Parker GOLD
Parker GOLD

1:02 AM - Aug 13, 2002 #21

Joel, many times I read the statistics that many people quit smoking 3-5 times before it sticks. Don't remember where these figures came from. Quite frankly, I didn't care. I found that to be the perfect support for 2 failed quits. Proved I was just being normal. My little junkie mind was secretly plotting to try and fail 3 more times before I had to get serious about it! How fortunate that I found Freedom and discovered the "trick". Just never take another puff!

Parker - 2 month, 1 week, 3 days and counting......
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Joel
Joel

5:36 AM - Sep 15, 2002 #22

I rode by a bus today that had a big sign on it from our State's Tobacco Control Program. Its message was that it takes the average smoker seven attempts to quit smoking. Underneath was some line about how it could take just one to succeed, but with no further clarification or elaboration.
I am not sure what they are thinking the message that it takes an average of seven times to quit is supposed to accomplish. Maybe it is to make a person feel better if he or she had failed six other times in the past. But what if a person has only quit four times, should he or she write off the next couple of attempts before they even start?
I personally think a simpler and much more effective message can be that whether you have quit dozens of times in the past or if this is your first attempt to quit, this quit can be the last one you will ever have to do as long as you know to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on 12:19 AM - Aug 20, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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Rickgoldx5
Rickgoldx5

10:38 PM - Sep 27, 2002 #23

Joel,
This is my first time quitting and your so right you can do it in one shot! I lurked here at freedom for a year before I got up enough guts to quit. Your library and the posts made my mind up for me! As they say this IS do-able and anyone out there that is scared, do what I did, read for the first 3 days, then jump in and enjoy a new life that is the greatest! I think being afraid of quitting kept me from quitting for a year, but it turned out to be a boogeyman and nothing else.

So please join us here at freedom and you'll never regret it!

Rick
Four months, three weeks, two days, 2 hours, 37 minutes and 7 seconds. 11980 cigarettes not smoked, saving $1,791.15. Life saved: 5 weeks, 6 days, 14 hours, 20 minutes.
Last edited by Rickgoldx5 on 12:23 AM - Aug 20, 2009, edited 2 times in total.
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Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

11:57 AM - Oct 28, 2002 #24

Quitting for the first time has a 100% success rate as long as you never take another puff.
Many never make it back after a relapse, and those that do, must endure the challenges associated with recovery. Some never get that chance to quit again. This would be one lesson better learned from someone else's mistake and not your own.
Last edited by Joanne Gold on 12:29 AM - Aug 20, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

10:41 PM - Oct 28, 2002 #25

Today will always be the most
important day in the rest of our lives!
Nicotine is an addictive drug with zero intelligence!
Motivation, education, understanding and support
are powerful tools for change. As Joanne just said,
there is absolutely no reason why all of us, including you,
can not succeed in arresting our addiction today!
Just one little rule - no nicotine today!
NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!
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r95 (green x2)
r95 (green x2)

11:56 PM - Dec 09, 2002 #26

I hope I am not too late to respond to this thread..

You will be happy to know that I am a first time quitter and till date it has been 52 days nic free for me.

The trick is to remember the rule. N.O.P.E. (Not One Puff Ever) and it is doable..



-r

Day 52 and grateful!
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Joel
Joel

8:10 AM - Dec 30, 2002 #27

Read Angela's post 1 year and 7 months.
Last edited by Joel on 12:31 AM - Aug 20, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

4:49 AM - Jul 27, 2003 #28

It is sadly amazing just how many websites of governments and major health organization are at this moment teaching new quitters not to worry about "cheating" or "slipping" (words that sugar-coat relapse).
They also teach them to expect it to take a specific number of stated quitting attempts before learning how to quit and stay quit. What they neglect to tell them - while implanting relapse expecations in their minds - are the lessons learned by attending the school-of-hard-quitting-knocks so that the quitter can succeed the very first time. What they fail to teach is the true power of that first puff of nicotine!







Just one rule - no nicotine today, Never Take Another Puff!
Last edited by John (Gold) on 2:00 AM - Sep 01, 2009, edited 2 times in total.
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CanadaBobGold
CanadaBobGold

10:36 AM - Aug 06, 2003 #29

It really is doable on a person's first attempt. After 37 years and 350,000 cigarettes, I stopped cold on January 1st this year. At the time, the only motivation I had to stay quit was the knowledge that I'd be disappointing a lot of people who were aware of my quit.

Luckily I stumbled on Freedom from Tobacco less than a week into the quit and was able to pick up enough of an education into nicotine addiction to help me stay off smoking.

Later on, the cumulative physical damage caused by all the smoking started coming to the forefront and that was all the extra motivation I needed to never take another puff.

