Is cold turkey the only way to quit?

Is cold turkey the only way to quit?

Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

December 20th, 2003, 5:51 am #1

Joel's Reinforcement Library





Is cold turkey the only way to quit?




I have seen it written that we have said that the ONLY way to quit smoking is to quit cold turkey. This is not a totally accurate statement. It is not that cold turkey is the only way to quit,; it is just that cold turkey is the method which gives people the best chance of success. It is the method that all but a small percentage of long-term ex-smokers in the world used to successfully quit smoking.

There are people who have quit using alternative approaches. There are some who cut down gradually and actually succeeded at quitting. For every person who did it like this and succeeded, there are many many many many others who tried it and failed. The individual who used the method will think it is great because it worked for him or her, but since it works for so few people it will generally be recognized as a pretty ineffective technique by most people who do "real world" research into how to quit.

By "real world" research I mean by going to long-term ex-nicotine users who you know personally and finding out how they all got off nicotine. Again, you will very rarely find any who did it by gradual withdrawal. If you find a person like this who is now off years, you should never minimize the person's success. He or she quit smoking, likely doing it in a way that made it much more difficult than it needed to be, but still he or she did pull off the quit. The only advice that I would encourage that you share with the person is that now to stay off he or she must understand the bottom line method of sustaining his or her quit. That message is staying cognizant of the addiction and that the only true guaranteed method to stay off now is knowing never to administer nicotine again.

The same principle here applies to people who use NRT products. There are people who have quit this way. Again, it is a small percentage of the long-term ex-users out there, but they do exist. An individual who pulled it off this way will also feel that it is a great method for quitting. But again, this method works for a small percentage of people who try it and if you look into real world long-term quits you will have a very hard time finding many people who actually successfully got off nicotine this way.

I feel it necessary to use that phrase, "got off nicotine," as opposed to saying, "got off smoking." There are some major experts coming out and advocating that people should be given nicotine supplements forever to stay off of smoking. Can this work? Of course it can. If you can give people enough nicotine via supplements it will satisfy their need for nicotine. After all, this is the primary reason they were smoking at the end--to feed a nicotine addiction. If the smoker can just get nicotine for the rest of his or her life via another route, he or she will avoid going through the three days of nicotine withdrawal.

The question needs to be, why should anyone have to pay what is likely to be tens of thousands of dollars to avoid a few days of withdrawal.? On top of this, these people will never be totally free of the moderate withdrawals that such usage is likely to keep going. These people will in fact tout the use of the product as a great aid, but when compared to what people who are totally nicotine free are experiencing, this victory over cigarettes is just a bit hollow.

There are a few people though whom you may encounter over your lifetime that did quit using NRT's as intended, weaning down for week after week and eventually quitting. If the person is now off for years, he or she is pretty much in the same state as a person who had quit cold turkey. He or she is nicotine free, and he or she should be thrilled by that fact. In some ways I look at people like this with a bit of awe, for they in all likelihood stuck with a process that was pretty much a gradual and prolonged withdrawal and yet they succeeded.

Again, debating the merits of their method with them is pretty much a moot point. It worked for them and you are going to have a pretty hard time convincing them that it is an ineffective method. But you do have a message that you can share with them that they do need to know. That message is that even though they are off nicotine for years, they still need to recognize that they are not cured of nicotine addiction and never will be. No matter how they had stopped, they must still understand the bottom line message, that the only way to stay free now is staying totally committed to never administer nicotine again via any nicotine replacement source and to never administer nicotine again from the original source that likely started the whole process by knowing to never take another puff!
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

January 22nd, 2004, 11:14 pm #2

Last edited by Joel on April 14th, 2016, 1:03 am, edited 4 times in total.
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January 24th, 2004, 6:48 pm #3

New video added August 13, 2012







Last edited by Joel on August 13th, 2012, 1:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

February 5th, 2004, 7:19 am #4

"I feel it necessary to use that phrase, "got off nicotine," as opposed to saying, "got off smoking." There are some major experts coming out and advocating that people should be given nicotine supplements forever to stay off of smoking. Can this work? Of course it can. If you can give people enough nicotine via supplements it will satisfy their need for nicotine. After all, this is the primary reason they were smoking at the end--to feed a nicotine addiction. If the smoker can just get nicotine for the rest of his or her life via another route, he or she will avoid going through the three days of nicotine withdrawal.

