If cigarettes were as deadly as you say they are...

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

18 Nov 2004, 03:20 #21

From the World Health Organization's Website

WHO Atlas maps Global Tobacco epidemic

15 October 2002|GENEVA -- Tobacco kills 560 people every hour or 13,400 people per day or 4.9 million people per annum. This death and disease toll spares no nations and no people. WHO's new Tobacco Atlas presents a visual view of this galloping worldwide epidemic. The Atlas provides detailed data from countries on the differences and similarities of the global tobacco control struggle. The comparative data shows that action - or inaction - of one country can affect the work of another.

"The Tobacco Atlas highlights, in an educational and creative fashion, diverse features of this important global epidemic," said Dr Gro Harlem Brundtland, Director-General, World Health Organization " Its simple presentation of complex epidemiological and statistical information allows everybody to understand the facts and use them effectively."

The Atlas is being promoted as a tool for policy makers as they seek to formulate national and international regulations on tobacco control. Tobacco consumption is increasing all over the world and will kill 8.4 million people a year by year 2020 if drastic control measures are not put into effect. One in two of today's young smokers will die from tobacco-related causes. The developing countries will bear the brunt of the death toll, accounting for over 70 percent of the projected deaths.

The Tobacco Atlas, produced in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, USA, provides a unique statistical profile of the epidemic. Visual presentations, such as colour maps and graphics, make thousands of statistics spring to life on a variety of tobacco issues. Among the presentations are similarities and differences between countries, the conduct of the tobacco companies, gender differences in tobacco consumption, investments by tobacco industry, the costs of tobacco use and illicit trade and litigation.

"Action taken today will determine the reality of tomorrow. The Atlas is a valuable resource in fighting the tobacco epidemic," said Dr Judith Mackay, author of the Atlas and Senior Policy Advisor to the Tobacco Free Initiative of the World Health Organization. The co author of the Atlas is Dr Michael Eriksen, former Director of the US Office on Smoking and Health and current consultant at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


The Tobacco Atlas comes at a time when WHO's Member States meet in Geneva for the fifth round of negotiations on the proposed Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). The Convention is scheduled to be ready by May 2003.
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JohnPolito
Joined: 11 Nov 2008, 19:22

10 Jul 2009, 03:03 #22

Smoking-attributable mortality and years of potential life lost
in 16 Brazilian capitals, 2003: a prevalence-based study

BMC Public Health. 2009 Jun 26;9(1):206. [Epub ahead of print]

Correa PC, Barreto SM, Passos VM.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: To establish the impact of tobacco smoking on mortality is essential to define and monitor public health interventions in developing countries.

METHODS: The Smoking-Attributable Mortality, Morbidity and Economic Costs (SAMMEC) software was used to estimate the smoking attributable mortality (SAM) in 15 Brazilian State Capitals and the Federal District for the year 2003. Smoking prevalence and mortality data of people aged 35 years or older were obtained for each city from the Brazilian Household Survey on Non Communicable Diseases Risk Factors (2002-2003) and from the Brazilian Mortality System (2003), respectively.

RESULTS: In 2003, of the 177,543 deaths of persons aged 35 years and older 24,222 (13.64%) were attributable to cigarette smoking. This total represents 18.08% of all male deaths (n=16,896) and 8.71% (n=7,326) of all female deaths in these cities. The four leading causes of smoking-attributable death were chronic airways obstruction (4,419 deaths), ischemic heart disease (4,417 deaths), lung cancer (3,682 deaths), and cerebrovascular disease (3,202 deaths). Cigarette smoking accounted for 419,935 years of potential life lost (YPLL) (279,990 YPLL for men and 139,945 YPLL for women) in the same period.

CONCLUSIONS: Tobacco use caused one out of five male deaths and one out of ten female deaths in the sixteen cities in 2003. Four leading causes of smoking attributable deaths (ischemic heart disease, chronic airways obstruction, lung cancer and cerebrovascular disease) accounted for 64.9% of SAM. Effective and comprehensive actions must be taken in order to slow this epidemic in Brazil.


http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2458/9/206
http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pd ... -9-206.pdf

Note: Full text PDF freely available from link immediately above.
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FreedomNicotine
Joined: 06 Dec 2008, 16:58

12 Nov 2009, 14:42 #23

From an earlier post in this strng by Joel:

.............People don't smoke because they are stupid, but they smoke because they are drug addicts. Keep in mind, whey you are dealing with people who have smoked for over 40 years, most of them got addicted before there was ever any health warnings on tobacco. They didn't know it was dangerous when they started. People smoking longer than 10 years didn't know that they were taking up an addictive product. Yes they knew it was dangerous--but they never intended on smoking that much or smoking that long when they first took it up.
Even people taking it up today are not sufficiently warned of how addictive and how dangerous this product is. Of course they know its dangerous and they now hear it is addictive, but very few people realize just how dangerous and how addictive.
If people are asked to rank cigarette smoking dangers compared to the dangers posed by pollution, or illegal drugs, or alcohol induced illnesses, or violence in our society, or the risks of being killed by a drunk driver, or the risk of infectious diseases like pneumonia or AIDS, cigarettes may end up in the middle or maybe even at the bottom of the list. In America, more people die from smoking than people killed in ALL accidents, murders, all suicides, all infectious diseases, all diabetes, all cirrhosis and all olf the AIDS deaths all combined.
Most people don't grasp the true magnitude of the dangers. Also, must people don't realize the true grip of the addiction that nicotine exerts. Worse of all, very few people are given any real understanding of how to take control of the addiction once it has been established. The combination of all of this lack of understanding leaves people ripe from taking up smoking and totally unprepared for getting off of it when they want to quit.
Try to see smokers for who they really are. They are drug addicts who very often do not have the understanding and tools in place to break free of their addiction. You do have the understanding and hopefully at some point they may turn to you for help. When they do share with them what we have shared with you. Help them understand that you were once where they were--you didn't understand why you smoked, why you should stop, how to stop and how to stay off. But once you learned all of this you were able to quit and have proven by example that you have been able to stay off. The example you will have proven is that you have stuck with your commitment to never take another puff!
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rosy
Joined: 18 Oct 2009, 08:31

05 Dec 2009, 22:13 #24

From the previous entry :
Most people don't grasp the true magnitude of the dangers. Also, must people don't realize the true grip of the addiction that nicotine exerts. Worse of all, very few people are given any real understanding of how to take control of the addiction once it has been established. The combination of all of this lack of understanding leaves people ripe from taking up smoking and totally unprepared for getting off of it when they want to quit.


Thank you WHYQUIT.com. - I now know.

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Free & Healing
Rosy
Stopped Smoking for One Month, Twenty Seven Days, 5 Hours and 23 Minutes, by avoiding the use of 1888 nicotine delivery devices. Quit Day : 09/10/2009.
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