I Want "Something"

Retraining the conscious mind
Maisie Mai
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

11 Jun 2008, 05:12 #71

thanks for bringing this thread to the top. I am nearly 6 weeks into my final quit and I can't say its been difficult, its been illuminating and satisfying and has made me feel proud.... but all day today I've had the most annoying 'I need something' time that has lasted all day and all evening. Grrrr... I'm so mad!
Anyway the positive side is that although I felt strongly that I needed a cigarette/nicotine I knew I didn't want to smoke because..its horrible..it wouldn't solve anything etc etc so I didn't and that makes me proud. I think the worst of today is over now and tomorrow is another day.
Maisie
I am proud to announce that I have been totally nicotine free for 1 Month, 1 Week, 1 Day and 11 minutes (39 days). I have saved £187.23 by not smoking 780 cigarettes. I have saved 2 Days and 17 hours of my life. My Quit Date: 02/05/2008 22:00
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bluekate4
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 23:21

11 Jun 2008, 07:04 #72

I'm also really glad this thread has been brought forward... I'm a week quit (today!), and I've had two types of cravings- the conscious, "I want one" type, and they unconscious "I need something!" kind. This thread is definitely helpful.
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aryeh36.ffn
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

16 Jun 2008, 02:12 #73

Wow!
This describes exactly what I have been going through.
I want "something"
Two things offer me satisfaction so far
a) This website satisfies my need for the elusive"something"
that I need.
b) a long walk gets rid of the feeling for a while.
But they are not the same. The effects are not the same.
This website satisfies.
The walk does not satisfy the need - only removes it for a while.

Anyway, Thanks Dave for this beautiful insight
And thank you JoeJ for bringing this post to the top

Aryeh
I have been quit for 3W 2D 6h 11m (23 days). I have saved $122.09 by not smoking 325 cigarettes. I have saved 1D 3h 5m of my life. My Quit Date: 5/23/2008 8:01 AM
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WavyDavy7
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

16 Jun 2008, 21:55 #74

I am sometimes conscious enough to recognize how similarly cravings of all kinds show up. There's a sensation of some undefinable thing missing. Maybe it's food; maybe it's something advertised on TV. In the past I would just light up a cigarette and for 20-30 minutes that hole would be filled.

Unfortunately the product ultimately doesn't live up to it's promise and we addicts often discover too late how our desires and fulfillments have been perverted as our lung function disappears.
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jeffazi
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 23:21

10 Jul 2008, 02:29 #75

That "wanting something" feeling really hits home with me. I've had that feeling several times since I quit. I didn't really connect it with being a craving. It was more of a disquieting feeling like the feeling you get when you know you've forgotten to do something and can't remember what it is. Good post Dave.

jeff Image
I quit smoking 2 Weeks, 2 Days, 22 hours, 28 minutes and 51 seconds (16 days) ago.
I have saved $80.44 by not smoking 338 cigarettes.
I have saved 1 Day, 15 hours and 26 minutes of my life.
My Quit Date: 6/22/2008 3:00 PM
NTAP!
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johnnynonic
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:58

02 Jan 2009, 22:23 #76

Recognizing needs

Appendix to "Recognizing Needs"
Last edited by johnnynonic on 15 Nov 2009, 14:36, edited 1 time in total.
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rosy
Joined: 18 Oct 2009, 08:31

15 Nov 2009, 08:44 #77

SweetLorraine (Gold) wrote:
One of the things that I liked about smoking was the instant reward (sick reward - but none the less) instant gratification of desire. Long after falling nicotine levels were over with memories of the "aaah" feeling would surface (triggers).

Everyone's quit is different my choices wouldn't necessarily work for anyone else. I will say that not smoking is a lot more effort in the beginning, part of that work is figuring out what you are feeling, what you want and what you need/want to do about it.


Now rather than smoking when I'm tired I rest, when I'm upset I take deep slow breaths and try to put things in perspective, if I'm angry I may yell or scrub something or go for a walk, when I'm hungry I eat. When I want a little reward for work well done I might read a chapter in a good book or play a game. Everything I ever did as a smoker I now do and do better. But all of these responses had to be learned because each of those situations used to be automatic signals to smoke.


Maybe this is way more than you had in mind. For me smoking had invaded every aspect of my life and once exorcised life is simpler and much more real.