The question needs to be, why should anyone have to pay what is likely to be tens of thousands of dollars to avoid a few days of withdrawal.? On top of this, these people will never be totally free of the moderate withdrawals that such usage is likely to keep going. These people will in fact tout the use of the product as a great aid, but when compared to what people who are totally nicotine free are experiencing, this victory over cigarettes is just a bit hollow."




New video added September 22, 2012 related to this issue:


Last edited by Joel on September 24th, 2012, 12:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:59 pm

February 18th, 2004, 7:48 pm #5

Hi joel
I personally know that cold turkey is best,i have witnessed people using nrt but not quite in what i would call an educated matter,i see people use it as a way to withdraw from nicotine and a rather long beating about the bush way if you ask me,a lot of these people use the nrt to gradually withdraw nicotine from their system to make withdrawal easier at the final stage,the trouble is that they still don,t admit addiction,they still think that they chose to smoke and they still think that they have given up something and the nrt is a way of a magic pill that will remove desire,i spoke to a girl last week who was on patches but still lit up and boasted that she only had two,this is where nrt fails for me,feeding an addiction will still leave the desire to feed the addiction,she said that the problem was that even although she was receiving nicotine through a patch it was the habit of holding the cigarette that was the problem,obviously this is a smokers lie because the cigarette is just another way of administering nicotine,if i was an alcoholic i would,nt discuss something so bizarre as saying i can quit the alcohol but it is the lifting of the glass that is giving me the problem.
Rickdabler 11 months 1 week 2 days 8hrs happily nicotine free.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:58 pm

February 18th, 2004, 8:36 pm #6

Hi Rick!

Junkie thinking is a funny thing! If we were alcoholics instead of nicotine addicts who knows WHAT sort of LIES we would tell ourselves to keep drinking. I think I used just about every "smoker's lie" in the book to allow me to keep smoking!

The bottom line today for me is that I have the junkie locked up today. As long as he doesn't have access to my keys, wallet, or mind he will not be able to control my life like he did before I found Freedom! And as long as I remember the simple rules I have learned here today will be a GREAT smoke-free day--never take another puff one day at a time!

yqb, David Three months, one week, three days, 22 hours, 36 minutes and 11 seconds. 1852 cigarettes not smoked, saving $138.97. Life saved: 6 days, 10 hours, 20 minutes.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

March 6th, 2004, 8:35 pm #7

From Above:
There are a few people though whom you may encounter over your lifetime that did quit using NRT's as intended, weaning down for week after week and eventually quitting. If the person is now off for years, he or she is pretty much in the same state as a person who had quit cold turkey. He or she is nicotine free, and he or she should be thrilled by that fact. In some ways I look at people like this with a bit of awe, for they in all likelihood stuck with a process that was pretty much a gradual and prolonged withdrawal and yet they succeeded.

Again, debating the merits of their method with them is pretty much a moot point. It worked for them and you are going to have a pretty hard time convincing them that it is an ineffective method. But you do have a message that you can share with them that they do need to know. That message is that even though they are off nicotine for years, they still need to recognize that they are not cured of nicotine addiction and never will be. No matter how they had stopped, they must still understand the bottom line message, that the only way to stay free now is staying totally committed to never administer nicotine again via any nicotine replacement source and to never administer nicotine again from the original source that likely started the whole process by knowing to never take another puff!
I actually met a person who quit by using NRT yesterday. She was off over a year now. She approached me because she was still feeling that it was hard not to smoke at times or at times she still wanted a cigarette. I started to address the importance of recognizing the addiction involved and to understand that while she may still want a cigarette at times, it is highly unlikely that she really wants to be a full-fledged smoker again. She concurred with that. I am trying to get her to come to the first session of my next clinic to help her to cement her resolve.

