I Will Quit When...

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Aug 2004, 09:38 #76

You will often hear people say that it is not a good idea to attempt too many life changes when you are quitting.
I also don't think that people need to go out of their way to make life changes when first quitting, and by no means should they ever be making major life decisions like quitting a job or ending a marriage the week they are quitting for in essence, they may not be working at the most rational level. Sometimes though major events do happen around people while they are quitting that are beyond their control. They didn't create the situations but they are forced to deal with them early on.

The advantage of such things happening early on is it teaches the ex-smoker how to institute problem solving and coping mechanisms that he or she once thought cigarettes were they only effective tool you had. Cigarettes were never an effective mechanism for either of these issues--all they did was help smoker to put off problem solving and to deliver a drug that was pulling him or her out of withdrawal when facing stressful circumstances.

Cigarettes never helped a smoker cope with stress--all they did was pull the smoker out of withdrawal that the stress was inducing that would not have actually been occurring if the person were not an active smoker at the time. It was a false calming effect.

The way people will recognize this over time is to get through new stresses and life changes, coming through them smoke free and doing an honest assessment comparing how they dealt with them this time and how you dealt with and felt when they experienced similar circumstances in the past while they were still a smokers.

People will usually realize in retrospect that they did overcome the traumatic times quicker and more effectively as ex-smokers. They will survive all life changes with their health, their quit and their life more intact as long as they always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

02 Sep 2004, 19:13 #77

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04 Oct 2004, 19:17 #78

For people waiting to quit for a more convenient time.
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 18:58

19 Oct 2004, 23:56 #79


Quit Today

And remember that just as "one puff" equals complete relapse so does "one day" smoke free equal them all. This is the great secret to quitting smoking if there ever was one. All that needs to be done is to begin each day with the attitude that "I am not going to smoke today!". One day at a time is the method that puts the "never" in never take another puff.

Ouija7 (Gold) -
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Nov 2004, 03:29 #80

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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

21 Nov 2004, 01:22 #81

For people who are starting to think that quitting now is just too close to the upcoming holiday season.

From above:

You will often hear people say that it is not a good idea to attempt too many life changes when you are quitting.
I also don't think that people need to go out of their way to make life changes when first quitting, and by no means should they ever be making major life decisions like quitting a job or ending a marriage the week they are quitting for in essence, they may not be working at the most rational level. Sometimes though major events do happen around people while they are quitting that are beyond their control. They didn't create the situations but they are forced to deal with them early on.

The advantage of such things happening early on is it teaches the ex-smoker how to institute problem solving and coping mechanisms that he or she once thought cigarettes were they only effective tool you had. Cigarettes were never an effective mechanism for either of these issues--all they did was help smoker to put off problem solving and to deliver a drug that was pulling him or her out of withdrawal when facing stressful circumstances.

Cigarettes never helped a smoker cope with stress--all they did was pull the smoker out of withdrawal that the stress was inducing that would not have actually been occurring if the person were not an active smoker at the time. It was a false calming effect.

The way people will recognize this over time is to get through new stresses and life changes, coming through them smoke free and doing an honest assessment comparing how they dealt with them this time and how you dealt with and felt when they experienced similar circumstances in the past while they were still a smokers.

People will usually realize in retrospect that they did overcome the traumatic times quicker and more effectively as ex-smokers. They will survive all life changes with their health, their quit and their life more intact as long as they always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

21 Nov 2004, 01:52 #82

The way people will recognize this over time is to get through new stresses and life changes, coming through them smoke free and doing an honest assessment comparing how they dealt with them this time and how you dealt with and felt when they experienced similar circumstances in the past while they were still a smokers.
People will usually realize in retrospect that they did overcome the traumatic times quicker and more effectively as ex-smokers. They will survive all life changes with their health, their quit and their life more intact as long as they always remember to never take another puff!

Joel

I hope it's ok to make a comment about this here.

THIS really hits home with me right now. This is part of my journey that I find absolutely amazing. I have had some issues I have faced head on recently and was pleasantly surprised how rational my thinking and how the old anxiety attack during an uncomfortable stress-producing situation DID NOT HAPPEN.

