MomTo5Girls
MomTo5Girls

July 1st, 2006, 2:07 pm #31

Got it, JoeJ!! Thank you!
Kimm - No nicotine in this body for Seventeen Days, 8 Hours and 7 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 21 Hours, by avoiding the use of 260 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $71.57. Date of Quit: 6/13/2006
Last edited by MomTo5Girls on June 27th, 2009, 4:08 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Rayne
Rayne

August 25th, 2006, 9:59 pm #32

Thank you. I am sure that will help the next crave
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danneo8
danneo8

October 2nd, 2006, 7:06 am #33

Whew Joel, thank heavens you are here. I have been having an internal debate for the past 2 hours about having just one. When I got home I thought, just have one little smoke, go outside on the deck and have a drink and a smoke. I almost did and then thought, what about the 5 weeks you've put in on this quit? What about telling people that you "caved", what about starting all over again and not being able to post here? And STILL I wrestled with having just one. I don't know what it is about early evening on Sunday but boy am I vulnerable and boy am I glad I went to the library and had so much supportive material to read. The things you wrote so long ago about the one being all and thinking that it isn't just one, it's the 30 a day again, etc. etc. really hits the spot. Thanks again. I hope this nasty crave is over and I wish they'd just end but I know they won't any time soon. I do know that I can conquer the crave if I keep my mind in the library and read, read, read. Stick with it everyone and NTAP. Thanks for listening to this little rant. pj
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Jazzlady4
Jazzlady4

October 17th, 2006, 2:35 am #34

I remember over 9 years ago when I thought I could have just one cigarette with some friends. I bought a pack on the way home, and continued to smoke until 5 weeks ago. At the time, I was one year smoke free, but got caught again, and didn't think I would ever free myself from the hold they had on me. It took 9 years, but am free again and am not going back into captivity again.
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auntvaleria
auntvaleria

October 17th, 2006, 7:02 pm #35

This thought went through my mind several times over these last few days. "I want one" was corrected to "I want a carton; 200 right now; and 200 next week and the next week", and on and on. I could picture where I would be immediately with "just one". What an evil addiction this is. For today, I remain free. One day at a time and NTAP!
aunt valeria
I have been quit for 7 Months, 3 Weeks, 10 hours, 32 minutes and 19 seconds (235 days). I have saved $647.45 by not smoking 4,708 cigarettes. I have saved 2 Weeks, 2 Days, 8 hours and 20 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 2/23/2006 7:30 PM
Last edited by auntvaleria on June 27th, 2009, 4:09 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

February 3rd, 2007, 9:45 pm #36

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0.78mb
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10/18/06
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amyjo010907
amyjo010907

February 8th, 2007, 7:24 am #37

That's exactly what keeps me free, knowing that you can't & won't have just one.

AmyJo - Free and Healing for Twenty Nine Days, 19 Hours and 19 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 1 Day and 13 Hours, by avoiding the use of 447 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $100.72.
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Parker GOLD
Parker GOLD

March 8th, 2007, 8:50 am #38

This helped me so much in the beginning of my quit. I would think about having one and remember that one always, always, always led to more. One pack and then another and another and another. When you are an addict one is too many; a hundred is not enough. Don't fool yourself. You can't have just one.
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aimhigh80
aimhigh80

March 8th, 2007, 9:38 am #39

Boy, did I need to read this today! I got GREEN on 2/26, and it seems like I've been wanting ONE smoke ever since! I know that it would be "back to a pack!", so I'm focusing on my quit reasons. Some of you wrote me about a "plateau"...I guess that's where I'm at.
aimhigh80
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

April 10th, 2007, 12:21 am #40

From: Parker - GOLD! Sent: 3/7/2007 7:50 PM
This helped me so much in the beginning of my quit. I would think about having one and remember that one always, always, always led to more. One pack and then another and another and another. When you are an addict one is too many; a hundred is not enough. Don't fool yourself. You can't have just one.

