Is it true that everything smells and tastes better when you quit smoking?

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Mar 2003, 19:19 #11

I see a few of our members are becoming quite aware of the stench that goes along with being a smoker. To avoid ever having to smell like that again always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 01:47

21 Dec 2003, 03:35 #12

One of the reasons (A marjor one for me) I quit was to stop stinking like overfilled ashtrays. My skin, hair, clothes, car and house all smelled like heavy smoking had been going on, because it had been.Oh, I forgot to list my breath must have been terrible. I used alot of Scope and mints to try hiding it. And, I knew all along that they didn't help.

Now I am wanting to be around smokers to remind me how bad it is. But since I have quit for over a month, I don't know smokers and don't even see many. At the country club, the men's grill smells like smoke and I find it hard to breathe in that room.

I now smell, look and taste good according to my wife and I do believe her. Thanks for this post. jery
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

21 Dec 2003, 03:42 #13

Last edited by Hillbilly(Gold) on 19 Oct 2009, 00:20, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

19 Jan 2004, 22:40 #14

I started noticing how bad smokers smelled about 6 months before I quit; this was one of my motivations to stop.

On the first day of school (day 17) I was sitting at a desk FAR from the door a few minutes before the class started. Suddenly my nostrils filled with that smell. I turned around; my old smoking buddy had just walked in the door.
It shames me to think that I was that pungent, for that long.

--Erica
And I've been buying jasmine oil and dried papay and things lately because it's so much fun to enjoy the full power of my senses.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

06 Aug 2004, 00:15 #15

It's almost like we've been living in a Matrix all along
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Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 23:23

28 Aug 2004, 01:22 #16

I used to light candles in every room of the house. It seemed like I could never smell them unless I had tons of them goimg. Funny thing. Last night laying in bed, I could smell the one next to the bed. It was not even lit.

Kellie

1week + 1day
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

17 Sep 2004, 00:41 #17

when I was in my 20's my friends used to say "Janet can smell boiling water" and in a way it's true because the heated metal of the pan has a smell. I started noticing changes in my early 30's. By last year I was starting to say "what smell?" a lot. Yesterday I was so startled at the intensity of some of the things that I smelled that i thought it was all coming from me! It took a while to figure out what was happening.

JAG

9 days, 11 hrs.
Unbelieveable.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

17 Sep 2004, 00:59 #18

OH....Now I get it!!! This explains why my wife smells so much worse now after she smokes than she smelled before I quit tobacco. I would have never guessed!! Thanks Joel

Kevin
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Oct 2004, 13:15 #19

Even before I quit smoking, my sense of smell was better than that of most other people I know. Now that I have quit, the smells of the world around me are to the point of being almost overwhelming. Very distracting, for the most part too intense to be enjoyable... Downright nauseating on a regular basis...

To a lesser extent, I am noticing this with the taste of things, also. That the taste of things is too intense to be enjoyable...

Mostly it's smells that are bothering me. Is this something that I will probably eventually get used to? Any suggestions on how to make it more tolerable in the mean time? I feel like I am being bombarded with smells... Assaulted by them...

I know it is absurd to be thinking about how the smells and tastes would be more manageable if I went back to smoking. Absurd, yes, but then, my junky thinking always is... That does seem like a new level of absurdity for me, though, to be telling myself that I should start smoking again so that I wouldn't be overwhelmed by the smells and tastes of things.

I would rather be overwhelmed by the smells around me than overwhelmed by being the slave to my addiction. But if there were ways to deal with the overpowering smells and tastes, I'd sure like to know!

Thanks...

Deborah

Quit for 1 month, 1 week, and 2 days
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Apr 2005, 19:23 #20

I see some of our members are starting to recognize the benefit of the more accurate sense of smell in their first springtimes as ex-smokers.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

20 Mar 2006, 07:13 #21

Everything smells the same after we quit. It is the recovery of our senses (pun intended) that gives us the full realization of what we have been unable to detect while we laid coating after coating of tobacco slime over our nasal passages and mouths. The natural world holds many wonders for all who choose to live nicotine free, naturally, by never taking a puff.

JoeJFree - from tobacco & nicotine for One Year, Two Months, Nine Days, 7 Hours and 55 Minutes, (433 days)
Not consumed 10833, and saved $2,189.16.
Reclaimed 37 days, 14 hours and 46 minutes to use as I Choose!
NTAP!
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Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 23:23

19 Apr 2006, 01:16 #22

Everything does smell and taste better. Every scent I smell, every nibble I taste -- the flavors from smell and taste are intensified.

