I will not smoke today!

Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Jul 2001, 11:19 #11

Some words to live by--literally. You will live longer and better as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

21 Sep 2001, 00:08 #12

Hi Steve
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

30 Sep 2001, 20:13 #13

One more for Gormo
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

29 Oct 2001, 20:23 #14

Always a good one to start out a work week, or a non-work week for that fact.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

30 Nov 2001, 21:08 #15

Whether you are off for a day, a week, a month, a year, a decade, or, if medical science makes some major leaps and you make it off for a century, remind yourself each day of the favor you have done for yourself by quitting smoking and recommit for today to stick to your plan to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

01 Jan 2002, 18:43 #16

For our friends in New Zealand: this concept is as important on January 2 as it was on January 1, or July 1 or any other date in any other year for the rest of your life. Repeat "I will not smoke today" for the rest of your life and you will prove to the world as well as to yourself that it was within your capabilities to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

08 Oct 2002, 22:32 #17

Wow, haven't seen that one for a while. This really brings back memories. Waking up early, thinking about a smoke, remembering "Oh no, I'm trying to quit." Having a real argument/discussion with myself while lying there in the bed. Am I going to smoke today or not? Each time the decision was, one more day. Just one, but just for today I'm not going to smoke. Each day I told myself-maybe tomorrow, but let's give it one more day.

It worked.

Dave

Taking things one day at a time for 5 Months 2 Weeks 6 Days 12 Hours 32 Minutes 54 Seconds, with an extra $835.08 in my pocket. Somewhere there are an extra 6073 smokes.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

08 Dec 2002, 21:28 #18

Thanks Joel. This article, to me, is what cessation is all about. I Will Not Smoke Today. Plain and simple. I know the alternative.

Gormo
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

12 Dec 2002, 23:33 #19

Just a few minutes or even seconds a day can help to secure long-term quits.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Dec 2002, 12:59 #20

For Oscar: I think this is the one he was referring to.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

03 Jan 2003, 22:05 #21

The following question was raised today by Lena today: "I guess I am wondering if this is normal to think about your quit and the fact that you don't smoke constantly. " In essence, it is not natural to think about your quits constantly. The more natural reaction experienced by people is that they stop thinking about their quits all together. While it is the most natural reaction, it is not the most preferable. For when a person finally stops thinking about his or her quit, he or she will often start taking his or her quit for granted. The ex-smoker will stop reinforcing his or hers reasons for having quit and in a real sense, start taking the quit for granted. The biggest mistake is that the person is going to forget the simple fact that he or she was totally controlled by nicotine and that he or she is still a nicotine addict.

Then when a tougher time period in life is encountered, the ex-smoker is totally unprepared with how to face it and is left traumatized by smoking thoughts or worse yet, due to the lack of sufficient motivation and reinforced resolve, he or she allows himself or herself to relapse.

Then the person will be stuck either thinking about quitting all of the time again, or worse yet, not thinking about quitting and just sustaining an addiction that is slowly crippling or killing the person.

Force yourself to remember what your life was like when you were a smoker, what your life was like when you were first quitting, and where you are now. You are no longer spending thousands of dollars a year to smell bad, be socially ostracized, face constant withdrawal or periods of excessive smoking, destroying your lungs, overworking your heart, and basically destroying your body piece by piece at a cellular level. To never face this kind of existence again, daily try to keep yourself reminded as to why you first decided and are still determined to stick with your commitment to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Aug 2003, 21:17 #22

Whether you are off for a day, a week, a month, a year, a decade, or, if medical science makes some major leaps and you make it off for a century, remind yourself each day of the favor you have done for yourself by quitting smoking and recommit for today to stick to your plan to never take another puff!
Joel
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Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 20:35

05 Aug 2003, 22:15 #23

THANK YOU for that Joel ...
I can see now -- even after this short amount of time has smoking seems very DISTANT .... something that doesn't apply to me today .... and while that's really positive to help with not getting caught up in the 'drama' of quitting .... I can see where I need to keep my guard up and my attention focused ...
I can't see you how much that NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF little concept has completely altered how I looked at quitting. I didn't realize that every other quit - and there have been many since I started smoking at 13 (I'm 42 now) - every other quit had the 'someday I can have just one and it will be okay' going on in the back of my mind ..... and, thank to that slogan that big lie is DEAD and GONE ... which is fabulous because now maybe I won't be DEAD and GONE!
be well, sus
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Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 23:25

10 Oct 2003, 03:04 #24

Dear Joel and all participants,

I wd like to record that I find this affirmation effective. I now find that I am saying it each morning first thing, as if setting the agenda for the day and clarifying to myself that to smoke 'is not an option' as they say. The effect it has is to make the whole thing seem simple and 'not a problem'. I have just made it my screensaver.

