Just one little puff?

John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Nov 2007, 11:14 #31

Cigarette Smoking Saturates Brain
{alpha}4beta2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors
Authors: Arthur L. Brody, MD, et al
Archives of Gen Psychiatry, August 2006; Volume 63, Number 8, Pages 907-914.
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Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

05 Jan 2008, 09:05 #32

Image Never take another puff. Words to live by.
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Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

26 Jan 2008, 09:21 #33

One equals All.
Image
Never take another puff.
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on 09 Jul 2009, 02:25, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Feb 2008, 19:07 #34

New Findings Show Additional Similarity Between Opiate and Nicotine Addiction
February 13, 2008
Description - New research published in the February 13 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience indicates that the effects of nicotine and opiates on the brain's reward system are equally strong in a key pleasure-sensing areas of the brain - the nucleus accumbens.
Newswise - "That was good!" "Do it again."
This is what the brain says when people use tobacco, as well as 'hard drugs' such as heroin. New research published in the February 13 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience indicates that the effects of nicotine and opiates on the brain's reward system are equally strong in a key pleasure-sensing areas of the brain - the nucleus accumbens.
"Testing rat brain tissue, we found remarkable overlap between the effects of nicotine and opiates on dopamine signaling within the brain's reward centers," says Daniel McGehee, Associate Professor in Anesthesia & Critical Care at the University of Chicago Medical Center.
McGehee and colleagues are exploring the control of dopamine, a key neurotransmitter in reward and addiction. Dopamine is released in areas such as the nucleus accumbens by naturally rewarding experiences such as food, sex, some drugs, and the neutral stimuli or 'cues' that become associated with them.
Nicotine and opiates are very different drugs, but the endpoint, with respect to the control of dopamine signaling, is almost identical. "There is a specific part of the nucleus accumbens where opiates have been shown to affect behavior, and when we tested nicotine in that area, the effects on dopamine are almost identical," says McGehee.
This research is important to scientists because it demonstrates overlap in the way the two drugs work, complementing previous studies that showed overlapping effects on physiology of the ventral tegmenal area, another key part of the brain's reward circuitry. The hope is that this study will help identify new methods for treating addiction - and not just for one drug type.
"It also demonstrates the seriousness of tobacco addiction, equating its grip on the individual to that of heroin. It reinforces the fact that these addictions are very physiological in nature and that breaking away from the habit is certainly more than just mind over matter," says McGehee.
This work is supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, T32GM07839 and F31DA023340 to JPB, DA015918 and DA019695 to DSM.
Keywords: ADDICTION, SMOKING, NICOTINE, OPIATES

© 2008 Newswise. All Rights Reserved.
Source: University of Chicago Medical Center
Last edited by John (Gold) on 09 Jul 2009, 02:26, edited 1 time in total.
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Sal GOLD.ffn
Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

30 Aug 2008, 22:54 #35

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Read the truth about the power of one puff of nicotine?
You're not battling a whole, carton, pack or cigarette but just one puff!
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on 09 Jul 2009, 02:28, edited 1 time in total.
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FreedomNicotine
Joined: 06 Dec 2008, 16:58

22 Oct 2009, 16:55 #37

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You are no different than any other drug addict, whether it be from alcohol, cocaine, heroin, etc.
You are an addict for life, but as long as you get the drug out of your system and never administer it again, you will never be set into the downward spiral that the drug sets into motion to its users.
In regards to smoking, that spiral is loss of your Freedom, your health and your life, which means you can lose everything.
To keep what you've got, always remember to stay smoke free you must never take another puff!
Joel
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Johnnie
Joined: 17 Aug 2010, 16:35

28 Aug 2010, 16:38 #38

Amen--and thank you. In a crave there are no other words needed. NTAP.
Gratefully Gold

I escaped from the prison of smoking on August 14, 2010.  
[font]The best revenge is quitting well![/font] 
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