Just one little puff?

Teresa (Gold)
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:12

16 Feb 2002, 10:55 #11

Thank you a million times for the reinforcement. No matter how far along anyone is in their quit, it never hurts to remind any and all of us of the consequences.
Image Teresa
Loving my smober life at 6 months 1 day 3 hours 17 minutes
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Feb 2002, 02:19 #12

Image
"Just one little puff?" Hmmm...Maybe...?

Go back to full-fledged smoking until it cripples or kill you?
NO WAY!

It is much easier to squelch the desire when a drag on a cigarette is seen for what it is--a full-blown nicotine relapse! See a puff in its true light and your choice will always be to never take another puff!

Joel
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mirigirl (silver)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

07 Apr 2002, 10:00 #13

Image Not today thanks
yqs mirigirl
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Carolyn
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 20:33

27 Apr 2002, 05:11 #14

This thread reminded me of another one of Joel's articles, The Lucky Ones Get Hooked. I realize now that a year ago, I was one of the unlucky one's who lost a 11 month quit. I had a puff or 2, basically just to prove that I could, and thought that was it. A few weeks later I was offered a cigarette, and feeling smug that I could, indeed, have just one, I took it. That "just one" became just-one -pack- a-day.
That one puff was my relapse. There's no way I'll listen to that junkie again. There is no just one puff.
Carolyn
Choosing to be nicotine free for one week, six days, 6 hours, 22 minutes and 50 seconds. 265 cigarettes not smoked, saving $39.80. Life saved: 22 hours, 5 minutes.
Last edited by Carolyn on 22 Oct 2009, 17:07, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Jun 2002, 18:38 #15

Last night was my clinic panel night. The wealth of experience that can be found in one room at one time is overwhelming. We had the experiences of three people who were in the current clinic who had past quits that had exceeded ten year periods only to be lost by taking a puff.

One of the men was actually off 13 or 14 years, took a puff on a cigar and has smoked cigars daily ever since. That first cigar was taken sometime in the 1970's.

We had one panelist who had once quit with me back in 1983, a year later took a puff, and ended up smoking another seventeen years or so before coming to another clinic to quit--he has been off over a year now. He figured out how many cigarettes he had smoked during his short slip period, and it was over 120,000 cigarettes.

We had one man who was in my very first clinic from back in 1976 come in. I didn't know he was coming or I would have done the math of how many cigarettes he didn't smoke by quitting when he did--the number is now 563,940 cigarettes.

There was another man who had quit in a clinic back in 1987 and now had not smoked 267,900. The totals of cigarettes not smoked in that room last night was likely mind boggling--all because these people have remembered for years that they were addicts and could not take a puff.

The number of cigarettes that were smoked in that room because at one time or another the clinic members did forget or never really understood the fact that one puff was going to be their downfall was also equally mind boggling and a lot scarier if really considered. We all witnessed great successes and great past failures, all hinged on the acceptance or the disblief in the fact that to stay smoke free you must always know to never take another puff!

Joel
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Aug 2002, 20:17 #16

One of Canada's new cigarette warning labels (below) goes further than any government warning label in history in attempting to teach Canada's children the true power of nicotine. There are no such warnings in most of the rest of the world, where children are taught that smoking is just a "nasty little habit" like picking your nose. As for us and potential relapse, a recent study suggested that nicotine smokers only need one puff - that very first puff - in order to elevate dopamine output almost to its maximum potential. Like topping off a gas tank, the rest of the puffs of nicotine appear to be for reserves for later.

It's highly likely that few if any of us will require a second puff in order to set relapse in motion. Try thinking of it like you'd be giving a recovered alcoholic one drink but not enough to get them drunk. The damage is done. Triggers have been re-established that must be visited again, the brain has chemically tasted the fruit of the poisonous tree, and a sea of old dependency memories have been awaken, revived and are floating on the surface. Look around you and watch others as they are forced to feed a mandatory chemical need. Nicotine's power is real!


Image
Last edited by John (Gold) on 09 Jul 2009, 02:07, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Jan 2004, 19:47 #17

Last edited by John (Gold) on 09 Jul 2009, 02:14, edited 1 time in total.
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cathywoohoo
Joined: 12 Jan 2009, 21:56

18 Mar 2004, 23:36 #18

I'm a newbie, so not really sure what I'm doing....

Just reading this made me want to put in my two cents worth.

When I was 28, a heart attack forced me to quit smoking. I had remained quit for 4 years, with the fear of another heart attack looming if I ever took another puff. Unfortunately, one day, during a very bad/stressful/postpartum depression/self-destructive time in my life, I ended up stopping at the store and buying a pack of cigarettes..convincing myself that since I had quit for 4 years, that one pack wasn't gonna hurt me. That I wasn't addicted anymore since it had been so long. Well, that one pack of smokes seems to have lasted 18 months. What had kept me quit for so long was the threat of a repeat heart attack...I had myself convinced that if I ever took another puff, the pain in my chest would start again...well, it didn't...I find it absolutely amazing how one's mind can forget fears in order to feed an addiction.

I'm into my second quit now, and this one will last forever.

cathy
One week, three days, 16 hours, 37 minutes and 49 seconds. 267 cigarettes not smoked, saving $96.23. Life saved: 22 hours, 15 minutes.
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

02 Jun 2004, 07:42 #19

Lighting a cigarette or putting a cigarette in your mouth will cause the absorbtion of nicotine and that absorbtion is administration of nicotine to your body and administration of nicotine is a relapse.
Trying to rationalize it or define it as anything else is going to kill a quit and killing a quit can very likely end up in killing the quitter. The only way to guarantee staying totally smoke free is to know that they only way to avoid relapsing is to never administer nicotine via any NRT route and as far as for burning tobacco the only way to avoid relapsing is to never take another puff!

Joel
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johnny L irish
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:57

09 Jul 2004, 03:31 #20


Thanks Joel -

Frankly, this sort of reinforcement -- self-directed and with absolute honesty -- has saved me from some embarressing admission lately. As you say, I am no different than any other addict out there, NO DIFFERENT. That's the point. It's essential to keeping the quit. I've been reminding myself over and over, "One puff is unacceptable. One puff is unacceptable." It's gotten me through some rocky times. I'm still clean, and try to wake up each morning and be grateful for the opportunity to continue staying that way.

Johnny

145 days as the Image

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