The reason I am bringing this up it to clarify the point that there are some people out there who do quit by other approaches than cold turkey and are then able to sustain their quits over the long-term. There are just so few of them that it makes an encounter with them a noteworthy event. I talk to people about quitting smoking daily. When promoting a clinic I will be talking to dozens of people a day--many successful ex-smokers. I can't remember the last time I encountered a successful long-term ex-smoker who used NRT as recommended and got off the NRT and stayed off of cigarettes. It had to be months ago that I had my last such encounter.

It was interesting because she had actually quit cold turkey three days before she started NRT, but decided that she should get a little extra help. Her pharmacist told her not to do it, that she was already free and would now be reintroducing nicotine into her body. She disregarded the advice. Again, it worked for her so to some degree debating with her about quit methodology is pretty much a moot point. Although, being that she works in health care I felt the need to help her to understand that while her method worked for her, she may want to think hard about how she would advise others to quit. I asked her how many other long-term ex-smokers she knew who had quit by the same method and she realized that she could not come up with any person that she knew. I strongly encouraged her to go out and verify how her all of her long-term successful ex-smoking family and friends had actually stopped. I suspect she will quickly see the trend and over time when offering advice to any new person wanting to quit that the advice will be to simply quit smoking and to stay free to simply remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

May 13th, 2004, 2:33 am #8

Since I am often misquoted as to saying that cold turkey is the only way to quit, I thought it would be a good idea to get this one up near the top. I think many of you will recognize how Jeanne's story fits well into this article, where it says:

The question needs to be, why should anyone have to pay what is likely to be tens of thousands of dollars to avoid a few days of withdrawal.? On top of this, these people will never be totally free of the moderate withdrawals that such usage is likely to keep going. These people will in fact tout the use of the product as a great aid, but when compared to what people who are totally nicotine free are experiencing, this victory over cigarettes is just a bit hollow.

There are a few people though whom you may encounter over your lifetime that did quit using NRT's as intended, weaning down for week after week and eventually quitting. If the person is now off for years, he or she is pretty much in the same state as a person who had quit cold turkey. He or she is nicotine free, and he or she should be thrilled by that fact. In some ways I look at people like this with a bit of awe, for they in all likelihood stuck with a process that was pretty much a gradual and prolonged withdrawal and yet they succeeded.

Again, debating the merits of their method with them is pretty much a moot point. It worked for them and you are going to have a pretty hard time convincing them that it is an ineffective method. But you do have a message that you can share with them that they do need to know. That message is that even though they are off nicotine for years, they still need to recognize that they are not cured of nicotine addiction and never will be. No matter how they had stopped, they must still understand the bottom line message, that the only way to stay free now is staying totally committed to never administer nicotine again via any nicotine replacement source and to never administer nicotine again from the original source that likely started the whole process by knowing to never take another puff!
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

September 9th, 2004, 8:51 am #9

We have a post on the board today titled One in a Billion! The content of the post actually has nothing to do with why I am attaching it to this string but a few events today made me think about that post and this one together.

I actually had three contacts with people who had successful quit experiences with patches or gum. Actually, the first one was in a phone conversation with a woman who basically knew people who had quit by using NRT so it wasn't actually a first hand experience. The second and third contact though happened at a meeting where I was letting people know about my next clinic. I talked to about 50 people one on one at this gathering.

One woman had quit back in 2001 using NRT and following the directions. I spent the bulk of my time with her explaining relapse prevention issues. There was also a man who had quit cold turkey for a few days, then introduced NRT using it sporadically for a few months, but has now been off years.

Talking with three people in one day who had positive experiences with NRT really surprised me. I was kind of looking around for a hidden camera and waiting for a person to jump out and say, "smile, your on candid camera." (A television show from the 60's where people are put into practical joke situations for entertainment value.)

If you look at post 9 in this string I had another encounter with a person who quit by using NRT. If I am not mistaken it was the last time I encountered a person in one of these kind of setting who had quit this way. I truly rarely encounter people in real world settings who are long term success story. That is why three in one day after a six month dry-spell was so shocking.

