Is Relapse a Natural Part of the Addiction Process?

Is Relapse a Natural Part of the Addiction Process?

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Mar 2001, 20:15 #1

Most other boards, and in fact most professional programs and nicotine addiction experts see relapsing as a normal part of the addiction process. In a way we are out on a limb here at Freedom and Turkeyville. We don't accept relapse as a normal process of addiction. We see a relapse as a natural process of not understanding and/or accepting ones own addiction. For if the true implication of a relapse is understood, any sane and recovering addict would choose not to relapse.

Every recovering nicotine addict here has the tools in place not to relapse, which is why he or she is a recovering addict now and not an active user. He or she understands full well, up to this point in time that he or she could not control quantity of cigarettes or duration of the relapse. If nicotine is readministered, the relapse will take on a life of its own, and has the full potential of taking your life in the process.

If you keep that understanding and keep in practice our one simple principle, a relapse is not going to be a natural occurrence and in fact, a relapse is going to be an impossibility. For as long as you follow one simple principal, you will never be able to go back to smoking. The principle, is just remembering if you want to keep control of your addiction never take another puff!

Edited 11-29-11 to include new video version:

Last edited by Joel on 11 Apr 2016, 23:25, edited 2 times in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Mar 2001, 20:22 #2

Don't ever get the impression that relapsing is a normal part of quitting. Relapsing is only normal for people who don't understand addiction or don't believe they themselves are addicts. But everyone who has spend a few minutes reading here at Freedom is a nicotine addict. If not, you would never have found us in the first place or you would have written us off as being off the wall when reading your first few post or our welcome pages.

Once you joined up you were making an acknowledgement of your state of being at that time, and addicted smoker. That state is never going to leave. Once an addict, you will always be an addict. But over time, it will become an asymptomatic addiction, hence, no visible signs, no real need. But your body is permanently altered and if you ever let your guard down for a second a relapse is going to be a reality. Nobody knows if they are going to have another quit in them. But as long as you follow one simple lesson here, you will never have to worry about another quit. That rule is to stay smoke free and reap the health and lifesaving benefits that go with being smoke free you must never take another puff!

Joel
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NYPam(GREEN)
Joined: 12 Jan 2009, 22:11

13 Mar 2001, 09:43 #3

 Image

Joel, When I start thinking "junkie thoughts" I realize how close to the edge I am getting.... I look for a safety net... and I hear my mind scream...
Never take another Puff!!
It has worked for me so far!

pam
Two months, one week, three days, 13 hours, 28 minutes and 45 seconds. 1739 cigarettes not smoked, saving $395.63. Life saved: 6 days, 55 minutes.
Last edited by NYPam(GREEN) on 18 May 2010, 16:19, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 Mar 2001, 21:50 #4

Those selling nicotine need relapse in order to stay in the nicotine business.
I've given enough already! I refuse to give any more Image Knowing that the nicotine receptors in my mind have been permanently altered and that I'll always be just one puff away from returning to a heavy 3 pack a day smoker (or maybe more), doesn't make the complete comfort and total calmness that I've felt for the past 20 months any less comfortable or or any less calming. The truth doesn't hurt, it empowers.
Image
Last edited by John (Gold) on 18 May 2010, 16:20, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 Apr 2001, 21:36 #5

I see Zep brought this up yesterday (thanks Zep) but I think it is an important one to bring up today. No one should ever see relapse as an inevitability. It is only going to happen to an individual who loses sight of the fact that they are nicotine addicts. They were the day they quit, they still are today, they will be nicotine addicts for the rest of their lives. The addiction will become asymptomatic, almost may seem like it is no longer there. But it is, and if ever given the opportunity it will take you down tobacco road again with all the horror and tragedies that go with being a smoker. To stay on the road to Freedom instead your must prevent relapse and the devastations that go with it. To do this you must always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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gonecold (Silver)
Joined: 10 Jan 2009, 00:00

27 Apr 2001, 01:03 #6

In my mind I still think I will relaspe. I am only 3 weeks into my quit.
I cannot afford to look down the road to next week , next month or next year.
I'm only looking at today, and trying to stay true to myself, to Never Take Another Puff.
One day at a time.
Hopefully with enough "one days, it will get easier.
I consider it a major victory when I have gone through the day without , caving in to the NicoDemon.

This site has been a great help, thanks to all who have shared their own experiences.


Jon
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

27 Apr 2001, 01:25 #7

Dear Jon,

If you tell yourself you will relapse....then you will! Please tell yourself that you WON'T relapse and you won't.

Keep reading and remember that attitude and determination play a huge role in a quit. Information about your addiction....and in fact learning that you are indeed an addict, should keep you from ever taking another puff and that one puff is the only difference between success and failure. It could also be the difference between life and death.

keep up the great job...and just take it one day at a time.

yqs,
Image
Linda
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mals
Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:13

27 Apr 2001, 02:52 #8

If I look back (it's only been three weeks since I quit)to my smoking days - they seem very far away. Sometimes it seems like quitting wasn't that hard at all. If I take another puff then I cld always quit again. Right??? WRONG!!! Those were terrible days. Writhing pain, nauseous mornings and horrible crying spells. I do not crave a cigarette at all - the only thing that remains is the illusion of fun. It is but an illusion. A mirage.

Can I really afford to fall prey to that again? Yes I can.

It feels good to keep moving on and adding the days since I quit. Like someone pointed out - it is a challenge - a challenge worth loving and living for. Feels great to have accomplished something great. A relapse wouldn't hurt anyone but ME.
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S Sweet
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

12 May 2001, 00:59 #9

for a friend that i know is reading
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

03 Jul 2001, 08:51 #10

Image With many medical professionals scanning our site I thought this would be one of particular value to emphasize. Relapse is a state that should be avoided at all costs. Messages like "don't let a slip put you back to smoking" is all but assuring that recovering addicts are going to think that "slipping" is acceptable. A slip is a relapse and a relapse hold potentially deadly consequences. So don't give the message of not to let a slip put you back to smoking, rather deliver the message that to stay free from smoking, don't slip. In other words to stay free always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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