Is it true that everything smells and tastes better when you quit smoking?

Joel
Joel

9:25 AM - Nov 20, 2002 #1

Is it true that everything smells and tastes better when you quit smoking? Nope. Everything smells and tastes more accurate when you quit smoking. More accurate does not necessarily mean better. When your first spring time rolls around after you quit smoking you will likely smell the aromas of flowers that smell much more intense and also likely much more pleasant than you perceived while you were still smoking. You will likely say that these aromas do smell much better.



But drive by a garbage dump or a sewage treatment plant now and see how much better it smells since you quit smoking. The odds are it will not smell better but may in fact smell much worse and more pungent than before.

The same principle applies to tastes. You may find that you start to perceive new flavors in foods. You may find that certain vegetables in a salad actually have a flavor while for the years you smoked you may have thought they were only added to give the salad a crunch. This does not automatically mean you will like the flavor.



You may find that you were spicing foods a lot more when you were a smoker too just so you could taste them. If you prepare the foods with the same amount of spicing as you did while smoking you may find that it is way over spiced for your new found taste buds.



So while not everything is going to smell and taste better--things are going to smell and taste more accurate. While not all things will smell better, one thing you should know for sure is that you are going to smell a whole lot better to the rest of the non-smoking world as long as you always remember to never take another puff!



Joel


Last edited by Joel on 5:54 PM - Aug 16, 2012, edited 4 times in total.
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richard This is It GOLD
richard This is It GOLD

9:50 AM - Nov 20, 2002 #2

I'm thinking Joel you brought this up in response to Birky's post:
http://sc.communities.msn.../pby/img/mb/reply_bg.gif noWrap align=middle>
From: Birky Sent: 11/19/2002 4:54 PM
Marie, I'm a newbie, but already thinking there may be an alternative. No such Luck. But since you mentioned red wine..... since I am in withdrawal..4days and 11hrs... did you ever lose your taste for wine. It tastes horrible to me right now. Is this also part of the picture or am I afraid of associating alcohol with nicotine?
Well, you know what, I think I'm just going to have to agree with you Joel - - ha - little change there !!!

So, Birky... to expand on Joel's words....... Red Wine tastes "more accurate" - In my own expereince, good red wine tastes very much better, bad red wine tastes, well, like bad red wine. I'm using my "money saved from Nicotine" to buy "better red wine" - the glass is also very very important (but now I'm risking the dreaded "diversions" thread

Please also read carefully the "Alcohol and quitting " threads..... these are triggers you'll need to conquer - but once conquered, alcohol need never be a risk to your quit. ((I think I might be walking proof of this...... )).... but, but BUT - I know for a fact there are several EX members of Freedom who were NOT well enough prepared to tackle the alcohol triggers....

richard
Last edited by richard This is It GOLD on 12:19 AM - Oct 19, 2009, edited 2 times in total.
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Joel
Joel

10:04 AM - Nov 20, 2002 #3

Good call Richard. I did in fact write this in response to that post. I actually thought that I had written something to this effect before but couldn't find it so just typed out a new post on the topic. It is a concept I talk about in all of my clinics when doing my weight control evening. I also brought up the alcohol thread as a general warning of the problems that can go along if alcohol consumption is ever increased after smoking cessation.
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Jordan(Silver)
Jordan(Silver)

1:48 AM - Dec 18, 2002 #4

Hi Joel,

Since I saw this thread brought back up, I was thinking about
how my tastes have changed since I quit smoking. I had been drinking a certain diet soda with lemon flavoring added for almost of of the year. I had a 16 oz bottle of it almost everyday. I liked it. Tasted fine to me.

Well after I was quit for awhile, those sodas started tasteing kinda "yucky". The lemon flavor in the soda tasted artificial and gross. I stopped drinking that brand and switched to another diet soda that I thought tasted better. My non- smoking daughter told me that my old soda brand had always tasted bad to her, and that she had often wondered why I drank it! LOL.

The other thing I've noticed is that I am not salting my food as heavily as I used to. A little salt tastes "saltier" to me.

My smoking had covered up and made me insensitive to a lot of tastes and smells. Now I think that I more truly "taste" and that I more truly "smell". And that's a good thing!

