I will not smoke today!

Joel
Joel

January 3rd, 2003, 10:05 pm #21

The following question was raised today by Lena today: "I guess I am wondering if this is normal to think about your quit and the fact that you don't smoke constantly. " In essence, it is not natural to think about your quits constantly. The more natural reaction experienced by people is that they stop thinking about their quits all together. While it is the most natural reaction, it is not the most preferable. For when a person finally stops thinking about his or her quit, he or she will often start taking his or her quit for granted. The ex-smoker will stop reinforcing his or hers reasons for having quit and in a real sense, start taking the quit for granted. The biggest mistake is that the person is going to forget the simple fact that he or she was totally controlled by nicotine and that he or she is still a nicotine addict.

Then when a tougher time period in life is encountered, the ex-smoker is totally unprepared with how to face it and is left traumatized by smoking thoughts or worse yet, due to the lack of sufficient motivation and reinforced resolve, he or she allows himself or herself to relapse.

Then the person will be stuck either thinking about quitting all of the time again, or worse yet, not thinking about quitting and just sustaining an addiction that is slowly crippling or killing the person.

Force yourself to remember what your life was like when you were a smoker, what your life was like when you were first quitting, and where you are now. You are no longer spending thousands of dollars a year to smell bad, be socially ostracized, face constant withdrawal or periods of excessive smoking, destroying your lungs, overworking your heart, and basically destroying your body piece by piece at a cellular level. To never face this kind of existence again, daily try to keep yourself reminded as to why you first decided and are still determined to stick with your commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

August 5th, 2003, 9:17 pm #22

Whether you are off for a day, a week, a month, a year, a decade, or, if medical science makes some major leaps and you make it off for a century, remind yourself each day of the favor you have done for yourself by quitting smoking and recommit for today to stick to your plan to never take another puff!
Joel
Quote
Share

Couragegrl2
Couragegrl2

August 5th, 2003, 10:15 pm #23

THANK YOU for that Joel ...
I can see now -- even after this short amount of time has smoking seems very DISTANT .... something that doesn't apply to me today .... and while that's really positive to help with not getting caught up in the 'drama' of quitting .... I can see where I need to keep my guard up and my attention focused ...
I can't see you how much that NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF little concept has completely altered how I looked at quitting. I didn't realize that every other quit - and there have been many since I started smoking at 13 (I'm 42 now) - every other quit had the 'someday I can have just one and it will be okay' going on in the back of my mind ..... and, thank to that slogan that big lie is DEAD and GONE ... which is fabulous because now maybe I won't be DEAD and GONE!
be well, sus
Quote
Share

RealNameNotAvailable
RealNameNotAvailable

October 10th, 2003, 3:04 am #24

Dear Joel and all participants,

I wd like to record that I find this affirmation effective. I now find that I am saying it each morning first thing, as if setting the agenda for the day and clarifying to myself that to smoke 'is not an option' as they say. The effect it has is to make the whole thing seem simple and 'not a problem'. I have just made it my screensaver.

Best wishes,

Stephanie H (quit 2 weeks 2 days; saved $58)
Quote
Share

qwerty (green)
qwerty (green)

October 20th, 2003, 2:37 am #25

Hi Joel, I have a question: How should one deal with the apparently conflicting statements "I will not smoke today" and "Never Take Another Puff"? Taken literally, these are mutually exclusive goals/ideas--Today versus Never--not to mention the concept of "one hour at a time". Perhaps it's merely a case of semantics but some clarification might help, especially for those just starting out in their quits. One suggestion that comes to mind is to change "never" to "don't." Although I lean toward the daily approach, maybe some sort of combination of the two ideas would be best.


Thanks,
qwerty

181 days (5m, 4w)
NTAP, NTAN
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

October 20th, 2003, 4:06 am #26

Hello Qwerty:

I just kicked up a few posts that kind of explore the history of the Never Take Another Puff letters. I should note that they were not originally written for people who were quitting smoking. They were in fact written for people who had already quit smoking in my clinics. They were being used to to reinforce people who had already quits. There is quite a different mindset for people who are smoking and first thinking about quitting as opposed to people who are already quit and worried about being able to stay off. Most of the people for whom those letters were written were now concerned with their ability to stay off over the long-term.

I now often use terms before the comment never take another puff like, "If you wish to stay free you must know to never take another puff!" This is not saying that a person cannot take another puff, it is just saying that in order to stay successfully smoke free that they can enver take another puff. Never take another puff is a road map. If you want to stay off you keep remembering it, if you decide you want to go back to smoking all you need to do is disregard it. If you are not totally sure that you want to stay off smoking forever it is fine to just stick it out another day to see how you feel tomorrow. When it comes to the point though that you know your that your desire is to stay smoke free forever just know that to be able to accomplish this goal is still to work at reaffirming your commitment each and every day to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

Buttercup9339
Buttercup9339

December 17th, 2003, 10:04 pm #27

Thanks for re-posting this Joel.

One of my fears is that I will become complacent in my quit. As you said, "Complacency causes your guard to drop and you may begin to forget the reasons you wanted to quit".