I even smell things before 'non smokers'...and I can identify the scent I'm smelling. Maybe they are so used to scents that they don't really smell them (kind of like stopping to smell the flowers). I can even be upstairs when my significant other is in the kitchen and I can smell him chopping cilantro or cutting onions/garlic. I can smell coffee from afar when it first begins to perk.

It is kind of comical, there aren't many things that I pick up into my hands that I don't put to my nose to smell---

Ahhhh...how wonderful to walk through life and have the ability to smell all the wonderful scents before us.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Jun 2006, 19:18 #23

The question was posed of whether or not an individual will ever get to the point that he or she will will not like the smell of cigarette smoke. There is real variation in this effect with ex-smokers.

Most will get to the point that they really don't like the smell of cigarette smoke. Some get there in a matter of days after quitting.

There are some people who seem to like the smell for the rest of their lives. They truly are the minority though.

There is one other interesting group. People who quit and still like the smell of smoke for quite a long time period--sometimes for years in fact. Then one day out of the blue, the person gets a direct whiff of smoke and it almost makes the person sick. The individual often goes on to despising the smell of smoke for the rest of his or her life.

I don't know what causes the sudden shift in senses, but I have seen this phenomena happen to quite a few people over the years.

Whether an individual likes the smell of smoke or not, he or she should know that by quitting that the vast majority of people that he or she encounters will like his or her smell more as long as he or she continues to stick to his or her personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:01

15 Jun 2006, 20:32 #24

It also helps to know that the tobacco industry add certain things to cigarettes to make them smell good. For a while I thought there must be something wrong in my head that I still appreciated the smell of a newly lit cigarette. Perhaps I always will. I have, after all, known a few never smokers who tell me they enjoy that smell also.

But I don't think there is anyone, smoker, ex smoker or never smoker who can honestly say they like the smell of an overflowing ashtray or the smell of stale smoke on clothing, in the car, in the house etc.

As long as we never take another puff, enjoying that smell occasionally will do little harm. Hopefully it is becoming an increasingly rare experience in any case as the world becomes increasingly tobacco free.

Maria - 57 days after 38 years
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Jun 2006, 20:34 #25

Earlier today I popped up the thread Cigarette Smoke Smell Good? It's not by accident.  addressing this issue.
Last edited by Joel on 22 Feb 2015, 03:50, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:32

23 Sep 2006, 01:37 #26

Oddly enough, I've been noticing how yucky certain things taste now. :o)
And certain flavors that seemed dull before are much more powerful. I've also realized that certain things are just bland!
The smell of smoke is noticeable on people to me now ... not quite repulsive, just ticks of a switch in my head that says "there's a smoker." Walking through a group of people smoking is ... odd. The smell isn't good, it's metallic and chemical ... it makes me wonder why I liked sucking it into my lungs so much. Perhaps I'll get to a point where it repulses me ... I hope not too soon, because I live with smokers and can't afford to get a new place yet!

Still, I am glad to be smoke free. It's been 15 days. Tasting and smelling things like I haven't in 10 years!
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Joined: 16 Jan 2003, 08:00

23 Sep 2006, 04:14 #27

TJKee,
You wrote: it makes me wonder why I liked sucking it into my lungs so much.
Exactly what I used to ask myself. It's what my daughter used to ask me on a regular basis.
The answer is simple: We liked it so much because it delivered the drug nicotine that we became physically addicted to.
Cigarettes, patches, dip, chew..they are all nicotine delivery devices.
Congratulations on choosing freedom.
No nicotine today, one day at a time.
Sal
Free and healing and smelling it all for three years, eight months, one week, three days
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on 19 Oct 2009, 00:33, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

09 Jan 2007, 23:40 #28

Everything smells & tastes the same after we quit. It is the recovery of our senses (pun intended) that gives us the full realization of what we have been unable to detect while we laid coating after coating of tobacco slime over our nasal passages and mouths. The natural world holds many wonders for all who choose to live nicotine free, naturally, by never taking a puff.
Some related older posts:
From:
Reasons to Quit - Sweet Smell of Success! & Quit - Even for the smell alone!!!!
My New Life ... Smells vs. Smells & Stinky Moments for Ex-smokers & My New Nose...
Stats Parade New Smells Parade!!! & What's your favorite smell parade?
There are so many more sensory related posts. Why? Could it be aht ridding your body of poison gives your entire system the chance to work normally? Why is that surprising? Because we ahve 'forgotten the face of our fathers'. Forgotten waht it is like to REALLY LIVE (or is that live really)! The human body has a wonderful ability to repair. Our body is quite amazing when left to its own devices.
JoeJFree - from tobacco & nicotine for One Year, Eleven Months, Thirty Days, 0 Hours and 0 Minutes, (729 days)
Reclaimed63 days, 6 hours and 46 minutes to use as I Choose!
NTAP!
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 24 Oct 2009, 00:19, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 May 2007, 10:15 #29

