I Will Quit When...

I Will Quit When...

Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

March 7th, 2001, 9:09 am #1

Joel's Reinforcement Library


I Will Quit When...


"I will quit when my doctor tells me I have to." "I can't quit now it's tax season." "Maybe I will quit on vacation." "School is starting and I'm too nervous to quit." "I will quit in the summer when I can exercise more." "When conditions improve at work, I will stop." "Quit now, during midterm, you must be nuts!" "Maybe after my daughters wedding." "My father is in the hospital. I can't quit now." "If I quit now, it will spoil the whole trip." "The doctor says I need surgery. I'm too nervous to try now." "When I lose 15 pounds, I will stop." "I am making too many other changes to stop now." "I have smoked for years and feel fine, why should I stop smoking now?" "I'm in the process of moving, and it's a real headache. I can't stop now." "It is too soon after my new promotion, when things settle down I will stop." "When we have a verifiable bilateral disarmament agreement, I will consider quitting." "It is too late. I'm as good as dead now."

Amazing, isn't it, how so many people can come up with so many excuses not to stop smoking? If any of these were valid reasons why now is not a good time to quit, when did 33,000,000 ex-smokers in our country stop? They must have been experiencing at least one of these situations during the initial quitting process. The only difference between successful ex-smokers and the smokers making these statements is that the ex-smokers were bright enough to recognize that smoking was not really necessary to deal with any of these situations.

The best time to quit is NOW. No matter when now is. In fact, many of the times specifically stated as bad times to quit may be the best. I actually prefer that people quit when experiencing some degree of emotional stress. In most cases, the more stress the better. This may sound harsh, but in the long run it will vastly improve the chances of long term success in abstaining from cigarettes.

When people quit at an easy time in their lives, they begin to feel comfortable as ex-smokers as long as no problems surface. But there is always the fear that when things get difficult they will not be able to cope without cigarettes. Many, when facing their first real catastrophe, return to smoking because they were not equipped to deal with real stress as ex-smokers.

If, on the other hand, they had quit during a difficult time, they would have realized that even under severe emotional stress life goes on without smoking. They will be secure in the knowledge that they can deal with crisis, any crisis, as non-smokers. Once they overcame the initial quitting process they found they were able to deal with stress better. They were able to meet the physical and emotional demands in their lives more efficiently than when they were smokers. They were truly better equipped for survival in our complicated world without the "help" of cigarettes.

So, no matter what is going on in your life, quit smoking. When things get tough - show yourself how tough you are. And once off smoking, deal with all future problems in as constructive a manner as you possibly can, always keeping one essential stress management technique foremost in your mind - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!


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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

March 7th, 2001, 9:12 am #2

One more for Tash. Not for I'll quit when but more for I will stay off when. Same concept applies. You can stay off over bad times, everyone must recognize this. The way you know it is true is by proving it to yourself and the way you prove it to yourself is by always remembering to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: January 7th, 2009, 7:17 pm

March 7th, 2001, 9:58 am #3

Thanks again Joel. I would not have made it through the stressful times without Freedom, had I not educated myself about my addiction, I would have relapsed long ago. Thank you! Thank you!
Now I know that I will Never Take Another Puff!

Tash
2 months + quit
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Joined: January 7th, 2009, 7:13 pm

March 7th, 2001, 11:46 am #4

Keeping it inside the bag makes it easy to not be honest....
I am glad I got out of the bag... and Freedom was there to pick up the pieces....
Thanks !!
pamela
Two months, four days, 15 hours, 31 minutes and 5 seconds. 1591 cigarettes not smoked, saving $361.99. Life saved: 5 days, 12 hours, 35 minutes.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

June 4th, 2001, 9:50 pm #5

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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

June 26th, 2001, 7:08 pm #6

There was a post up early this morning from a past member who had relapsed and who was now planning on quitting July 5. As per our new guidelines I pulled the post and wrote the person a letter of explanation that we now allow active participation for people who have actually quit smoking as opposed to a person who is just planning on quitting at some future date. Thought this letter would help the person and all people luring in who have not yet quit come to the realization that the best time to quit smoking is now and not at some future time.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

August 5th, 2001, 9:59 pm #7

I saw in Zep's post of Nora's quit story that this post and Never Take Another Puff articles weighed heavily on her early decision to quit. Though it seemed an appropriate reason to bring it up again today. Maybe next year a lurker from today will write us to tell us that he or she is celebrating one year today from the influence Nora had.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

August 5th, 2001, 10:03 pm #8

I am not sure which "never take another puff! article Nora was referring to, but I guess this one is as good as any.
Joel's Reinforcement Library


"Never Take Another Puff!"



I said it every day of the clinics, it's in almost all my posts, and you see it at the end of each of these short articles. Even so, I still feel I cannot repeat it enough - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF! It is not that I am afraid that you will like the cigarette and decide how wonderful going back to smoking will be. To the contrary, it will probably make you dizzy, nauseous, and generally sick. You may absolutely hate yourself for having done it. Even this, though, is not the problem.

The real danger is the reinforcement of the nicotine addiction. It is a powerful addiction. One puff can send you back to your old level of cigarette consumption within days. We have had clinic participants who have previously quit smoking for periods exceeding 20 years. One day they decide to try just one. Even after this great period of time, the first cigarette is enough to start the whole addiction withdrawal process. They are again hooked on a drug, and within days the full habit returns. All of the physical dangers, psychological problems, and tremendous expenses return to their previous levels. If you do not believe this can happen to you, come into the first or second night of my next stop smoking clinic. Listen to all of the new enrollees who are there to quit smoking. These are people who were once off cigarettes for a substantial period of time before, people who liked not smoking, people who loved not smoking, people who now need help to once again reclaim their nonsmoking status because of one tragic mistake. They were not immune to the first drag. The odds are, neither are you. Consider this the next time you have a passing thought for a cigarette.

