Is Relapse a Natural Part of the Addiction Process?

Rickgoldx5
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

21 Mar 2003, 22:46 #31

ImageThe last paragraph of Joels post #63 says it all for me.
Rick
"Smoking is unnatural, and relapsing around a holiday too. Relapsing is an unnatural act that will never happen as long as you always remember that you were born a non-smoker with the inherent knowledge that inhaling smoke is bad for your survival, and can be that way again and stay that way again as long as you always know to never take another puff!"
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madisonsmom(DBLGREEN)
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 23:23

21 Mar 2003, 22:55 #32

I also like #63 because it reminds me of something that I did about a month ago. I was outside on my front porch smoking and I put the smoke out in a flower pot that had not been watered in months. About an hour later I was inside and walking upstairs and smelled something burning - couldn't figure out what it was. I stuck my head outside to see if a neighbor was burning leaves and saw smoke coming up from the flower pot.

That really got to me - what if that had happened before I went to bed - I could have killed myself and my whole family. So I put out the smoldering pot with some water and promptly lit another cigarette to calm my nerves.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 May 2003, 20:55 #33

I wrote the text below over a year ago on an earlier post on this string. I think it is an important supplement to this post:

One of our newer members wrote about us all being human and almost inferred there can be slips. He is right on one count--we are all human--and one of the things that go with being human is that we are mortal. That is the concept that every ex-smoker had better hang on to, our mortality.

A RELAPSE is not a slip. A slip though is a RELAPSE! A relapse is a loss of a quit. It means a person either has to "try" to quit again or go back to smoking until it cripples or kills them. These are both lousy options but one is sure a whole lot worse than the other.

Again, our message here at Freedom is now, has always been, and always will be--DON'T RELAPSE! You must throw certain words or concepts out of your vocabulary when it comes to addiction. Just, only, puff, accident, sneak, boo-boo, lapse of judgment, mistake, blunder, slip or any other similar meaning word trivializes the real issue here--you are a drug addict and readministering nicotine is a DRUG RELAPSE!

Relapses will only occur if you minimize the implication of relapse. Stay focused on the ONLY way to succeed at being nicotine free is to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

24 Dec 2003, 21:38 #34

For people who think it is "natural" to relapse around the holidays. "Common," maybe but "natural," not by a long shot. The only way to naturally relapse is by administering nicotine via nicotine water, gum, patch, inhaler, lozenge, or any other product that some enterprising company comes up with, as well as by using any non-burning tobacco product, and by forgetting that for burning tobacco products that the only way to stay smoke and nicotine free is to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Feb 2005, 20:49 #35

Never get the impression that relapsing is a normal part of quitting. Relapsing is only normal for people who don't understand addiction or don't believe they themselves are addicts. But everyone who has spend a few minutes reading here at Freedom is a nicotine addict. If not, you would never have found us in the first place or you would have written us off as being off the wall when reading your first few post or our welcome pages.

Once you joined up you were making an acknowledgement of your state of being at that time, and addicted smoker. That state is never going to leave. Once an addict, you will always be an addict. But over time, it will become an asymptomatic addiction, hence, no visible signs, no real need. But your body is permanently altered and if you ever let your guard down for a second a relapse is going to be a reality. Nobody knows if they are going to have another quit in them. But as long as you follow one simple lesson here, you will never have to worry about another quit. That rule is to stay smoke free and reap the health and lifesaving benefits that go with being smoke free you must never take another puff!

Joel
Last edited by Joel on 05 Apr 2011, 22:34, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

20 Mar 2005, 20:18 #36

No member here should ever get the impression that relapsing is a normal part of quitting. Relapsing is only normal for people who don't understand addiction or don't believe they themselves are addicts. But everyone who has spend a few minutes reading here at Freedom is a nicotine addict. If not, they would never have found us in the first place or they would have written us off as being off the wall when reading our requirements for joining.

Once you joined up you were making an acknowledgement of your state of being at that time, an addicted smoker. That state is never going to leave. Once an addict, you will always be an addict. But over time, it will become an asymptomatic addiction, hence, no visible signs, no real need. But your body is permanently altered and if you ever let your guard down for a second a relapse is going to be a reality. Nobody knows if they are going to have another quit in them. But as long as you follow one simple lesson here, you will never have to worry about another quit. That rule is to stay smoke free and reap the health and lifesaving benefits that go with being smoke free you must never take another puff!

Joel
Last edited by Joel on 05 Apr 2011, 22:35, edited 1 time in total.
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auntvaleria
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:01

10 May 2006, 10:55 #37

I spoke to an acquaintence yesterday; she had quit smoking around the time I did; but she told me yesterday that she relapsed....but it was so matter of fact:

Good morning
How was your weekend?
By the way, I relapsed.
Oh well,
Couldn't believe that I did it.
I'll just have to quit again.
Someday. I'll set another date.

I was sad for her, but I think she wanted sympathy from me. But I had none.

One day at a time and Never Take Another Puff!

Imageaunt valeria
I have been quit for 2 Months, 2 Weeks, 2 hours, 25 minutes and 34 seconds (75 days). I have saved $206.52 by not smoking 1,502 cigarettes. I have saved 5 Days, 5 hours and 10 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 2/23/2006 7:30 PM
Last edited by auntvaleria on 18 May 2010, 16:37, edited 1 time in total.
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Sharry
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 Dec 2006, 01:28 #38

Hello Joel

I did know I was a nicotine addict but, have only in the last few days here, understood addiction properly.