Lorraine
Yesterday I spent the day with the family at large which involved all the stresses of negotiating family politics.
I never actually craved a cigarette when I was there but went I got home, something was missing. It wasn't a desire for a cigarette - just something to end the family day once I got home.
I didn't find that something, I came here instead.
However, I only found this thread today, explaining this feeling of wanting something. When I used to come home after family events, I'd sit on the balcony and of course have a few cigarettes to "help" make the adjustment of being back in the sanity & quiet of my home.
So this was the" something" I felt yesterday - it meant learning new ways of being, new ways of settling back home after a hectic day with the family..
While I have quoted Lorraines post, this whole thread helped in understaning this "wanting Something" issue.
Thanks
Free & Healing
Rosy
Stopped Smoking for One Month, Five Days, 16 Hours and 42 Minutes, by avoiding the use of 1211 nicotine delivery devices. Quit Day : 09/10/2009.
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GirlyGirlRealtor
Joined: 08 Dec 2009, 12:01

13 Dec 2009, 21:23 #78

Hi all!
I am new to this site.....been nicotine free for 13 days. This thread explains exactly how I feel constantly....like I just want "something" and don't know exactly what so I find myself eating non-stop to try and find the "something" I am wanting!!! Eating, onbviously is not the "something" my body wants or I would feel satisfied at some point! It was so great to realize that many others are going through this same feeling and I am not losing it. Thanks!
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JGH
Joined: 13 Feb 2010, 12:15

17 Feb 2010, 22:44 #79

Sarah52 directed me here  -- a post I had not yet seen (and I've read hundreds, maybe more).  And, this was IT -- this was the feeling I've been experiencing the past few days -- the one that was starting to gnaw at my brain and really test my resolve and I didn't understand why.  I know that if I hadn't done all the reading here that I have, I would have succumbed to the I-want-something -- and would just have assumed that of course it was nicotine that I wanted.  

But that would have been a lie, because I actually haven't missed the nicotine (well, at least after the first several awful days of physical withdrawal).  But, there has been a void -- literally --  a sort of hollow feeling inside, right below my lungs, above my diaphragm and in the center of my being.  Nothing has helped it -- not deep, deep breathing; not walking on the beach; not going to the dog park and pretending to like all the owners of poorly trained dogs whose owner; not candle-lit hot baths with a 2005 French bordeaux;  not my third pound of baby carrot sticks; not even the bag of caramel rice cakes that I inhaled earlier today.  That bloody void still exists although I am more exercised, cleaner, more polite, and so-bloody-full.

But, further in the original I-want-something post, Melissa wrote this: "Maybe once we get past the initial high drama of quitting smoking - the physical sensations, the most pressing psychological triggers, etc. - we rediscover a little bit of us that's waited stuck all those years for a chance to say, "Hey, I want ... something." And now, rather than it being about smoking, we get a chance to realize it's really about growing up, learning to know and name and act responsibly upon our desires."

Light bulb.  Glaring illumination.  Scary thought -- but one that makes so much sense that I can now ruminate on that rather than the void.  

So, thanks Sarah52 for showing me the way -- and thanks Dave and Melissa for helping me make sense of the seemingly senseless.

Now at the grand total of 9 days, 20 hours, 51 minutes, 48 seconds -- which means I have foregone 385 nicotine sticks and saved me $154 which is now being saved to go to Alaska to see the Aurora Borealis.
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LINDAS
Joined: 11 Feb 2010, 18:39

18 Feb 2010, 15:59 #80

 Thanks, Kiwi, for thanking Dave for addressing this idea.  My big stumbling block in finding "Something" is..that my "Something" has been "Smoking", the "Onlything" for years and years.  Now, before everyone starts "boo-ing", let me say, I knew this going in to NTAP.  Having smoked since I was 12 yrs old, being single for the last 24 years, going through 'thick & thin' ALL BY MYSELF (snif..snif)....guess who was always there?  Yup,  Mr. Cigarette.  While contemplating just what a BIG Something I was going to need, I came up with this analogy:  I had been with Mr. Cigarette for so long that it was like we were married.  So, I'm the battered wife...yeah?  I mean, this (guy) is killing me, literally, and I can't leave him???   Yeah/No!  After trying to quit every few months, I decided I was 'never going to quit trying to quit', using each failure as knowledge and tools for the next quit.  I felt that what I really needed and wanted was some kind of interaction, "buddy system", or something.  I mean, there is meetings for AA and NA, I just couldn't believe that in my community, with 2 hospitals, didn't have any kind of Quit organizations. Then I ran across WhyQuit. It's my kind of quit style, cold turkey!  So, I "girded up my loins" and here I am at
 1 Week, 3 Days, 8 hours, 50 minutes and 46 seconds (10 days). I have saved $108.86 by not smoking 311 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Day, 1 hour and 55 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 2/7/2010 11:13 PM
  This is where I need some help...I got through the first 72 hours (finally!) and now I have all of these emotions: angry, disappointed, sadness, etc, etc. Can anyone guide me to info on that?  My attitude is this:  It may not get easier, but it sure gets better.  I want to really believe that all of the time!
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