In the past these similar situations would have caused my heart to start pounding, my mind to start spinning, I would start doubting myself and then I'd back out of the situation, run away from the situation, be completely miserable for days and smoke myself sick thinking I was somehow relieving the stress and truly believing I was too weak to deal with the situation.

Not so now, I am proud to say!!!!!

I now face similar situations feeling strong, totally in control and able to deal with the situation.

It is TRULY amazing and an absolutely wonderful feeling. For even that reason alone I could NEVER consider going back to smoking!

Sandy - Free and Healing for Eight Months, Twenty Two Days, 10 Hours and 50 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 11 Days and 2 Hours, by avoiding the use of 3197 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $1,293.08.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Nov 2004, 22:57 #83

I saw where a newer member wrote that this must be a bad time of year for ex-smokers. Actually, I prefer to see it as a good time of year because it proves to people that they can deal with the stresses and strains of holidays and seasonal changes without having to smoke. Quitting or staying off during easy times can still leave the recent quitter nervous about dealing with adversity. As this article discusses, quitting and staying free under times of adversty helps to build strength and confidence and should help to prove that any individual can stay free even under the toughest of times as long as he or she simply continues to stick to his or her commitment to never take another puff! Joel
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

16 Dec 2004, 06:54 #84

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27 Dec 2004, 04:59 #85

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28 Dec 2004, 03:54 #86

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31 Dec 2004, 11:30 #87

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02 Jan 2005, 07:23 #88

"The best time to quit is NOW.
No matter when now is."
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17 Jan 2005, 23:40 #89

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30 Jan 2005, 01:27 #90

You will often hear people say that it is not a good idea to attempt too many life changes when you are quitting. I also don't think that people need to go out of their way to make life changes when first quitting, and by no means should they ever be making major life decisions like quitting a job or ending a marriage the week they are quitting for in essence, they may not be working at the most rational level. Sometimes though major events do happen around people while they are quitting that are beyond their control. They didn't create the situations but they are forced to deal with them early on.

The advantage of such things happening early on is it teaches the ex-smoker how to institute problem solving and coping mechanisms that he or she once thought cigarettes were they only effective tool you had. Cigarettes were never an effective mechanism for either of these issues--all they did was help smoker to put off problem solving and to deliver a drug that was pulling him or her out of withdrawal when facing stressful circumstances.

Cigarettes never helped a smoker cope with stress--all they did was pull the smoker out of withdrawal that the stress was inducing that would not have actually been occurring if the person were not an active smoker at the time. It was a false calming effect.

The way people will recognize this over time is to get through new stresses and life changes, coming through them smoke free and doing an honest assessment comparing how they dealt with them this time and how you dealt with and felt when they experienced similar circumstances in the past while they were still a smokers.

People will usually realize in retrospect that they did overcome the traumatic times quicker and more effectively as ex-smokers. They will survive all life changes with their health, their quit and their life more intact as long as they always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

03 Feb 2005, 09:22 #91

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19 Feb 2005, 02:27 #92

You will often hear people say that it is not a good idea to attempt too many life changes when you are quitting.

I also don't think that people need to go out of their way to make life changes when first quitting, and by no means should they ever be making major life decisions like quitting a job or ending a marriage the week they are quitting for in essence, they may not be working at the most rational level. Sometimes though major events do happen around people while they are quitting that are beyond their control. They didn't create the situations but they are forced to deal with them early on.




The advantage of such things happening early on is it teaches the ex-smoker how to institute problem solving and coping mechanisms that he or she once thought cigarettes were they only effective tool you had. Cigarettes were never an effective mechanism for either of these issues--all they did was help smoker to put off problem solving and to deliver a drug that was pulling him or her out of withdrawal when facing stressful circumstances.




Cigarettes never helped a smoker cope with stress--all they did was pull the smoker out of withdrawal that the stress was inducing that would not have actually been occurring if the person were not an active smoker at the time. It was a false calming effect.




The way people will recognize this over time is to get through new stresses and life changes, coming through them smoke free and doing an honest assessment comparing how they dealt with them this time and how you dealt with and felt when they experienced similar circumstances in the past while they were still a smokers.




People will usually realize in retrospect that they did overcome the traumatic times quicker and more effectively as ex-smokers. They will survive all life changes with their health, their quit and their life more intact as long as they always remember to never take another puff!




Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 May 2005, 18:03 #93

You will often hear people say that it is not a good idea to attempt too many life changes when you are quitting. I also don't think that people need to go out of their way to make life changes when first quitting, and by no means should they ever be making major life decisions like quitting a job or ending a marriage the week they are quitting for in essence, they may not be working at the most rational level. Sometimes though major events do happen around people while they are quitting that are beyond their control. They didn't create the situations but they are forced to deal with them early on.

The advantage of such things happening early on is it teaches the ex-smoker how to institute problem solving and coping mechanisms that he or she once thought cigarettes were they only effective tool you had. Cigarettes were never an effective mechanism for either of these issues--all they did was help smoker to put off problem solving and to deliver a drug that was pulling him or her out of withdrawal when facing stressful circumstances.

Cigarettes never helped a smoker cope with stress--all they did was pull the smoker out of withdrawal that the stress was inducing that would not have actually been occurring if the person were not an active smoker at the time. It was a false calming effect.

The way people will recognize this over time is to get through new stresses and life changes, coming through them smoke free and doing an honest assessment comparing how they dealt with them this time and how you dealt with and felt when they experienced similar circumstances in the past while they were still a smokers.

People will usually realize in retrospect that they did overcome the traumatic times quicker and more effectively as ex-smokers. They will survive all life changes with their health, their quit and their life more intact as long as they always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

17 May 2005, 03:43 #94

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25 May 2005, 19:12 #95

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13 Jun 2005, 01:41 #96

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21 Jul 2005, 20:24 #97

You will often hear people say that it is not a good idea to attempt too many life changes when you are quitting. I also don't think that people need to go out of their way to make life changes when first quitting, and by no means should they ever be making major life decisions like quitting a job or ending a marriage the week they are quitting for in essence, they may not be working at the most rational level. Sometimes though major events do happen around people while they are quitting that are beyond their control. They didn't create the situations but they are forced to deal with them early on.

The advantage of such things happening early on is it teaches the ex-smoker how to institute problem solving and coping mechanisms that he or she once thought cigarettes were they only effective tool you had. Cigarettes were never an effective mechanism for either of these issues--all they did was help smoker to put off problem solving and to deliver a drug that was pulling him or her out of withdrawal when facing stressful circumstances.

Cigarettes never helped a smoker cope with stress--all they did was pull the smoker out of withdrawal that the stress was inducing that would not have actually been occurring if the person were not an active smoker at the time. It was a false calming effect.

The way people will recognize this over time is to get through new stresses and life changes, coming through them smoke free and doing an honest assessment comparing how they dealt with them this time and how you dealt with and felt when they experienced similar circumstances in the past while they were still a smokers.

People will usually realize in retrospect that they did overcome the traumatic times quicker and more effectively as ex-smokers. They will survive all life changes with their health, their quit and their life more intact as long as they always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Aug 2005, 20:48 #98

You will often hear people say that it is not a good idea to attempt too many life changes when you are quitting. I also don't think that people need to go out of their way to make life changes when first quitting, and by no means should they ever be making major life decisions like quitting a job or ending a marriage the week they are quitting for in essence, they may not be working at the most rational level. Sometimes though major events do happen around people while they are quitting that are beyond their control. They didn't create the situations but they are forced to deal with them early on.

The advantage of such things happening early on is it teaches the ex-smoker how to institute problem solving and coping mechanisms that he or she once thought cigarettes were they only effective tool you had. Cigarettes were never an effective mechanism for either of these issues--all they did was help smoker to put off problem solving and to deliver a drug that was pulling him or her out of withdrawal when facing stressful circumstances.

Cigarettes never helped a smoker cope with stress--all they did was pull the smoker out of withdrawal that the stress was inducing that would not have actually been occurring if the person were not an active smoker at the time. It was a false calming effect.

The way people will recognize this over time is to get through new stresses and life changes, coming through them smoke free and doing an honest assessment comparing how they dealt with them this time and how you dealt with and felt when they experienced similar circumstances in the past while they were still a smokers.

People will usually realize in retrospect that they did overcome the traumatic times quicker and more effectively as ex-smokers. They will survive all life changes with their health, their quit and their life more intact as long as they always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

12 Sep 2005, 08:00 #99

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23 Oct 2005, 01:46 #100

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