I will quit when

Joel
Joel

June 5th, 2003, 8:56 am #26

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Joel
Joel

July 1st, 2003, 5:47 am #27

For LJ:

I am lifting two replies from earlier in this thread that address the concept of being nervous about facing different kind of stresses.
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Recommend Delete Message 4 of 26 in Discussion
From: Joel. Sent: 4/3/2001 3:56 AM
I saw where one of our newer members was going through some traumatic times due to the illness of a friend. Some things happen early on in a quit that make you think that if you knew they were going to occur you would never have stopped because there is no way you could cope without smoking. But when you do survive it makes you realize that these fears were unfounded, and while the events may still be tragic, the one good thing that comes out of the situation is the realization that you can survive real problems as an ex-smoker. This is a realization of great importance because real problems and crises will exist for all ex-smokers, just as they do for all smokers and never smokers. But the understanding that they are surmountable is crucial for the ex-smoker, and the only way to come to that understanding is by living through such trying times. Everyone must prove to himself or herself that they can get through everything, no matter how traumatic, without smoking.

Life can throw us many curves, but please understand that nothing can put you back to smoking as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Recommend Delete Message 5 of 26 in Discussion
From: Joel. Sent: 4/7/2001 6:29 AM

Avoiding real life now is scaring you and making you feel incapable of real life without smoking. The sooner you face various situations, the sooner you recognize that there is life after smoking. Everything you did as a smoker you can do as an ex-smoker. You just have to teach yourself how. You do that by simply facing all your old life situations and new life challenges, but always with your guard up and ammunition high of why you don't want to be a full-fledged smoker again. The way you will believe that you can live fully as an ex-smoker is to fully live as an ex-smoker. Prove to yourself you can do the things you fear. As long as you face your daily demands and extraordinary events that pop up mentally prepared with your reasons for quitting and your reasons for wanting to stay quit you will maintain the strength and resolve to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joel

August 26th, 2003, 3:27 am #28

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Joel
Joel

September 3rd, 2003, 3:20 pm #29

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Joel
Joel

October 3rd, 2003, 4:42 am #30

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Joel
Joel

October 4th, 2003, 5:06 pm #31

I had one clinic participant who yesterday, on her third day of not smoking, ended up sitting in the hospital all day while her child had to undergo surgery. I don't know the specifics of what the surgery was for or if it was planned or an emergency. All I know is she said that it was very stressful and yet an incredibly valuable experience for her because she got through the whole day with her very new quit still intact. She said after it was all over she reflected on what I had said to the group just three days earlier that I want people to quit under normal or rotten conditions. She said that she fully understood and appreciated what I meant by that because of her experience yesterday. She knew if she could quit under such circumstances she could sustain her quit under such circumstance. The same is true for everyone here--that quitting and staying free even under the most stressful of times is fully possible as long as you always stay focused on the reasons that you first decided to quit and on the importance of staying free now by always sticking to the commitment that you made to yourself to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joel
Joel

November 4th, 2003, 8:42 pm #32

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Joel
Joel

November 6th, 2003, 10:45 pm #33

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Joel
Joel

January 22nd, 2004, 8:15 pm #34

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Joel
Joel

February 2nd, 2004, 10:03 pm #35

I had to laugh at one milestone post today. It was from a member who just turned "green" (making one month) who had considered waiting until February to quit since it only had 29 days this year and would have turned "green" quicker. Thank goodness 2004 was a leap year or who knows what might have happened. I am going to kick up two other posts with this note for they all apply to this comment.

New comment for post:

"I will quit at the beginning of February for I will turn 'green' faster that way."
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Joel
Joel

May 21st, 2004, 5:40 pm #36

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Joel
Joel

June 2nd, 2004, 7:20 pm #37

I am lifting two replies from earlier in this thread that address the concept of being nervous about facing different kind of stresses.
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Recommend Delete Message 4 of 26 in Discussion
From: Joel. Sent: 4/3/2001 3:56 AM
I saw where one of our newer members was going through some traumatic times due to the illness of a friend. Some things happen early on in a quit that make you think that if you knew they were going to occur you would never have stopped because there is no way you could cope without smoking. But when you do survive it makes you realize that these fears were unfounded, and while the events may still be tragic, the one good thing that comes out of the situation is the realization that you can survive real problems as an ex-smoker. This is a realization of great importance because real problems and crises will exist for all ex-smokers, just as they do for all smokers and never smokers. But the understanding that they are surmountable is crucial for the ex-smoker, and the only way to come to that understanding is by living through such trying times. Everyone must prove to himself or herself that they can get through everything, no matter how traumatic, without smoking.