Best wishes,

Stephanie H (quit 2 weeks 2 days; saved $58)
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

20 Oct 2003, 02:37 #25

Hi Joel, I have a question: How should one deal with the apparently conflicting statements "I will not smoke today" and "Never Take Another Puff"? Taken literally, these are mutually exclusive goals/ideas--Today versus Never--not to mention the concept of "one hour at a time". Perhaps it's merely a case of semantics but some clarification might help, especially for those just starting out in their quits. One suggestion that comes to mind is to change "never" to "don't." Although I lean toward the daily approach, maybe some sort of combination of the two ideas would be best.


Thanks,
qwerty

181 days (5m, 4w)
NTAP, NTAN
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

20 Oct 2003, 04:06 #26

Hello Qwerty:

I just kicked up a few posts that kind of explore the history of the Never Take Another Puff letters. I should note that they were not originally written for people who were quitting smoking. They were in fact written for people who had already quit smoking in my clinics. They were being used to to reinforce people who had already quits. There is quite a different mindset for people who are smoking and first thinking about quitting as opposed to people who are already quit and worried about being able to stay off. Most of the people for whom those letters were written were now concerned with their ability to stay off over the long-term.

I now often use terms before the comment never take another puff like, "If you wish to stay free you must know to never take another puff!" This is not saying that a person cannot take another puff, it is just saying that in order to stay successfully smoke free that they can enver take another puff. Never take another puff is a road map. If you want to stay off you keep remembering it, if you decide you want to go back to smoking all you need to do is disregard it. If you are not totally sure that you want to stay off smoking forever it is fine to just stick it out another day to see how you feel tomorrow. When it comes to the point though that you know your that your desire is to stay smoke free forever just know that to be able to accomplish this goal is still to work at reaffirming your commitment each and every day to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 07 Jan 2009, 19:16

17 Dec 2003, 22:04 #27

Thanks for re-posting this Joel.

One of my fears is that I will become complacent in my quit. As you said, "Complacency causes your guard to drop and you may begin to forget the reasons you wanted to quit".

Angie
One month, two days, 3 hours, 3 minutes and 11 seconds. 321 cigarettes not smoked, saving $56.22. Life saved: 1 day, 2 hours, 45 minutes.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Jan 2004, 09:28 #28

Baby Steps!
Abandon the concept of measuring success in term quitting forever and see each day as the full and complete victory it truly is. Why take big bites that promise only one celebration (after you're dead) when you can take little bites and celebrate each and every accomplishment! The next few minutes are all that matter and each is entirely doable! John
Last edited by John (Gold) on 06 Nov 2009, 21:49, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Jan 2004, 21:46 #29

At moments it may not seem easy but it is simple as ...
Last edited by John (Gold) on 06 Nov 2009, 21:50, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Jan 2005, 21:20 #30

Last edited by John (Gold) on 06 Nov 2009, 21:54, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

15 Jun 2005, 10:47 #31

" The fact is, restating the simple concept of "not smoking today" is not only important when you first quit. You should restate this upon waking for the rest of your life. Each day you should start with "I'm not going to smoke today." Equally important, each day you should end congratulating yourself and feeling a sense of pride and accomplishment for achieving your worthwhile goal. "
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Sep 2005, 03:06 #32

Whether you are off for a day, a week, a month, a year, a decade, or, if medical science makes some major leaps and you make it off for a century, remind yourself each day of the favor you have done for yourself by quitting smoking and recommit for today to stick to your plan to never take another puff!
Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

14 Jan 2006, 05:43 #33

" The fact is, restating the simple concept of "not smoking today" is not only important when you first quit. You should restate this upon waking for the rest of your life. Each day you should start with "I'm not going to smoke today." Equally important, each day you should end congratulating yourself and feeling a sense of pride and accomplishment for achieving your worthwhile goal. "
I will not use nicotine today!
Last edited by John (Gold) on 06 Nov 2009, 21:55, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

15 Feb 2006, 04:40 #34

Whether you are off for a day, a week, a month, a year, a decade, or, if medical science makes some major leaps and you make it off for a century, remind yourself each day of the favor you have done for yourself by quitting smoking and recommit for today to stick to your plan to never take another puff!

Joel
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Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Feb 2008, 06:33 #35

From: John (Gold) Sent: 1/4/2004 8:28 PM
Baby Steps!
Abandon the concept of measuring success in term quitting forever and see each day as the full and complete victory it truly is. Why take big bites that promise only one celebration (after you're dead) when you can take little bites and celebrate each and every accomplishment! The next few minutes are all that matter and each is entirely doable! John
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 06 Nov 2009, 21:59, edited 1 time in total.
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