"Just think about something else."

Subconscious use cue extinguishment
John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

29 Jan 2004, 21:39 #21

Over 4 million deaths in 2003 and a 50% adult kill rate.
Can truth help set us free?
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wackylaurie
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:33

14 Feb 2004, 23:25 #22

Great Post!
I have not read this one before. "Just think of something else" Geez... I thought how lame. Please dont give me such rubbish to read ... if it was that simple no one would have a problem.
Glad I read this! I will not judge a post by it's title anymore!

In summing up, I will say that not smoking will never seem as good as the fantasy of smoking. But smoking was never that good either. The fantasy is "one" with no side effects, and no loss of control. The reality though is a dirty, disgusting, and deadly addiction. See them for what they are and you will stop wanting them as much.
ImageLaurie
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Feb 2004, 23:31 #23

Hello Laurie, Generally if you see a title in one of my posts surrounded in "quotation marks", it usually means that there is more to the title than meets they eye. It is often a title that is a tongue in cheek comment or it is a quote that would be said by another person and the post I am putting up is addressing the topic that the person has raised.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Feb 2004, 23:39 #24

Other examples of "quotation mark" titled threads:

"Boy, do I miss smoking!"

"I think I have decided to go back to smoking"

"I made a conscious decision to smoke."

"Maybe I am different?"

"I'm mad that I can't smoke anymore!"

"Why Did I Start Smoking?" "Why Did I Quit?"

"I went back to smoking when I was in the hospital with pneumonia."

"Things were just so bad at work that I took a cigarette!"

"Your Stupid Letters"

"If they ever cure lung cancer, I would go back to smoking."

"I guess I am doing OK, I just smoked one yesterday"

"I've relapsed." A cry for help or a cry for attention?

"Dying for a cigarette!"

"I'm safe from smoking related problems by my genetic makeup."

"I have smoked for so long and so much, what is the use in quitting now?"

"How did we survive back then?"

One post I should have done it on and didn't is the I'M DYING! thread. I may have to repost that one day with the quotes in place.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Apr 2004, 18:36 #25

Image Of all of the posts I popped up last night for a specific individual I feel as if this one is the most important and applicable to the person's situation.
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Pryde65 GOLD
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

18 Sep 2004, 07:49 #26

I am so grateful for finding this postingImage...it is exactly how I have been feeling tonight...like I am stuck in one huge craving. I began to worry about my first night out (tomorrow night) where my smoking friends would be there, and had been planning my own attack...drinking lots of water, staying proud of my progress, etc. but somewhere in my good intentions I got stuck in a huge crave right in the midst of plotting my attack. I know I have to face this first time out, I can't hide from it. Up until this point I had been feeling extremely strong. I need to keep that strength and confidence going.

Thank you keeping these older postings out there for us new quitters to browse through...this one really spoke to me today, and this gives me the confidence to keep searching when other triggers come up...my encouragement will be close at hand.

This is so very important to me. Image

P.S. I hope that by replying to this string, I'm not inadvertently bugging "all" members...I'm still new at this. I hope this is ok to do.

Sue

I have now stopped smoking for 4 days, 23 hours, 25 minutes, 27 seconds. That translates into 174 cigarettes NOT smoked, for a savings of $36.97! I have increased my life expectancy by 14 hours, 30 minutes, 48 seconds.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Nov 2004, 02:32 #27

In the beginning or a quit, just trying to think of something else is senseless advice. Your body may be in physical withdrawal and you are not going to think the physical urge away. In time though, when the thoughts for cigarettes are more from psychological triggers than from physical demands being made on the body, you can just think about something else. Just because you can though does not make it the optimal technique to use. This post explains the advantages of thinking of full-fledged smoking when the thought is triggered as opposed to trying to divert your smoking thoughts all together. The more you think about why you quit the more grateful you will always stay to the personal commitment you have made to never take another puff!

Joel
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Jan 2005, 20:16 #28

Bathing Fixations in Honest Light

Although a subconscious crave episode (triggered by encountering a time, place, event, emotion or activity during which you conditioned your mind to expect the arrival of a new supply of nicotine) will last less than three minutes, conscious thought fixation can last for as long as your ability to remain focused upon the thought.

In this insightful thread Joel invites you to use each each period of conscious fixation as a wonderful opportunity for honest reflection upon the underlying thought. Here are a few other Freedom threads inviting you to explore dependency rationalizations, minimizations or blame transference that if not addressed with honesty can infect a recovering mind.
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Joanne Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

15 Apr 2005, 23:11 #29


.........So what about thinking about something else? Well, it's hard to think of something else that can deliver such pleasure as this magic memory. Even if they successfully think of something else and overcome that urge, they walk away from the moment with a sense of longing or sadness with what they have just been deprived of again.

So, what is an ex-smoker to do? Change the tactic. Instead of trying (often unsuccessfully) of something else, acknowledge the desire. Don't tell yourself you don't want one, you do and you know it. But remember there is a catch. To take the one you have to have all the others with it. And with the others, you have to take all the problems that go with "them." The smell, the expense, the embarrassment, social ostracization, the total loss of control, and the health implications. The health effects are the most serious of the implications considering they lead to slowly being crippled then death.

This is what to focus on when the thought of one creeps into consciousness, the package deal of smoking. Think about the hundreds of cigarettes that have to go with that first one weekly. Think about the thousands that go with that first one every year, or the hundreds of thousands that will go with it until it kills you. These are not exaggerated numbers. Do the math yourself; calculate how much you smoked in your lifetime and figure out how many more will be consumed if you didn't quit.........
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

07 Jun 2005, 19:15 #30

Part of what Joel wrote reminded me of a visual graphic BillW had put in a help reply several years ago. This is prpbably an appropriate place to re-emphasize the point BillW and Joel have made with this part of the original "Think about something else" post.

"This is what to focus on when the thought of one creeps into consciousness, the package deal of smoking. Think about the hundreds of cigarettes that have to go with that first one weekly. Think about the thousands that go with that first one every year, or the hundreds of thousands that will go with it until it kills you. These are not exaggerated numbers. Do the math yourself; calculate how much you smoked in your lifetime and figure out how many more will be consumed if you didn't quit." - Joel from above.

Bill W adds a great visual - His version of the Tobacco / Nicotine Doomsday Clock - "...You can have that one, and then another one and then hundreds and thousands and then (should you live so long) millions. Leave your quit meter running, and just read it differently: "I have been readdicted for 5 years, 6 months, 27 days, having smoked 67,543 cigarettes, costing $12,543 dollars, and stealing 1 month 3 weeks of my hopelessly addicted life."
I've decided to sell them, ...I'm calling them DeathMeters." - BillW

Need 'Just One'? - When you're fixating remember to think about something else - Think about them ALL. It's a package deal.
Image= Image
My name is JoeJFree - 40 years a nicotine addict and gratefully now an X-smoker for 4 months, 27 days, 20 hours, 58 minutes and 37 seconds (147 days)
I've now reclaimed 20 Days and 12 Hours to live life as I choose!Image
NTAP!
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