Some additional Parker wisdom - Don't Get Discouraged!
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

May 28th, 2007, 7:27 am #41

The Law of Addiction
The administration of a drug to an addict will cause reestablishment of dependence upon the addictive substance at the old level of use or greater.
Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on June 27th, 2009, 4:04 am, edited 4 times in total.
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Joel
Joel

July 18th, 2007, 2:28 am #42

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"I want one!" Dial Up
1.01mb
High Speed
5.36mb
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0.78mb
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05:33
10/18/06
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

September 29th, 2007, 7:52 pm #43

From: Parker - GOLD! Sent: 3/7/2007 7:50 PM
This helped me so much in the beginning of my quit. I would think about having one and remember that one always, always, always led to more. One pack and then another and another and another. When you are an addict one is too many; a hundred is not enough. Don't fool yourself. You can't have just one.
Some additional Parker wisdom - Don't Get Discouraged!
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on June 25th, 2009, 2:43 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

October 21st, 2007, 10:42 pm #44

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"I want one!"
Dial Up
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5.36mb
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0.78mb
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05:33
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10/18/06
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iwannalive
iwannalive

November 14th, 2007, 2:01 am #45

I wish I never had this addiction. But I do so I have to get it through my head. One is too many and a hundred is not enough.


Diane - Free and Healing for Thirty Days, 2 Hours and 3 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 3 Days and 15 Hours, by avoiding the use of 1053 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $337.37.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

November 14th, 2007, 2:24 am #46

Try to be patient with the pace of recovery, Diane, as you've come far these past 30 days and invested much. In the first three days you detoxed your mind and body of all nicotine and reached peak withdrawal, you've greeted and extinguished the vast majority of your nicotine feeding cues (all but infrequent cues, seasonal or holiday related ones) and with each extinguished cue you've reclaimed yet another aspect of life. It's like putting a puzzle together.
Now you're into the final phase and dealing with those pesky conscious thoughts of wanting, that combine with years of smoking rationalizations and the slowly dwindling influence of those old dopamine aaah memories that belong to a true drug addict who at that moment was again starving off urges or even the onset of early withdrawal.
This likely being the longest and most gradual recovery phase of all, it's normal to want it to be over and done. It's a place we all once stood. At times it can feel like the rose bud has actually stopped opening, that with each passing day the distance between moments of challenge is not growing longer, the challenges shorter and generally a bit less intense. But just as the human eye cannot see the rose bud as it opens, it can at times be difficult to see the gradual beauty slowly unfolding before you. But we promise you, it's happening.
Diane, if you'll simply stay in the here and now, just one day at a time and then celebrate today's victory, before you know it those pesky thoughts of wanting will become the exception not the rule. This is your gift to you, Diane. Hold it close and protect it above all else.
Remember, you're not fighting a whole pack or even a whole cigarette but just that one powerful puff of nicotine that 8 to 10 seconds later would cause nicotine to occupy at least 40% of your brain's nicotinic type acetylcholine receptors, causing a dopamine explosion that, even through a dizzy mind and burning lungs, your mind's pay attention pathways will make nearly impossible (in the short term) to forget. It could all be over that fast, with both freedom and a solid month of the most intense healing your body has ever known flushed like a toilet.
Baby steps, just today. Yes you can, Diane! Congratulations on your first full month of freedom and healing. We're with you in spirit.
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long!
John (Gold x8)
Last edited by John (Gold) on June 26th, 2009, 4:05 am, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

January 21st, 2008, 12:22 am #47


"I want one"
"I want one"
"I want one"
The Law of Addiction
The administration of a drug to an addict will cause reestablishment of dependence upon the addictive substance at the old level of use or greater.
"I want one" is the biggest lie of all. Haven't the lies lasted long enough? Isn't it time to allow truth to help free your mind from lingering smoking fixations? Why tease yourself with lies?
"One is too many, a thousand never enough."
Last edited by John (Gold) on July 1st, 2009, 12:37 am, edited 4 times in total.
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

February 23rd, 2008, 2:50 am #48

....BUT do you want them ALL back?
Didn't think so. 'Just One' is an Illusion. 'JUST' ONE is a LIE. Just One is an impossibility.
All or None is the only quantity you can choose.
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on June 27th, 2009, 4:12 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Joel
Joel

April 15th, 2008, 8:55 pm #49

Video title Dial Up High Speed MP3 Audio Length Created
"I want one!" 1.01mb 5.36mb 2.48mb 05:33 10/18/06
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

June 22nd, 2008, 11:14 pm #50

Look at smoking in real terms and you will walk away from each urge with a sense of relief and accomplishement. Fantasize about them and you may walk away with a feeling of deprivation. You are not depriving yourself of anything, you are ridding yourself of a deadly addiction. See them for what they are and you will stay forever resolute to never take another puff!