Not everyone will have the "luck" to latch onto the quitting aids that I did, but the bottom line applies to us all. No matter what happens, no matter how tempting, just keep reminding yourself that all the hard work of quitting and staying quit will go "up in smoke" with just one puff. And it really does get easier as time goes on. Hard to imagine at first, and even after seven and a bit months, it's still something that I think about at least a minute or two every day, but the days pass, the satisfaction grows and sooner or later the confirmed addict has transformed into confirmed ex-smoker.

7 months, 4 days, 8 hours
$3069.27 CDN saved
7139 cigarettes not smoked
3 weeks, 3 days, 18 hours of my new life saved
Last edited by CanadaBobGold on 2:10 AM - Sep 01, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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GreenSolveg
GreenSolveg

11:25 PM - Jan 05, 2004 #30

This is very encouraging for me as it *is* my first time. I know lots of smokers and most of them have tried and failed to stop smoking at least a couple of times. I guess after seeing that one naturally assumes that's the way it has to be.
This site has made an unbelievable difference. I have a whole armory of knowledge now; whenever I want a cig I think:
--No wonder I want it: nicotine releases fat, sugar, endorphins and neurotransmitters into my system. Of course my body wants it. But wouldn't it be nice if my supplies of these chemicals could flow naturally, without nicotine?
--When I see a person drag on a cigarette, about 90% of that smoke stays in their lungs. That's a lot of toxic sludge!
--My mind starts sending signals, *not* when my nic level is low, but before it gets low--it wants to maintain saturation. This is a brainwashed effect and it will go away eventually.

etcetera. I must say: the urge for a smoke is pitifully feeble compared with the force of my new knowledge.
Erica
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Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

2:39 PM - Jan 21, 2004 #31

For new readers just looking in who for the first time in their lives are seriosuly considering quitting .
Last edited by Joanne Gold on 2:03 AM - Sep 01, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

1:52 AM - Aug 28, 2004 #32

Last edited by Joel on 2:12 AM - Sep 01, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

11:08 AM - Oct 27, 2004 #33

You can quit your first time. You will hear lots of material to the contrary; that you have to quit over and over until it finally takes. It is a common misconception being perpetrated by many sites and even professional clinics and organization basically explaining why people quitting using such programs or approaches don't often seem to succeed.

The idea that you "can't" quit the first time is absolutely wrong. The only reason it takes most people multiple attempts to quit is that they don't understand the addiction to nicotine. How could they, no one really teaches it. People had to learn by screwing up one attempt after another until it finally dawns on them how each time they lost it, it happened by taking a puff. If you understand this concept from the get go, you don't have to go through chronic quitting and smoking.

So learn from other people's mistakes, not your own. Going through a quit once is bad enough, going through it over and over again is horrible and should be avoided at all costs. The way to avoid it is to always remember to never take another puff!.
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Joel
Joel

10:22 PM - Nov 05, 2004 #34

Last edited by Joel on 2:15 AM - Sep 01, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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AllyBC
AllyBC

1:22 AM - Nov 07, 2004 #35

One of my main reasons for being so strong in this quit is that withdrawal was so bad for me this time that I never want to have to do it again! This is only my second quit, but I know it will be my last because I will never take another puff!

Allyson - Free and Healing for Twelve Days, 15 Hours and 20 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 10 Hours, by avoiding the use of 126 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $51.53.
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Jamie
Jamie

12:36 PM - Nov 14, 2004 #36

I am also on my first (and last) quit. I guess the big reason it works for me right now is reminding myself that my urge to smoke is going to go away whether I light up or not and I want to watch my sons and grandchildren grow up far more than I want that cigarette.
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

4:51 AM - Dec 27, 2004 #37

You can quit your first time. You will hear lots of material to the contrary; that you have to quit over and over until it finally takes. It is a common misconception being perpetrated by many sites and even professional clinics and organization basically explaining why people quitting using such programs or approaches don't often seem to succeed.

The idea that you "can't" quit the first time is absolutely wrong. The only reason it takes most people multiple attempts to quit is that they don't understand the addiction to nicotine. How could they, no one really teaches it. People had to learn by screwing up one attempt after another until it finally dawns on them how each time they lost it, it happened by taking a puff. If you understand this concept from the get go, you don't have to go through chronic quitting and smoking.

So learn from other people's mistakes, not your own. Going through a quit once is bad enough, going through it over and over again is horrible and should be avoided at all costs. The way to avoid it is to always remember to never take another puff!.