This post addresses their existence though. As it says in the original post, "debating the merits of their method with them is pretty much a moot point. It worked for them and you are going to have a pretty hard time convincing them that it is an ineffective method. But you do have a message that you can share with them that they do need to know. That message is that even though they are off nicotine for years, they still need to recognize that they are not cured of nicotine addiction and never will be. No matter how they had stopped, they must still understand the bottom line message, that the only way to stay free now is staying totally committed to never administer nicotine again via any nicotine replacement source and to never administer nicotine again from the original source that likely started the whole process by knowing to never take another puff!"
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

November 12th, 2004, 8:38 pm #10

Being that I am bringing up lots of materials on cold turkey quitting, I think it is important that I keep this article also up near the top. We have never said that cold turkey is the only way to quit smoking, although we are quoted as saying it often.

Even the article I was in a few weeks ago from my local area quoted me as making that comment. The comment that we often make is that contrary to popular belief, cold turkey is the method employed by most successful quitters and that it is the method that gives people the best chance of succeess.

The first part of that comment is likely to be accepted by most people, but the second half is likely to be dismissed by many experts in the field. Our mission here at Freedom is not to try to convince the rest of the world to adopt our views though--it is to help every person who finds their way to us to see that quitting smoking is possible and staying free is totally doable for any person who simply quits smoking and then sticks to a personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

May 31st, 2005, 5:38 pm #11

I just pulled a string where a few days back a member wrote asking what our opinion of hypnosis was and where John attached the following review. Then, days later another member wrote that she used hypnosis and found it helpful.

I am attaching the comments here in this string for in many ways it is addressing the same issue. Are there some people who you will encounter over your lifetime who have quit by hypnosis, or acupuncture, or other alternative treatments? Sure there are. But for every one person who has successfully pulled off a quit by using these techinques there are dozens or maybe hundreds who have failed.

At Freedom we work on a different premise than most other sites. Most sites will endorse promoting the concept of try what ever works for some people, even if the suggested technique only works for only a small percent of people who try it. We work on the premise of utilizing strategies that have been used by most people who have successfully quit smoking.

Other posts addressing this issue are The Teaching of Conventional Wisdom at Freedom and "Do whatever it takes to quit smoking".
From: John (Gold) Sent: 5/25/2005 7:47 PM
Lou, I'm attaching what is so far the definitive authority on the effectiveness of hypnosis as an aid to smoking cessation. It is cited as the leading authority in the U.S. Dept. of Health's June 2000 Guideline.


From The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2005. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. All rights reserved.

Hypnotherapy for smoking cessation (Cochrane Review)
Abbot NC, Stead LF, White AR, Barnes J
ABSTRACT
A substantive amendment to this systematic review was last made on 18 February 1998. Cochrane reviews are regularly checked and updated if necessary.

Background: Hypnotherapy is widely promoted as a method for aiding smoking cessation. It is proposed to act on underlying impulses to weaken the desire to smoke or strengthen the will to stop.

Objectives: The objective of this review was to evaluate the effects of hypnotherapy for smoking cessation.

Search strategy: We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register and the databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, SCI, SSCI and CISCOM using the terms smoking cessation and hypnotherapy or hypnosis in February 2005.

Selection criteria: We considered randomized trials of hypnotherapy which reported smoking cessation rates at least six months after the beginning of treatment.

Data collection and analysis: Two authors extracted data on the type of subjects, the type and duration of the hypnotherapy, the nature of the control group,the outcome measures, method of randomization, and completeness of follow up.The main outcome measure was abstinence from smoking after at least six months follow up in patients smoking at baseline. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence in each trial, and biochemically validated rates where available. Those lost to follow up were counted as smokers. Where possible, we performed meta-analysis using a fixed-effect model.

Main results: Nine studies compared hypnotherapy with 14 different control interventions. There was significant heterogeneity between the results of the individual studies, with conflicting results for the effectiveness of hypnotherapy compared to no treatment or to advice. We therefore did not attempt to calculate pooled odds ratios for the overall effect of hypnotherapy. There was no evidence of an effect of hypnotherapy compared to rapid smoking or psychological treatment.