Life can throw us many curves, but please understand that nothing can put you back to smoking as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
Reply
Recommend Delete Message 5 of 26 in Discussion
From: Joel. Sent: 4/7/2001 6:29 AM

Avoiding real life now is scaring you and making you feel incapable of real life without smoking. The sooner you face various situations, the sooner you recognize that there is life after smoking. Everything you did as a smoker you can do as an ex-smoker. You just have to teach yourself how. You do that by simply facing all your old life situations and new life challenges, but always with your guard up and ammunition high of why you don't want to be a full-fledged smoker again. The way you will believe that you can live fully as an ex-smoker is to fully live as an ex-smoker. Prove to yourself you can do the things you fear. As long as you face your daily demands and extraordinary events that pop up mentally prepared with your reasons for quitting and your reasons for wanting to stay quit you will maintain the strength and resolve to never take another puff!
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johnny L irish
johnny L irish

June 3rd, 2004, 2:53 am #38


Thanks for the nice post, Joel. I must remember the old expression that "if I have a problem and smoke, now I have two problems." A cigarette does not solve my problems; I solve them. I don't see where it's written that lifelong non-smokers suddenly light up after the death of a loved one. We must learn by their example.

Johnny

109 days quit

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Joel
Joel

August 20th, 2004, 7:47 pm #39

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Joel
Joel

August 22nd, 2004, 5:37 am #40

For Jayna:

I guess I could have added I will quit when all of my smoking relatives quit or at least when they are willing to help me quit.
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Joel
Joel

September 28th, 2004, 7:57 pm #41

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Pryde65 GOLD
Pryde65 GOLD

September 28th, 2004, 8:58 pm #42

Haven't we all said this to ourselves while mentally gearing up for a quit? I know I have...I'll quit after this, or when that...or no, definitely not until after this happens...well, balderdash...If I hadn't quit when I did, I wouldn't have been able to dance so long and so freely, or sing so loudly, or hold my breath while swimming, or laugh without coughing, or exercise so strongly...or smell so sweet, or feel so proud.

The time is always right to quit. And now it must be.


Sue - Free and Healing for Fifteen Days, 10 Hours and 28 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 1 Day and 17 Hours, by not smoking 494 of those icky cigarettes. I now have $103.80 in my "me" account!!
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Joel
Joel

September 29th, 2004, 2:20 am #43

For Mari
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

October 27th, 2004, 11:07 am #44

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Joel
Joel

November 9th, 2004, 11:18 am #45

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Joel
Joel

December 8th, 2004, 6:53 pm #46

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Joel
Joel

December 11th, 2004, 6:58 am #47

Recommend Delete Message 4 of 26 in Discussion
From: Joel. Sent: 4/3/2001 3:56 AM
I saw where one of our newer members was going through some traumatic times due to the illness of a friend. Some things happen early on in a quit that make you think that if you knew they were going to occur you would never have stopped because there is no way you could cope without smoking. But when you do survive it makes you realize that these fears were unfounded, and while the events may still be tragic, the one good thing that comes out of the situation is the realization that you can survive real problems as an ex-smoker. This is a realization of great importance because real problems and crises will exist for all ex-smokers, just as they do for all smokers and never smokers. But the understanding that they are surmountable is crucial for the ex-smoker, and the only way to come to that understanding is by living through such trying times. Everyone must prove to himself or herself that they can get through everything, no matter how traumatic, without smoking. Life can throw us many curves, but please understand that nothing can put you back to smoking as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)
GrumpyOMrsS (Gold)

December 16th, 2004, 6:59 am #48

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Joel
Joel

February 22nd, 2005, 7:28 pm #49

Avoiding real life now is scaring you and making you feel incapable of real life without smoking. The sooner you face various situations, the sooner you recognize that there is life after smoking. Everything you did as a smoker you can do as an ex-smoker. You just have to teach yourself how. You do that by simply facing all your old life situations and new life challenges, but always with your guard up and ammunition high of why you don't want to be a full-fledged smoker again. The way you will believe that you can live fully as an ex-smoker is to fully live as an ex-smoker. Prove to yourself you can do the things you fear. As long as you face your daily demands and extraordinary events that pop up mentally prepared with your reasons for quitting and your reasons for wanting to stay quit you will maintain the strength and resolve to never take another puff!
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Joel
Joel

March 2nd, 2005, 7:48 am #50

From last year:
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Recommend Message 35 of 49 in Discussion
From: Joel Sent: 2/2/2004 8:03 AM
I had to laugh at one milestone post today. It was from a member who just turned "green" (making one month) who had considered waiting until February to quit since it only had 29 days this year and would have turned "green" quicker. Thank goodness 2004 was a leap year or who knows what might have happened. I am going to kick up two other posts with this note for they all apply to this comment.

New comment for post:

"I will quit at the beginning of February for I will turn 'green' faster that way."
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Share