"Just think about something else."

Subconscious use cue extinguishment
Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Feb 2006, 09:43 #31

I am not saying to look at cigarettes negatively, just look at them exactly as they really were. If you pull the whole spectrum of smoking into focus, you will be able to walk away from the "urge" with the attitude that you are glad you are not doing that anymore. You won't feel deprived you will feel grateful. The more you remember smoking the less you will think about a cigarette. In a sense forcing yourself to remember will help you forget. Not forget smoking, but the fantasy, the appeal of a nicotine fix. A nicotine fix was not worth smoking for while you were a smoker, you can bet it is not worth it as an ex-smoker with freedom to lose now as well as all the other implications that always went with smoking.

In summing up, I will say that not smoking will never seem as good as the fantasy of smoking. But smoking was never that good either. The fantasy is "one" with no side effects, and no loss of control. The reality though is a dirty, disgusting, and deadly addiction. See them for what they are and you will stop wanting them as much.

Again, it can't be said too often, you are fighting for your health and your life. To win this fight is no more complicated than just keeping your commitment enforced to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply

whosthisitsmesilly
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

25 Mar 2006, 20:57 #32

Image This is exactly what works for me.



I have been quit for 2 Weeks, 3 Days, 12 hours, 57 minutes and 33 seconds (17 days). I have saved £72.78 by not smoking 350 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Day, 5 hours and 10 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 08/03/2006 00:00

Cathy
Reply

abtabbb
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:44

04 Apr 2006, 13:24 #33

I haven't been reading your writting much but you can be assured that now I will. I think you will be giving me real help.Image Thank you. I'm on day 14.
Reply

NewLife011806
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:45

06 Apr 2006, 10:56 #34

This is EXACTLY correct. About ten days ago I actually drove up to a convenience store with the determination to buy a pack of cigarettes and smoke one cigarette. I had been "obsessing" over that one cigarette for so long that I told myself to just do it. But as I drove up to the store I realized that I was fooling myself to think I would stop at one cigarette, and I told myself that the only way I was going to allow myself to purchase cigarettes in that store would be to purchase a carton, with the full expectation that I was going to be smoking that carton. This brought back all the disgusting and debilitating memories of what smoking is really all about, whittled down that "fantasy" cigarette to what it is: A FANTASY, and put an end to the obsessing I had been doing over it. I never even parked the car in the parking lot. No sooner did I pull up to the store than I put my car in reverse and drove away from there, freed from the lie and the pull of my addiction to an extent I'd never experienced before then. My quit has taken on a whole new dimension since then and I am so enjoying my non-smoking, nicotine-free life!!!
Reply

John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Jun 2006, 02:21 #35

Think honestly about that best cigarette ever. Can you locate one memory? Do you have one now? If so, my guess is that it is either follows a rather lengthy period of having gone without smoking nicotine or is associated with some underlying wonderful memory that would have still been wonderful as a comfortable ex-smoker.

In all honesty, I can't count the number of times I looked down and the ashtray was full and the pack empty, yet I had no memory of having smoked them. Joel wrote a wonderful piece about actually challenging seminar participants who claimed to love smoking to identify all the "good" or "memorable" cigarettes they'd smoked that day. They'd come up with a few, the first in the morning, the one after lunch and maybe a couple of others. But then Joel would remind them that they  had a rather serious math problem on their hands. They'd claimed to be a pack-a-day smoker who loved smoking but if true had kissed their lover at least fifteen additional times every day without any memory of ever having done so.

Here Joel asks us to be honest with ourselves. For years we were forced to provide mental justification as to why we would smoke that next cigarette. As Joel says, it wasn't so much that we liked smoking but that we didn't like what happened when we didn't smoke. The ironic part is that the longer we were forced to go without a nicotine fix the more intense and memorable our eventual nicotine refueling was.

Don't hide from smoking fantasies but instead challenge and bathe each in honest light. Flavor, taste? There are zero taste buds inside human lungs. Relaxation? Nicotine is a central nervous system stimulant that makes the heart pound faster, that elevates blood pressure and perks the senses.

Stress relief? Nicotine is an alkaloid and stress an acid generating event which neutralized our reserves. All smoking nicotine did was relieve its own absence. The flat tire or other underlying stressful event remained untouched. We simply added the onset of early withdrawal to every stress event life threw our way. If it hasn't arrived yet you may be about to earn and realize an amazing sense of calm during crisis.

Challenge any lingering romantic smoking fixations. Sanity, dignity and self respect are important to all humans. We knew that each and every puff was destroying a bit more of our body's ability to receive and transport life giving oxygen. We knew that we were committing slow suicide by our own hand. We had no choice to fabricate sufficient justification for that next fix.

But now is time for honesty. In truth it didn't matter what line we fed our minds. We'd lost all choice on the day nicotine took control. We are true drug addicts whose brains had become permanently wired for nicotine. That next fix was mandatory regardless of the rationalizations we adopted.

Just one tiny rule determining the outcome for all ... no nicotine today! Yes you can, yes you have, yes you are!!

John (Gold x7)

Last edited by John (Gold) on 11 Aug 2010, 13:47, edited 1 time in total.
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Jun 2006, 20:05 #36

I am not saying to look at cigarettes negatively, just look at them exactly as they really were. If you pull the whole spectrum of smoking into focus, you will be able to walk away from the "urge" with the attitude that you are glad you are not doing that anymore. You won't feel deprived you will feel grateful. The more you remember smoking the less you will think about a cigarette. In a sense forcing yourself to remember will help you forget. Not forget smoking, but the fantasy, the appeal of a nicotine fix. A nicotine fix was not worth smoking for while you were a smoker, you can bet it is not worth it as an ex-smoker with freedom to lose now as well as all the other implications that always went with smoking.

In summing up, I will say that not smoking will never seem as good as the fantasy of smoking. But smoking was never that good either. The fantasy is "one" with no side effects, and no loss of control. The reality though is a dirty, disgusting, and deadly addiction. See them for what they are and you will stop wanting them as much.

Again, it can't be said too often, you are fighting for your health and your life. To win this fight is no more complicated than just keeping your commitment enforced to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply

Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

28 Feb 2007, 08:19 #37

Again, it can't be said too often, you are fighting for your health and your life. To win this fight is no more complicated than just keeping your commitment enforced to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply

EtherBunny73
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

14 Nov 2008, 07:03 #38

This is a great thread.

Being honest with myself about what it's really like to smoke helped me protect my quit today.
Reply

NoNic4Neal
Joined: 14 Jan 2011, 00:33

25 Jan 2011, 17:23 #39

This was a helpful post for today, my sixteenth day of freedom. I know I lost previous quit attempts to fantasizing about that perfect cigarrette. I just calculated that my last puff on that fantasy cigarette lead to 13,688 more cigarettes before gaining the strengh to quit again. This time I have Freedom and Why Quit on my side. No nicotine today.
Neal
Reply