Sincerely,
Gena(bronze)
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hoop0826(gold)
hoop0826(gold)

2:37 PM - Dec 18, 2002 #5

I just wanted to say that I went to do laundry today, and I noticed that none of my shirts really smelled "bad " I mean, the bad that they used to always smell and signal a time for the wash. I old cigarette smoke residue bad that smelled so horrible at first, then after a while have come to accept. It is so nice to not have to deal with that anymore!
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BirkyGOLD
BirkyGOLD

10:16 PM - Dec 18, 2002 #6

Good Morning After reading through this thread, I'm here to tell you that wine is tasting better now, but maybe too good..where is the thread on increased alcohol consumption? As far as things smelling clearer or more accurate, you are so very right! In the past, as a young teenager, I hated smoke smell, and with a smoking mother in the house, everything smelled. I always kept my room door closed and literally, once a month would scrub my walls. Diesel was another bad smell, to the point of nauseousness. That bad smell is back stronger than ever. I cannot even drive near a truck without gagging. I believe I started smoking to be cool, but maybe also I noticed bad smells were minimized. Any comments to help get through these "bad smells". Birky 1month +
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Joel
Joel

10:29 PM - Dec 18, 2002 #7

Birky, make sure to read the last post I put up in that string: Crutches to Quit Smoking
Last edited by Joel on 12:20 AM - Oct 19, 2009, edited 2 times in total.
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Joel
Joel

12:40 AM - Jan 14, 2003 #8

In honor of today's parade I thought I would bring this one up. While I cannot guarantee that if a person relapses he or she will get cancer, heart disease, a stroke, a variety of lung diseases, more frequent infections, or a host of other problems caused by smoking, I can guarantee that if a person relapses he or she is going to smell like a smoker again. To avoid ever smelling like a smoker always remember now to never take another puff!

Joel
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Sambam
Sambam

2:00 AM - Jan 14, 2003 #9

I have to agree. The second week into my quit everything tasted absoutely awful, even my favourite beer (thats far too harsh!). But have to fully agree with what you have said. On day 5 I left the house and felt almost sick from the fumes of the traffic, I really did not realise how powerful sense of smell can be. I am now glad that my taste buds have settled and can appreciate things a great deal more than I previously could.

Sam

3w 5d 5 h. Saved: £118, cant be bad!
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madisonsmom(DBLGREEN)
madisonsmom(DBLGREEN)

4:02 AM - Mar 20, 2003 #10

Yep - my husband sitll smokes and came inside last night after smoking his after dinner cig. YUCK! He really reeked and you just don't realize it until you quit. You know you stink, but you just don't know how bad it is!
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Joel
Joel

7:19 PM - Mar 27, 2003 #11

I see a few of our members are becoming quite aware of the stench that goes along with being a smoker. To avoid ever having to smell like that again always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Jery9282
Jery9282

3:35 AM - Dec 21, 2003 #12

One of the reasons (A marjor one for me) I quit was to stop stinking like overfilled ashtrays. My skin, hair, clothes, car and house all smelled like heavy smoking had been going on, because it had been.Oh, I forgot to list my breath must have been terrible. I used alot of Scope and mints to try hiding it. And, I knew all along that they didn't help.

Now I am wanting to be around smokers to remind me how bad it is. But since I have quit for over a month, I don't know smokers and don't even see many. At the country club, the men's grill smells like smoke and I find it hard to breathe in that room.

I now smell, look and taste good according to my wife and I do believe her. Thanks for this post. jery
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Hillbilly(Gold)
Hillbilly(Gold)

3:42 AM - Dec 21, 2003 #13

Last edited by Hillbilly(Gold) on 12:20 AM - Oct 19, 2009, edited 2 times in total.
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GreenSolveg
GreenSolveg

10:40 PM - Jan 19, 2004 #14

I started noticing how bad smokers smelled about 6 months before I quit; this was one of my motivations to stop.

On the first day of school (day 17) I was sitting at a desk FAR from the door a few minutes before the class started. Suddenly my nostrils filled with that smell. I turned around; my old smoking buddy had just walked in the door.
It shames me to think that I was that pungent, for that long.

--Erica
And I've been buying jasmine oil and dried papay and things lately because it's so much fun to enjoy the full power of my senses.
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Mocha
Mocha

12:15 AM - Aug 06, 2004 #15

It's almost like we've been living in a Matrix all along
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K loMN1
K loMN1

1:22 AM - Aug 28, 2004 #16

I used to light candles in every room of the house. It seemed like I could never smell them unless I had tons of them goimg. Funny thing. Last night laying in bed, I could smell the one next to the bed. It was not even lit.

Kellie

1week + 1day
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j a g 64
j a g 64

12:41 AM - Sep 17, 2004 #17

when I was in my 20's my friends used to say "Janet can smell boiling water" and in a way it's true because the heated metal of the pan has a smell. I started noticing changes in my early 30's. By last year I was starting to say "what smell?" a lot. Yesterday I was so startled at the intensity of some of the things that I smelled that i thought it was all coming from me! It took a while to figure out what was happening.