I always thought, OK I can have a puff here or there - not realising I was prolonging the agony.

Knowledge is so powerful.

Sharry.
I have been quit for 1 Week, 5 Days, 10 hours, 34 minutes and 15 seconds (12 days). I have saved £37.31 by not smoking 186 cigarettes. I have saved 15 hours and 30 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 04/12/2006 07:54
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jakki8368
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Oct 2007, 02:04 #39

Truely understanding adiction to nicotine has shown us all that if we relapse we will go back to smoking all and some of our origional habbit.

and then we would want to stop again because we know the damage we are doing.

so then we would stop - no way to constantly withdrawing from nicotine again!!!!!

Joel you have taught me well - i know i will never take another puff!

thank you

jakki

I have been quit for 1 Month, 19 hours, 48 minutes and 7 seconds (30 days). I have saved £231.18 by not smoking 924 cigarettes. I have saved 3 Days and 5 hours of my life. My Quit Date: 09/09/2007 23:15
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JohnPolito
Joined: 11 Nov 2008, 19:22

06 Apr 2011, 01:29 #40

Contrary to the lessons here at Freedom, conventional wisdom at most other websites teaches visiting quitters/smokers that "smoking is a chronic relapsing disorder." But need it be?  We know that half of adult smokers are losing 13 (male) to 14 (female) years of life expectancy.  What the below study reports is that the percentage of all smokers who who are able at some point in their life to arrest their dependency, what this paper calls remission.  It found that figure to be 83.7%.  Contrary to conventional wisdom, 100% of us can break free and 100% stay free so long as all nicotine remains on the outside. Image John



Probability and predictors of remission from life-time nicotine, alcohol, cannabis or cocaine dependence: results from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

Addiction. 2010 Nov 16. doi: 10.1111/j.1360-0443.2010.03194.x. [Epub ahead of print]

Lopez-Quintero C, Hasin DS, De Los Cobos JP, Pines A, Wang S, Grant BF, Blanco C.

Abstract

Aim:  To estimate the general and racial/ethnic specific cumulative probability of remission from nicotine alcohol cannabis or cocaine dependence, and to identify predictors of remission across substances.

Design:  Data were collected from structured diagnostic interviews using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-DSM-IV version. Setting  The 2001-2002 National Epidemiological Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) surveyed a nationally representative sample from US adults (n = 43,093) selected in a three-stage sampling design.

Participants: The subsamples of individuals with life-time DSM-IV diagnosis of dependence on nicotine (n = 6,937), alcohol (n = 4,781), cannabis (n = 530) and cocaine (n = 408).

Measurements:  Cumulative probability estimates of dependence remission for the general population and across racial/ethnic groups. Hazard ratios for remission from dependence.

Findings:  Life-time cumulative probability estimates of dependence remission were 83.7% for nicotine, 90.6% for alcohol, 97.2% for cannabis and 99.2% for cocaine. Half of the cases of nicotine, alcohol, cannabis and cocaine dependence remitted approximately 26, 14, 6 and 5 years after dependence onset, respectively. Males, Blacks and individuals with diagnosis of personality disorders and history of substance use comorbidity exhibited lower hazards of remission for at least two substances.

Conclusions:  A significant proportion of individuals with dependence on nicotine, alcohol, cannabis or cocaine achieve remission at some point in their life-time, although the probability and time to remission varies by substance and racial/ethnic group. Several predictors of remission are shared by at least two substances, suggesting that the processes of remission overlap. The lower rates of remission of individuals with comorbid personality or substance use disorders highlight the need for providing coordinated psychiatric and substance abuse interventions.
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1 ... x/abstract

Other interesting findings quoted from the full-text of this study:
  • The cumulative probability estimates of dependence remission within the first year of dependence onset were 3.0% for nicotine and alcohol, 4.7% for cannabis and 8.6% for cocaine.
  • The cumulative probability of remission a decade after onset of dependence was 18.4% for nicotine, 37.4% for alcohol, 66.2% for cannabis and 75.8% for cocaine.
  • Life-time cumulative probability estimates of dependence remission were 83.7% for nicotine, 90.6% for alcohol, 97.2% for cannabis and 99.2% for cocaine.
  • Half the cases of nicotine, alcohol, cannabis and cocaine dependence remitted approximately 26, 14, 6 and 5 years after dependence onset, respectively.
  • The differences in the rate of remission across substances may be explained, at least in part, by the speed at which physical, psychological and social adverse consequences manifest after the onset of dependence.
  • Among individuals with nicotine dependence, 81.6% of Whites, 89.7% of Blacks, 61.9% of Hispanics, 57.7% of Native Hawaiians or other Pacific Islanders and 38.9% of American Indians or Alaskan Natives remitted at some time in their life-time (log-rank test = 23.7, P < 0.01).
  • Half of nicotine dependence remissions occurred approximately 24 years after onset of dependence among Whites, 35 years among Blacks, 16 years among Hispanics, 8 years among Native Hawaiians or other Pacific Islanders and 13 years among American Indians or Alaskan Natives.
  • According to the adjusted models (Table 4), a diagnosis of nicotine dependence increased the likelihood of remission from cocaine dependence.
  • A previous diagnosis of alcohol dependence decreased the probability of remission from nicotine or cannabis dependence.
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