Joel
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ElevenPinkFlowers
ElevenPinkFlowers

11:06 PM - Jul 26, 2005 #38

For my lurker:
This is my first and last quit. And I just love it.
PinkFlowers
Loving it since 2 March 2005
Last edited by ElevenPinkFlowers on 2:18 AM - Sep 01, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

12:44 AM - Nov 13, 2005 #39

From: John (Gold) Sent: 11/12/2005 8:39 AM
School of Hard-Quitting-Knocks vs. One Simple Lesson

I located the below quitting attempt quotes at various Internet sites during the last few minutes. What all of these sites have in common is that they all wrongly suggest that a quitter cannot quit during their very first attempt and not one of them tell readers the magic secret that is eventually learned through the school of hard-quitting-knocks that if known and applied would 100% guarantee success the first time!
  • "It is common for smokers to make more than one quit attempt before succeeding for good"
  • "most smokers who try to quit make at least three attempts before succeeding"
  • "It generally takes three to four attempts at quitting before a smoker is successful long-term"
  • "Most tobacco users attempt to quit three to five times before succeeding"
  • "On average, ex-smokers try 4 times to quit before they actually quit for good"
  • "most long term abstainers fail 4 to 5 times before succeeding"
  • "Most smokers try to quit at least 4-6 times before succeeding"
  • "Most smokers make 4-11 quit attempts before finally succeeding"
  • "On average, smokers attempt to quit five times before succeeding"
  • "it takes an average of 5-6 attempts before finally succeeding"
  • "Most smokers/chewers attempt to quit 5-7 times before quitting for good"
  • "Research has shown that the average smoker makes six attempts to quit before succeeding"
  • "the average tobacco user makes 7 attempts to quit before succeeding"
  • "The average number of tries before succeeding is 7 to 8"
  • "They say it takes an average of 8 attempts before one quits smoking"
  • "On average, former smokers made 8-11 quit attempts before succeeding"
  • "the average smoker tries to quit 9 times before succeeding"
  • "The average American attempts to quit 10 to 15 times before succeeding"
  • "On average, former smokers made 11 quit attempts before succeeding"
  • "Most patients require several attempts before succeeding in quitting permanently"
I find it utterly amazing that so many cessation authorities would want to give quitters relapse expecations without telling them the secret to avoiding relapse. It's called obedience to the The Law of Addiction and around here it is presented in simplified form -- just four little words -- Never Take Another Puff!

Not discovering or being taught the law of addiction in time to save your life is a horrible horrible reason to die. If we only have time to share one quick piece of info with smokers within our sphere of influence then this is it -- just one hour, challenge and day at a time, Never Take Another Puff!

John (Gold x6)
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anhef
anhef

11:07 AM - Feb 22, 2006 #40

You said that "no one really teaches it." but someone does...you do...and so does everyone else here.
It's the knowledge that can be gained here that makes it possible to succeed on the first try.
It's the warnings, and encouragements, and tips that make it possible to get through those first few days, knowing that it will get better, and soon.
This place and everyone here is awesome! Here's a link to remind you just how awesome.

Relapse Prevention

Annie
So glad to have found freedom.
Last edited by anhef on 2:22 AM - Sep 01, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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SallyGL
SallyGL

7:36 PM - Mar 18, 2006 #41

I came across a statement that puzzled me in the little booklet produced by the Welsh Assembly and given out to would be quitters. At the end of a paragraph about NRT it says ''So it is much safer than tobacco and much less addictive'' Isn't nicotine just as addictive however it's administered? And to make matters worse when I took the short test under the heading '' Do I need NRT or Zyban'' the result indicated that I was very addicted and should try one of these 'medications' (my quotes). So according to this not only was I stopping smoking by a method nearly garanteed to fail, I was told that when I did fail not to feel guilty about it, just to try again and again.

I'm so glad I found this website.

I used to say to my children ''If at first you don't succeed, try, try and try again'' in the case of quitting smoking perhaps it should be ''If at first you don't succeed, die, die and die again''.

Sally
- Free and Healing for Eleven Days, 17 Hours and 31 Minutes after 40+ years of smoking.
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SallyGL
SallyGL

7:53 PM - Mar 18, 2006 #42

I've just realised that I might have implied in my last post that Zyban isn't a medication, which of course it is and I gather used successfully by some of my fellow Freedom quitters. Sorry if I upset anyone.

Sally
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Joel
Joel

9:33 PM - Mar 18, 2006 #43

Reading at other quit smoking sites
Last edited by Joel on 2:26 AM - Sep 01, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

9:44 PM - Mar 18, 2006 #44

Another string addressing Sally's concerns above: A Quitter's Dilemma: Hooked on the Cure
Last edited by Joel on 2:28 AM - Sep 01, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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thinkwild
thinkwild

3:21 PM - May 26, 2006 #45

"I must say: the urge for a smoke is pitifully feeble compared with the force of my new knowledge."
Erica
Last edited by thinkwild on 2:31 AM - Sep 01, 2009, edited 1 time in total.
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