Just one little puff?

UKMags1
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

10 Jul 2004, 02:19 #21

The One Puff Story
In March 1991, I had been smoking for 10 years. I was 29 years old and had 2 children; I'm ashamed to say that I had smoked through both pregnancies. My son was 2 and a half years old when he had a serious bout of pneumonia and as I stood outside the hospital smoking, 31 weeks pregnant with my daughter, and looked at all the other mums whose kids were also in hospital with chest problems, I realsised that there was a lesson which needed to be learnt. It took another year, but as 'National No Smoking' day came round in 1991 I took the plunge and quit. It was very hard but I did it. Each year that went by I quietly celebrated my life as a 'non-smoker'. As the years went by I couldn't imagine ever having been a smoker. My kids had no further chest complaints and in 1997 I had a 3rd child and it felt so good to have a really healthy pregnancy without worrying about smoking. My little boy was born and I never had to worry about smoking in the room or smelling of smoke. I was free, healthy and clean and I had reached the stage where I didn't give that health or freedom or smoking a thought!!!
Then guess what happened?????
In 2001 I started back to work after the birth of my son. I got a job in a supermarket and the people were very sociable and friendly. We socialised quite a bit both outside work and during our breaks at work and many of the women were smokers. One day, in the pub for a very quick drink after work, I was chatting about the fact that I had given up smoking so long agao and I decided to have a quick puff to see what it would taste like.
And that was where it started (or ended whichever way you choose to look at it).
It took only a couple of weeks of arrogantly thinking that I could have an occasional smoke before I was back up to 20 cigs a day! 10 years of healthy living and not smoking and clean teeth and clean house were down the pan. Not long before, I had read that 10 years after quitting is the point at which your chances of getting lung cancer drop to the same as a never-smoker almost. I had been thrilled at reading that and now it's all back to square one!
It took me almost 3 years before I could get up the courage to start a proper quit again. I had a few half-hearted attempts but they were all failures. This time I've got past 6 months and I am NEVER smoking again.
Take heed. This is a tale with a moral.
NEVER Take Another Puff.
Not only your health suffers.
I lost my self-esteem. My husband and his family were gutted because they had only known me as a non-smoker. Friends were disappointed. My young son was shocked because it was new for him & Mummy didn't smell good. I worried about his lungs even though I didn't smoke in the house. I worried about dying young and leaving the kids behind and on and on and on and on............
There's a simple answer.
Never Take Another Puff
Mags
190 days clean
£500+ saved
Almost 2300 cigs not smoked
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johnny L irish
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:57

16 Sep 2004, 03:21 #22

I enjoy Mag's take on this subject.

johnny
214 days quit
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FearNothingDK GOLD
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

22 Nov 2004, 02:04 #23

Image

Sandy - Free and Healing for Eight Months, Twenty Three Days, 11 Hours and 3 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 11 Days and 3 Hours, by avoiding the use of 3210 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $1,298.03.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Jan 2005, 01:39 #24

Image
"One is too many and one
thousand never enough!"
Last edited by John (Gold) on 09 Jul 2009, 02:15, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Mar 2005, 21:30 #25

Took me a few minutes to find where Bruce lifted the following quote from: "The consequence of not becoming fanatical against a puff is too serious to just dismiss. It will be the loss of your quit, and that can easily translate to loss of your health and eventually loss of your life. You have to be vigilant at all times, to keep reminding yourself that you are a recovering addict."
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Dec 2005, 23:24 #26

Image
Read the truth about the power of one puff of nicotine?
You're not battling a whole, carton, pack or cigarette but just one puff!
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CindyL 106
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:04

08 Feb 2006, 11:40 #27

Joe: Thanks for popping this one up to the top. The consequences of "just one puff" are predictable and devastating. I previously lost a 4 and 1/2 year quit because I thought that after all that time I could handle just one....and you know the rest of the story....within three weeks I was up to a pack a day again and it took me almost 2 more years of smoking before I started this quit.
The most important thing that I've learned here at Freedom, the thing I didn't know back then, the truth that will save my life Image is that in order to stay free from nicotine I can NEVER EVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF. Smoking is an addiction, not just a "nasty little habit", and no addict is strong enough for just one.

Knowledge is power ! NTAP, one day at a time, and stay free forever.

Cindy

And my super cool stats for today are.... I have been quit for 1 Month, 6 Days, 10 hours and 33 minutes. I have saved $140.39 by not smoking 935 disgusting cancer sticks. I have saved 3 Days, 5 hours and 55 minutes of my life to spend doing fun stuff.
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 Oct 2006, 23:18 #28

There is no such thing as 'Just one'

One = ALL

None = Freedom!
In order to stay free From nicotine
you need to stay free Of nicotine.
NTAP!
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

29 Dec 2006, 22:46 #29

As Joel suggests in his original article, we must change our thinking when it comes to addressing the reality of our chemical addiction to nicotine. Societal perception may be that tobacco smoking is a 'habit' to be 'picked up' or 'put down' at will. We all know that getting and more importantly staying free of nicotine is indeed that simple but by no means that easy. Anyone can 'pick up' and intake nicotine. It is quite obvious that not everyone can simply 'put it down' and leave it alone. As Joel defines so well above, we need to think differently than most of the society around us. We have learned from personal experience, many by repeat enlistments in the School of Unsuccessful Quits, that to reduce our chance of early death & enhance our ability to fully live in the best health possible we need to totally abstain from nicotine. Not because we have to remain free of nicotine but because we want to stay free.

From the original by Joel:
The consequence of not becoming fanatical against a puff is too serious to just dismiss. It will be the loss of your quit, and that can easily translate to loss of your health and eventually loss of your life. You have to be vigilant at all times, to keep reminding yourself that you are a recovering addict.

There may be no signs of the addiction; thoughts of cigarettes may have become rare events now and maybe even non-existent. But even at this stage of the game, there is a silent addiction still there that can take you down with full force for making one miscalculation; thinking that maybe you are different.
In order to stay free From nicotine
you need to stay free Of nicotine.
NTAP!
JoeJ Free, a nicotine addict & an ex-smoker who last administered nicotine 1 year, 11 months, 18 days, 23 hours, 27 minutes and 56 seconds Ago (717 days).
Not needed, wanted or missed 17949 deadly dose delivery devices, and retained $3,697.93.
Reclaimed 62 days, 7 hours and 47 minutes of precious remaining life time.Image
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hannah699
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:08

02 Sep 2007, 21:28 #30

Thanks for the reminder message. Just what I needed for this holiday weekend.
Can never be said enough.......

Sandy ......... 53 days of recovery ......
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