Authors' conclusions: We have not shown that hypnotherapy has a greater effect on six month quit rates than other interventions or no treatment. The effects of hypnotherapy on smoking cessation claimed by uncontrolled studies were not confirmed by analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Citation: Abbot NC, Stead LF, White AR, Barnes J. Hypnotherapy for smoking cessation. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 1998, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD001008. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001008.


This is an abstract of a regularly updated, systematic review prepared and maintained by the Cochrane Collaboration. The full text of the review is available in The Cochrane Library (ISSN 1465-1858).
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Abstracts of Cochrane Reviews are compiled and produced by Update Software Ltd[/size] on behalf of the publisher, John Wiley & Sons Ltd.[/size][/size]
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

August 14th, 2005, 11:00 pm #12

Being that I am bringing up materials on cold turkey quitting, I think it is important that I keep this article also up near the top. We have never said that cold turkey is the only way to quit smoking, although we are quoted as saying it often.
The comment that we often make is that contrary to popular belief, cold turkey is the method employed by most successful quitters and that it is the method that gives people the best chance of succeess.

The first part of that comment is likely to be accepted by most people, but the second half is likely to be dismissed by many experts in the field. Our mission here at Freedom is not to try to convince the rest of the world to adopt our views though--it is to help every person who finds their way to us to see that quitting smoking is possible and staying free is totally doable for any person who simply quits smoking and then sticks to a personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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September 12th, 2005, 10:38 pm #13

I like to bring this one up whenever I bring up cold turkey articles.

I just wrote the following commentary in the post So how did most successful ex-smokers actually quit?:

I see where a member who just made her one year anniversary commented on how she originally felt that she had a slim chance of success considering that she read that only ten percent of people who quit smoking cold turkey succeed till six months and only five percent make it for a year.

She is right, that statement is written and quoted all over the Internet and in lots of professional publications. Kind of gives the impression that quitting cold turkey is quite improbable and makes the recipient of the message almost think it is a total waste of time to even attempt to quit since the odds of success are so small. It pretty much sounds like quitting smoking is a futile effort and that there must not be many successful ex-smokers out in the world today.

Well, any person who bothers to go out in the world and actually talks to people are in for a surprise. There are plenty of successful ex-smokers in the world and the vast majority quit by going cold turkey.

In America today we have more former smokers than current smokers. Over 46 million Americans have quit smoking. (For anyone who thinks it is impossible to quit smoking) It has to be obvious to all that people are able to quit smoking. As this article discusses the vast majority of the long-term ex-smokers did in fact quit by going cold turkey.

People who succeed by following the advice given at this board are not indicative of a few isolated success stories. They are just another small group among the tens of millions of other people in the world who have quit smoking and then discovered that they were able to stay free as long as they stuck to a personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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November 4th, 2005, 6:15 pm #14

I am starting to see where cold turkey quitting is starting to get bashed pretty heavily in the media. One of the techniques that is being used is having smoking experts come out and say that while everyone seems to know one person who has quit cold turkey, that most people just cannot quit this way. They are trying now to undercut the real world examples that people are inevitably exposed to since since this is the way that most people have successfully quit smoking. I would agree that if a person just seemed to know only one person who had successfully quit smoking by a certain technique, it would be a clear sign that maybe the technique was not very successful. The issue is that if people go through the trouble of finding out what technique was used by ALL of the people they know who had quit smoking, they would most likely find that most if not all of them were in fact cold turkey quitters.



Here is the standard commentary I use when addressing the issue of talking to ex-smokers: I really do encourage all people to take this survey, talking to long-term ex-smokers in their real world. People who you knew when they were smokers, who you knew when they were quitting and who you still know as being successful long-term ex-smokers. The more people you talk to the more obvious it will become how people quit smoking and how people stay off of smoking. Again, people quit smoking by simply quitting smoking and people stay off of smoking by simply knowing that to stay smoke free that they must never take another puff!