Now you have a choice. You can remain an ex-smoker or you can become an addicted smoker once again. Consider both options carefully. Which way of life better suits you - a slave to a deadly weed or a truly free person? The final decision is yours. If you choose the latter, simply practice the following advice - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

August 15th, 2001, 7:08 pm #9

For Threecrows
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

August 16th, 2001, 11:23 am #10

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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

August 26th, 2001, 7:57 pm #11

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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

September 12th, 2001, 3:17 am #12

This post can be applied to staying off of smoking just as easily as it is about initially quitting smoking too. We are living through trying times, but each and every one of you are learning how to deal with such times as an ex-smoker. Hang in there everyone.

Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

September 14th, 2001, 4:53 am #13

For Jayne
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

October 14th, 2001, 8:58 pm #14

I know with the heightened state of warnings given out by our government officials, some people will think that putting quitting on hold is a legitimate idea. I guess I can add, "I will quit when every last terrorist threat worldwide is eradicated." But waiting for stability of the world is a mistake that many people make when thinking about quitting smoking. While the government officials may be right in saying that there is a real risk of other terrorist attacks in the future, the risk to any specific individual reading this here is negligible. At the same, the risk of putting off quitting smoking till the world problems are fixed, results in a risk of a one in two chance of dying from smoking.



I have brought this up before, the relative risk of dying from smoking as opposed to the relative risk of dying from other factors. If you look at the statistical odds of the average 20-year-old smoker alive today of dying prematurely, the relative risks are:



For every 1,000 twenty-year-old smokers alive today who do not quit smoking…



6 will die prematurely from being murdered

12 will die prematurely from accidents

500 will die prematurely from smoking!



There is no comparison. Don't let other perceived risks, real or not, cloud your thoughts on the real risks you carried from smoking. To reduce your real risk of premature loss of health and life always remember to never take another puff!



Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

October 22nd, 2001, 9:23 pm #15

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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

November 25th, 2001, 12:40 am #16

There is no "real" reason to wait for the holidays to pass to quit smoking. If you are a smoker who is lurking now and thinking this is just not the right time because of seasonal issues, forget it. The reason you are still smoking is not that this is a bad time to quit, it is because you don't yet want to quit. That is a shame for your health and life will stay on the line until you get to the point where you want are ready to do it. A smoker can quit anytime and an ex-smoker can stay off anytime as long as they all know that to stay smoke free simply means remembering to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

December 23rd, 2001, 11:30 pm #17

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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

December 26th, 2001, 7:35 pm #18

This message has been deleted by the manager or assistant manager.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

December 26th, 2001, 7:40 pm #19

For all those lurkers getting prepared to quit New Years Eve. Once again, there is no "real" reason to wait for next week to quit. Waiting for New Years just because that is how you always did it in the past has a real downside. It always failed in the past, for if not, you would not be reading here right now in preparation to quit, you would here reading in order to secure an existing long lasting quit, one that is at least almost a year old or even longer.



The best time to quit is now. That statement is true no matter when it is being said. But for the benefit of support here at Freedom, it is more true than normal. Waiting for New Years to quit with the idea that you would then get the maximal support has a real downside here at Freedom. We have the potential of getting flooded with membership, to a point where we may not be able to help you personally and to a point where we may not even be able to accept your membership in a timely fashion.

We have a past history here of being overloaded at New Years, to a point where we have to put hundreds of people on hold per day. This is not an exaggeration of the figures, last year we were crippled by the New Years influx. We were spending so much time in the administrative aspects of the board we were able to spend very little time on the board itself. This New Years holds the same potential.

So if you like the idea of individual support while in the early stages of your quit, don't put off till tomorrow what you can do today. New Years holds no special magic as the day to quit. A smoker can quit anytime and an ex-smoker can stay off anytime as long as they all know that to stay smoke free simply means remembering to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: January 7th, 2009, 7:25 pm

December 27th, 2001, 12:21 am #20

when I first found this site I was planning on picking a future quit date but after spending the evening reading joel's library and the message boards I simply have not wanted to take another puff as much as I thought I did.
My quit just happened that night and though I've tried to make it hard on myself and complicate it with all kinds of emotional **** its been amazingly easy. a glory in fact.
this isn't just a cute sound byte, its instructions for the rest of your life:
never take another puff.

kb
6 weeks 4 days
just wait till you feel freedom!
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Joined: December 19th, 2008, 12:29 am

December 27th, 2001, 12:59 am #21

Advice for lurkers who are waiting to quit: 1. Count how many days away from your "planned" quit date (write it down) 2. Calculate the number of cigarettes you will smoke between now and that date (be honest now, write it down) 3. Calculate the amount of money spent on cigarettes between now and that date (be honest again, write it down) 4. Finally, consider that one of those cigarettes might be the one that begins your fatal illness..... QUIT NOW!!! *Candy-wcsdancer* I started my quit 1 Month 2 Weeks 3 Days 12 Hours 56 Minutes 44 Seconds ealier than planned. If I waited, I would have poinsoned my lungs with an additional 570 cigarettes. I would have spent an extra $128.36. And I would have lost 3 days and 23 hours of my life. Did I say this already: QUIT NOW!
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

December 30th, 2001, 8:48 pm #22

For Janet
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

January 6th, 2002, 7:41 am #23

For Betsy, now that you are back into your real world.
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:58 pm

January 11th, 2002, 6:01 am #24

For NewMe
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Joined: December 18th, 2008, 11:57 pm

January 30th, 2002, 5:27 pm #25

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