Angie
One month, two days, 3 hours, 3 minutes and 11 seconds. 321 cigarettes not smoked, saving $56.22. Life saved: 1 day, 2 hours, 45 minutes.
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 5th, 2004, 9:28 am #28

Baby Steps!
Abandon the concept of measuring success in term quitting forever and see each day as the full and complete victory it truly is. Why take big bites that promise only one celebration (after you're dead) when you can take little bites and celebrate each and every accomplishment! The next few minutes are all that matter and each is entirely doable! John
Last edited by John (Gold) on November 6th, 2009, 9:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 15th, 2004, 9:46 pm #29

At moments it may not seem easy but it is simple as ...
Last edited by John (Gold) on November 6th, 2009, 9:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 10th, 2005, 9:20 pm #30

Last edited by John (Gold) on November 6th, 2009, 9:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Joanne Gold
Joanne Gold

June 15th, 2005, 10:47 am #31

" The fact is, restating the simple concept of "not smoking today" is not only important when you first quit. You should restate this upon waking for the rest of your life. Each day you should start with "I'm not going to smoke today." Equally important, each day you should end congratulating yourself and feeling a sense of pride and accomplishment for achieving your worthwhile goal. "
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

September 11th, 2005, 3:06 am #32

Whether you are off for a day, a week, a month, a year, a decade, or, if medical science makes some major leaps and you make it off for a century, remind yourself each day of the favor you have done for yourself by quitting smoking and recommit for today to stick to your plan to never take another puff!
Joel
Quote
Share

John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 14th, 2006, 5:43 am #33

" The fact is, restating the simple concept of "not smoking today" is not only important when you first quit. You should restate this upon waking for the rest of your life. Each day you should start with "I'm not going to smoke today." Equally important, each day you should end congratulating yourself and feeling a sense of pride and accomplishment for achieving your worthwhile goal. "
I will not use nicotine today!
Last edited by John (Gold) on November 6th, 2009, 9:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

February 15th, 2006, 4:40 am #34

Whether you are off for a day, a week, a month, a year, a decade, or, if medical science makes some major leaps and you make it off for a century, remind yourself each day of the favor you have done for yourself by quitting smoking and recommit for today to stick to your plan to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

February 4th, 2008, 6:33 am #35

From: John (Gold) Sent: 1/4/2004 8:28 PM
Baby Steps!
Abandon the concept of measuring success in term quitting forever and see each day as the full and complete victory it truly is. Why take big bites that promise only one celebration (after you're dead) when you can take little bites and celebrate each and every accomplishment! The next few minutes are all that matter and each is entirely doable! John
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on November 6th, 2009, 9:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Share

Joel
Joel

May 15th, 2008, 10:04 pm #36

Whether you are off for a day, a week, a month, a year, a decade, or, if medical science makes some major leaps and you make it off for a century, remind yourself each day of the favor you have done for yourself by quitting smoking and recommit for today to stick to your plan to never take another puff!

Joel
Quote
Share

FreedomNicotine
FreedomNicotine

November 6th, 2009, 10:01 pm #37

" The fact is, restating the simple concept of "not smoking today" is not only important when you first quit. You should restate this upon waking for the rest of your life.
Each day you should start with "I'm not going to smoke today."
Equally important, each day you should end congratulating yourself and feeling a sense of pride and accomplishment for achieving your worthwhile goal. "
Excerpt from Joel's original letter.

Simple, quick, effective. Do this, it works!
Quote
Share

Johnnie
Johnnie

August 25th, 2010, 4:42 pm #38

My quit's got legs and I pledge to not ever quit quitting!
Quote
Share

grandmajojo
grandmajojo

March 19th, 2011, 3:57 pm #39

For me the motto is not another puff. and when I get up in the morning and when i catch myself unconsciously planning to take a smoke break i tell myself out loud I don't smoke anymore. then i walk away if the anxiousness is strong. if its not too strong i can just focus on something. This past week has opened my eyes to how much I planned my day around having a cigarette. I like walking much better instead now!
Quote
Share

Joined: November 13th, 2008, 2:04 pm

March 19th, 2011, 7:54 pm #40

Quote
Like
Share

Joe J free
Joe J free

March 22nd, 2012, 4:47 pm #41

Actively strive to successfully remain smoke free and maintain all the associated perks-the physical, emotional, economic, professional and social benefits of not being an active smoker. Always start your day off with the statement "I won't smoke today." Always end your day with a self-affirmation and sense of pride and accomplishment for once again winning your daily battle over your addiction. And always remember between your waking up and the ending of your day to - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!
Quote
Share

lizisfree
lizisfree

June 25th, 2012, 3:51 pm #42

On July 4th, I will be free for 8 months.  I will not smoke today nor ever take that one puff again!
Quote
Share

bizz
bizz

September 26th, 2012, 4:37 pm #43

It's amazing how well this little piece of advice has been working for me the last week.

I have a very close friend that was a very serious alcoholic that is now 10 years sober. He wasn't the kind of drinker that would get blasted at night and pass out drunk. He was the type that would wake up in the morning and slam a pint of vodka before work. Then he would sneak drinks all day at work. Once he was done for the day it was a 5th of vodka when he got home. When you would talk to him you would never know he was at such a high level of dependency. He just never seemed drunk. In fact the day he checked himself into detox, they sent someone down to do a psych evaluation because they didn’t believe him when he said how much he had to drink.


When he got out of rehab after 30 days he wasn’t sure if he was going to make it. A big part of his income at the time was spent playing bass in a rock band, surrounded by people drinking booze in clubs every Friday and Saturday night. When I asked him how he got through he told me “I just didn’t drink, real simple” His coping mechanism was the same thing that a lot of us use. Instead of saying “I won’t smoke today”, for him it was “I won’t drink today” He said it’s gotten better, but on occasion he still has to himself that to avoid a temptation.

He’s taught me a lot about how to deal with situations that might induce craves. You can’t hide from them forever; sooner or later you have to learn to deal with them. In fact he’s kind of become my defacto sponsor through this quit. Even though his addiction is different than mine, his knowledge on how to deal with different situations really helps me cope.

One day at a time!
Quote
Share

soulagement
soulagement

September 26th, 2012, 7:53 pm #44

Hi Bizz, no, the whole concept of not hiding from real life but confronting it when you quit is incredibly liberating. Killing triggers, one at a time. Smokers like to believe (I sure used to) that it's a "lesser" addiction. It's not.
NTAP
Quote
Share