Again, go talk to as many long-term successful ex-smokers (people off all forms of nicotine for at least a year or longer) in your real world that you can find and find out how they quit. I don't believe that there is a single professional smoking cessation NRT advocate who will suggest to their patients that they take a similar survey. For if they did their credibility would be called into question almost immediately when the patient starting seeing the results of their real life survey.
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November 26th, 2005, 10:01 pm #15

Being that we are two days past Thanksgiving here in America, a lot of people are probably getting a little tired of "cold turkey." While some people may find it becomes a little mundane for another meal, it is still a great recipe for successful quitting. So today, whether you are quitting cold turkey (the food) or cold turkey the technique, just your smoking quit will be staying strong and secure as long as you stick with your personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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January 27th, 2006, 9:03 pm #16

I really do encourage all people to take this survey, talking to long-term ex-smokers in their real world. People who you knew when they were smokers, who you knew when they were quitting and who you still know as being successful long-term ex-smokers. The more people you talk to the more obvious it will become how people quit smoking and how people stay off of smoking. Again, people quit smoking by simply quitting smoking and people stay off of smoking by simply knowing that to stay smoke free that they must never take another puff!

Again, go talk to as many long-term successful ex-smokers (people off all forms of nicotine for at least a year or longer) in your real world that you can find and find out how they quit. I don't believe that there is a single professional smoking cessation NRT advocate who will suggest to their patients that they take a similar survey. For if they did their credibility would be called into question almost immediately when the patient starting seeing the results of their real life survey. They will end up having to spend quite a bit of time trying to explain away the discrepancy, using excuses like the people who used NRT didn't use it right or didn't use it long enough or were more addicted smokers.

We don't need to spend time trying to explain away the results of the surveys that people will do in there real world settings. All we have to say is the results make it more and more obvious that the way to quit smoking and to stay successfully free is no more complicated than just making and sticking to a personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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November 25th, 2006, 4:20 am #17

I saw acupuncture was mentioned by one of our new members. The above comment addresses any quitting product or service:

There are people who have quit using alternative approaches. There are some who cut down gradually and actually succeeded at quitting. For every person who did it like this and succeeded, there are many many many many others who tried it and failed. The individual who used the method will think it is great because it worked for him or her, but since it works for so few people it will generally be recognized as a pretty ineffective technique by most people who do "real world" research into how to quit.
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December 17th, 2006, 2:41 am #18

Through personal experience the answer is - YES. No ifs no buts.

Sharry

I have been quit for 1 Week, 5 Days, 11 hours, 47 minutes and 8 seconds (12 days). I have saved £37.47 by not smoking 187 cigarettes. I have saved 15 hours and 35 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 04/12/2006 07:54
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December 21st, 2006, 10:36 pm #19

Much money is being made in the private sector by selling NRT products.
Therefore there are no advocates in the private sector promoting "Cold
Turkey" because there is no money to be made by it.

Tom
36 months
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November 11th, 2007, 9:50 pm #20

I saw a new member who mentioned that she once quit for three years by being hypnotized. I am going to pop up a few post that address this issue.
From above, with a little modification:
There are a few people though whom you may encounter over your lifetime that did quit by being hypnotized. If the person is now off for years, he or she is pretty much in the same state as a person who had quit cold turkey. He or she is nicotine free, and he or she should be thrilled by that fact.

Again, debating the merits of their method with them is pretty much a moot point. It worked for them and you are going to have a pretty hard time convincing them that it is an ineffective method. But you do have a message that you can share with them that they do need to know. That message is that even though they are off nicotine for years, they still need to recognize that they are not cured of nicotine addiction and never will be. No matter how they had stopped, they must still understand the bottom line message, that the only way to stay free now is staying totally committed to never administer nicotine again via any nicotine replacement source and to never administer nicotine again from the original source that likely started the whole process by knowing to never take another puff!
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December 6th, 2007, 10:28 pm #21

