have sore throats, heart burn, ear aches, backaches, headaches, eye strains, poor vision, hearing problems, broken bones, have stubbed their toes, have financial concerns, job stresses, or any other extraordinary issues going on in their lives at the moment. Don't blame every feeling, bad or good in your life on the fact that you happened to have quit smoking. Life goes on without smoking and as the closing paragraph in this article states:

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!"
Quote
Share

GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

July 29th, 2006, 12:57 am #34

From: Joel Sent: 7/26/2006 8:16 AM
"For people who are off for weeks, months, years or decades and who are cranky, nervous, depressed, angry, have sore throats, heart burn, ear aches, backaches, headaches, eye strains, poor vision, hearing problems, broken bones, have stubbed their toes, have financial concerns, job stresses, or any other extraordinary issues going on in their lives at the moment. Don't blame every feeling, bad or good in your life on the fact that you happened to have quit smoking. Life goes on without smoking and as the closing paragraph in this article states:

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!"

Linda gold X 6
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

July 31st, 2006, 9:01 pm #35

For people who are off for weeks, months, years or decades and who are cranky, nervous, depressed, angry, have sore throats, heart burn, ear aches, backaches, headaches, eye strains, poor vision, hearing problems, broken bones, have stubbed their toes, have financial concerns, job stresses, or any other extraordinary issues going on in their lives at the moment. Don't blame every feeling, bad or good in your life on the fact that you happened to have quit smoking. Life goes on without smoking and as the closing paragraph in this article states:

Life goes on without smoking. It is likely to go on longer and it is likely that you will be healthier at each and every stage than you would have been if you had continued smoking. Your life will continue to stay better and likely last long longer as long as you always remember to never take another puff!
Quote
Share