Everything smells & tastes the same after we quit. It is the recovery of our senses (pun intended) that gives us the full realization of what we have been unable to detect while we laid coating after coating of tobacco slime over our nasal passages and mouths. The natural world holds many wonders for all who choose to live nicotine free, naturally, by never taking a puff.
It's not that things smell better or worse than they ever have, it is our sense of smell returning to normal that allows us to notice what has always been there - both nice and not so nice.
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 19 Oct 2009, 00:35, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

03 Aug 2007, 00:22 #30

I have recently found that I can't bear the smell and taste of certain things. I quit 17 months ago and am now on the verge of becoming a vegetarian as I really cannot stand the smell of meat. Nor do I like the smell of anything metallic. It's very weird, but so totally worth it because I'm now free of the evil weed.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

26 Oct 2007, 20:51 #31

While not all things will smell better, one thing you should know for sure is that you are going to smell a whole lot better to the rest of the non-smoking world as long as you always remember to never take another puff!


Also, from above:


[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]The question was posed of whether or not an individual will ever get to the point that he or she will will not like the smell of cigarette smoke. There is real variation in this effect with ex-smokers. 

Most will get to the point that they really don't like the smell of cigarette smoke. Some get there in a matter of days after quitting. 

There are some people who seem to like the smell for the rest of their lives. They truly are the minority though. 

There is one other interesting group. People who quit and still like the smell of smoke for quite a long time period--sometimes for years in fact. Then one day out of the blue, the person gets a direct whiff of smoke and it almost makes the person sick. The individual often goes on to despising the smell of smoke for the rest of his or her life. 

I don't know what causes the sudden shift in senses, but I have seen this phenomena happen to quite a few people over the years. 

Whether an individual likes the smell of smoke or not, he or she should know that by quitting that the vast majority of people that he or she encounters will like his or her smell more as long as he or she continues to stick to his or her personal commitment to never take another puff. 

Joel[/font]
Last edited by Joel on 02 Dec 2013, 22:34, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

23 Aug 2008, 01:51 #32

Recovering and regaining our senses - one day at a time by choosing to not take another puff.
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 19 Oct 2009, 00:38, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Sep 2008, 10:24 #33

Everything smells & tastes the same after we quit. It is we who perceive things differently, .......really.....truly....when we give ourselves the chance to experience what was there under our noses all the time. (sorry couldn't resist). Hidden under a cloud of stinky smoke.
It is the recovery of our senses (pun intended) that gives us the full realization of what we have been unable to detect while we laid coating after coating of tobacco slime over our nasal passages and the mucous membranes in our mouths. The natural world holds many wonders for all who choose to live nicotine free, naturally, by not taking another puff....only for the rest of today.
I wish I could explain how good this journey gets. It's beyond imagining in the beginning but so worth the ride. Find out for yourself. You won't be disappointed, I guarantee. NTAP.

Joe J free
44 months 1 day
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 02 Sep 2010, 11:49, edited 3 times in total.
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Joined: 23 Aug 2010, 14:26

02 Sep 2010, 13:23 #34

I find the world around me does not always smell the best! Smoking seemed to have masked those smells. Sometimes I'll smell something and won't even know what it is! A lot of things taste better, some others taste different. It's amazing how smoking messes with a persons senses like that.
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Joined: 01 Feb 2011, 08:13

22 Feb 2011, 22:58 #35

I have been quit for almost a month and pretty happy about it, except for one thing: the smelling.

Even when I was a smoker I still had a pretty good sense of smell but now it's overwhelming.

Now I dread walking outside in the city because of all the smell from diesel, bad restaurants and whatever else is on my way.
A couple nights ago, I was hanging out in a bar with friends, and I could smell their breath loaded with alcohol (or smoke or both) when they talked to me, and that was almost making me sick... the music was loud so I couldn't step back and still hear them.  I ended up leaving early because of it.

I am not considering going back to smoking, of course... but I really need to find a way to dampen my sense of smell if I want to be able to do as a non smoker everything I did as a smoker...

I don't really care that much about being able to smell the things that smell good, and it certainly doesn't make up for having to smell all the bad smelling things.

I was directed to this thread, and I'm hoping someone can recommend a few tricks to deal with this. I just don't want to smell those things at all!
thank  you.
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