I saw where a member wrote that he or she knew of a person who had successfully quit smoking for seven months by using Chantix. I am going to point out a couple of things here regarding this comment. First, we do not know how long the person used Chantix--meaning, did the person use it for a short time period and quit the Chantix early because of serious side effects--a situation that actually happens a lot, or, did the person have minimal or no side effects and in fact, end up using Chantix for two full rounds of treatment--meaning they may only be off it for one month now--clearly not proving one way or another that the person does in fact have staying power with his or her quit. Even in the best case scenario, that the person used Chantix for the recommended three month period--he or she is only four month post treatment now and we don't know that he or she is going to be able to sustain his or her quit. We really believe that the fair measurement of success in a person who has used a pharmacological intervention is has the person been able to maintain his or her quit for a year after treatment. There is no way in knowing this for a person who is off for just seven months no matter how you are measuring the drug effect on intervention. You can bet though with the numbers of people using Chantix that there are going to be success among them. If Pfizer's statistics are accurate, some three million people are using it. There are likely going to be thousands of people who are going to succeed when you have millions of people using any approach. The issues that need to be considered is how many of these people could have succeeded if they tried without the drug and more significant with this particular drug, how many of these people encountered side effects that made them suffer more than they needed to and may have actually resulted in serious risks. I hope anyone wanting to understand our views on these issues will spend the time and watch the following video:
Title Dial Up High speed Audio Length Added
WhyQuit's candid views about Chantix (and Champix) 17.8mb 53.3mb 7.11mb 48:16 10/19/07
Again, there will be people who do quit smoking by using this drug, or other drugs. As it says in the original post here:



There are a few people though whom you may encounter over your lifetime that did quit using NRT's as intended, weaning down for week after week and eventually quitting. If the person is now off for years, he or she is pretty much in the same state as a person who had quit cold turkey. He or she is nicotine free, and he or she should be thrilled by that fact. In some ways I look at people like this with a bit of awe, for they in all likelihood stuck with a process that was pretty much a gradual and prolonged withdrawal and yet they succeeded. Again, debating the merits of their method with them is pretty much a moot point. It worked for them and you are going to have a pretty hard time convincing them that it is an ineffective method. But you do have a message that you can share with them that they do need to know. That message is that even though they are off nicotine for years, they still need to recognize that they are not cured of nicotine addiction and never will be. No matter how they had stopped, they must still understand the bottom line message, that the only way to stay free now is staying totally committed to never administer nicotine again via any nicotine replacement source and to never administer nicotine again from the original source that likely started the whole process by knowing to never take another puff!
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

January 7th, 2008, 10:24 pm #22

There are a few people though whom you may encounter over your lifetime that did quit using NRT's as intended, weaning down for week after week and eventually quitting. If the person is now off for years, he or she is pretty much in the same state as a person who had quit cold turkey. He or she is nicotine free, and he or she should be thrilled by that fact. In some ways I look at people like this with a bit of awe, for they in all likelihood stuck with a process that was pretty much a gradual and prolonged withdrawal and yet they succeeded. Again, debating the merits of their method with them is pretty much a moot point. It worked for them and you are going to have a pretty hard time convincing them that it is an ineffective method. But you do have a message that you can share with them that they do need to know. That message is that even though they are off nicotine for years, they still need to recognize that they are not cured of nicotine addiction and never will be. No matter how they had stopped, they must still understand the bottom line message, that the only way to stay free now is staying totally committed to never administer nicotine again via any nicotine replacement source and to never administer nicotine again from the original source that likely started the whole process by knowing to never take another puff!
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

May 26th, 2008, 1:45 am #23

Thank you Joel for this.

You make another important point in this Chantix debate, which is that the long-term success for any quit still requires the basic intelligent reinforcement that nurtures us here at WhyQuit. Fundamental to this reinforcement is an understanding of the law of addiction and NTAP...

Ilona
(70 days)
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

May 26th, 2008, 2:36 am #24

Actually, over my first thirty years in the field my standard response for people who used to call me and ask me about other quitting methods was if they thought there was something better out there they should try it first. The string How does your program compare to... discusses this.

The introduction of Chantix was the first time I changed this stance. From its early introduction and the first encounters I had with people using the drug it was clear that there were problems that it was causing beyond the normal issues that people experienced when quitting smoking or using quitting aids. I never wanted the feeling that something I said encouraged any individual to try it and then have them go on to experiencing a serious side effect.



Related videos:


My Personal Views On Chantix
WhyQuit's candid views about Chantix
Resources regarding stop smoking aids
Last edited by Joel on July 25th, 2015, 11:13 am, edited 2 times in total.
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