JAG

9 days, 11 hrs.
Unbelieveable.
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kwhtlw
kwhtlw

12:59 AM - Sep 17, 2004 #18

OH....Now I get it!!! This explains why my wife smells so much worse now after she smokes than she smelled before I quit tobacco. I would have never guessed!! Thanks Joel

Kevin
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Deborah21703
Deborah21703

1:15 PM - Oct 28, 2004 #19

Even before I quit smoking, my sense of smell was better than that of most other people I know. Now that I have quit, the smells of the world around me are to the point of being almost overwhelming. Very distracting, for the most part too intense to be enjoyable... Downright nauseating on a regular basis...

To a lesser extent, I am noticing this with the taste of things, also. That the taste of things is too intense to be enjoyable...

Mostly it's smells that are bothering me. Is this something that I will probably eventually get used to? Any suggestions on how to make it more tolerable in the mean time? I feel like I am being bombarded with smells... Assaulted by them...

I know it is absurd to be thinking about how the smells and tastes would be more manageable if I went back to smoking. Absurd, yes, but then, my junky thinking always is... That does seem like a new level of absurdity for me, though, to be telling myself that I should start smoking again so that I wouldn't be overwhelmed by the smells and tastes of things.

I would rather be overwhelmed by the smells around me than overwhelmed by being the slave to my addiction. But if there were ways to deal with the overpowering smells and tastes, I'd sure like to know!

Thanks...

Deborah

Quit for 1 month, 1 week, and 2 days
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Joel
Joel

7:23 PM - Apr 28, 2005 #20

I see some of our members are starting to recognize the benefit of the more accurate sense of smell in their first springtimes as ex-smokers.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

7:13 AM - Mar 20, 2006 #21

Everything smells the same after we quit. It is the recovery of our senses (pun intended) that gives us the full realization of what we have been unable to detect while we laid coating after coating of tobacco slime over our nasal passages and mouths. The natural world holds many wonders for all who choose to live nicotine free, naturally, by never taking a puff.

JoeJFree - from tobacco & nicotine for One Year, Two Months, Nine Days, 7 Hours and 55 Minutes, (433 days)
Not consumed 10833, and saved $2,189.16.
Reclaimed 37 days, 14 hours and 46 minutes to use as I Choose!
NTAP!
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smilinheart
smilinheart

1:16 AM - Apr 19, 2006 #22

Everything does smell and taste better. Every scent I smell, every nibble I taste -- the flavors from smell and taste are intensified.

I even smell things before 'non smokers'...and I can identify the scent I'm smelling. Maybe they are so used to scents that they don't really smell them (kind of like stopping to smell the flowers). I can even be upstairs when my significant other is in the kitchen and I can smell him chopping cilantro or cutting onions/garlic. I can smell coffee from afar when it first begins to perk.

It is kind of comical, there aren't many things that I pick up into my hands that I don't put to my nose to smell---

Ahhhh...how wonderful to walk through life and have the ability to smell all the wonderful scents before us.
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Joel
Joel

7:18 PM - Jun 15, 2006 #23

The question was posed of whether or not an individual will ever get to the point that he or she will will not like the smell of cigarette smoke. There is real variation in this effect with ex-smokers.

Most will get to the point that they really don't like the smell of cigarette smoke. Some get there in a matter of days after quitting.

There are some people who seem to like the smell for the rest of their lives. They truly are the minority though.

There is one other interesting group. People who quit and still like the smell of smoke for quite a long time period--sometimes for years in fact. Then one day out of the blue, the person gets a direct whiff of smoke and it almost makes the person sick. The individual often goes on to despising the smell of smoke for the rest of his or her life.

I don't know what causes the sudden shift in senses, but I have seen this phenomena happen to quite a few people over the years.

Whether an individual likes the smell of smoke or not, he or she should know that by quitting that the vast majority of people that he or she encounters will like his or her smell more as long as he or she continues to stick to his or her personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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Mitzi499
Mitzi499

8:32 PM - Jun 15, 2006 #24

It also helps to know that the tobacco industry add certain things to cigarettes to make them smell good. For a while I thought there must be something wrong in my head that I still appreciated the smell of a newly lit cigarette. Perhaps I always will. I have, after all, known a few never smokers who tell me they enjoy that smell also.

But I don't think there is anyone, smoker, ex smoker or never smoker who can honestly say they like the smell of an overflowing ashtray or the smell of stale smoke on clothing, in the car, in the house etc.

As long as we never take another puff, enjoying that smell occasionally will do little harm. Hopefully it is becoming an increasingly rare experience in any case as the world becomes increasingly tobacco free.

Maria - 57 days after 38 years
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Joel
Joel

8:34 PM - Jun 15, 2006 #25

Earlier today I popped up the thread Cigarette Smoke Smell Good? It's not by accident.  addressing this issue.
Last edited by Joel on 3:50 AM - Feb 22, 2015, edited 2 times in total.
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