Joel
=
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on June 26th, 2009, 4:14 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

July 20th, 2008, 9:43 pm #51

Video title Dial Up High Speed MP3 Audio Length Created
"I want one!" 1.01mb 5.36mb 2.48mb 05:33 10/18/06
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ConnieLynn062408
ConnieLynn062408

July 26th, 2008, 9:27 am #52

From: John (Gold) Sent: 11/13/2007 1:24 PM
Try to be patient with the pace of recovery, Diane, as you've come far these past 30 days and invested much. In the first three days you detoxed your mind and body of all nicotine and reached peak withdrawal, you've greeted and extinguished the vast majority of your nicotine feeding cues (all but infrequent cues, seasonal or holiday related ones) and with each extinguishment reclaimed yet another aspect of life. It's like putting a puzzle together.
Now you're into the final phase and dealing with those pesky conscious thoughts of wanting, that combine with years of smoking rationalizations and the slowly dwindling influence of those old dopamine aaah memories that belong to a true drug addict who at that moment was again starving off urges or even the onset of early withdrawal.
This likely being the longest and most gradual recovery phase of all, it's normal to want it to be over and done. It's a place we all once stood. At times it can feel like the rose bud has actually stopped opening, that with each passing day the distance between moments of challenge is not growing longer, the challenges shorter and generally a bit less intense. But just as the human eye cannot see the rose bud as it opens, it can at times be difficult to see the gradual beauty slowly unfolding before you. But we promise you, it's happening.
Diane, if you'll simply stay in the here and now, just one day at a time and then celebrate today's victory, before you know it those pesky thoughts of wanting will become the exception not the rule. This is your gift to you, Diane. Hold it close and protect it above all else.
Remember, you're not fighting a whole pack or even a whole cigarette but just that one powerful puff of nicotine that 8 to 10 seconds later would cause nicotine to occupy at least 40% of your brain's nicotinic type acetylcholine receptors, causing a dopamine explosion that, even through a dizzy mind and burning lungs, your mind's pay attention pathways will make nearly impossible (in the short term) to forget. It could all be over that fast, with both freedom and a solid month of the most intense healing your body has ever known flushed like a toilet.
Baby steps, just today. Yes you can, Diane! Congratulations on your first full month of freedom and healing. We're with you in spirit.
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long!
John (Gold x8)
John, your excellent posts have been one of best reasons that I have been able to quit smoking for over a month now. But...........early on in my quit I read the above post, and just can't get this out of my mind. The benefits of not smoking are already beginning to be very apparent to me and important to me, but the statement in the post about relapsing and causing a dopamine explosion is constantly calling me. It's like telling me why I smoked all those years, and teasing me that it is still there if only I have a smoke. In other posts I see that we should expect a smoke to taste horrible, be hot, make us cough,etc. But I can't help but wonder and fantasize about what is written above. How good would a smoke be after all this time? I smoked for 46 years, and am still having to go over my reasons for quitting many times a day. So far, so good, I have resisted. But I can't get this out of my mind, and I can't trust myself completely yet because of this fantasy. Any suggestions?
Thanks,
Connie
Last edited by ConnieLynn062408 on June 27th, 2009, 4:25 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Joined: January 16th, 2003, 8:00 am

July 26th, 2008, 7:54 pm #53

Last edited by Sal GOLD.ffn on June 25th, 2009, 2:48 am, edited 1 time in total.
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candle61
candle61

July 26th, 2008, 11:15 pm #54

Hello Connie Lynn (I love your name ). I don't have any suggestion to you regarding " I want one ". You know that I have smoked for most of my life, more than 40 years. What I can do is to tell you a story. Before my final quit, I have had quite a fewones. The last, before the final one, happened when I was away with my husband in a very beautiful National Park. I was not smoking for 3 days and was quite happy with it. Then a spider bit my husband and we came back home in a hurry as his hand and arm were starting to swell really bad. I got scared, we drove to a hospital and while he was waiting to be examined, I went to the street, debated with myself about having one cigarette, went to a bar, got a pack and lit a cigarette. No, it did not taste good, it tasted bad, the nicotine kicked my heart and brains real strong, I almost fainted, but got used very quicky to the thing again. It took me about 2 months to come back to my initial and definitive resolve to never take another puff. So, hang on there,having one it's a bad and depressing experience because you betrayed yourself. The only reason for quitting smoking is because you love life and you love yourself. So please please don't go on thinking that nicotine is good, it's horrible. And baby steps , one day at a time, don't give in, go to the movies watch Batman and think a little of us here, your quit brothers and sisters. Have a nice day!
PS: sometimes, breathing very deeply through your mouth helps a lot.
Last edited by candle61 on June 26th, 2009, 4:17 am, edited 1 time in total.
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John (Gold)
John (Gold)

July 27th, 2008, 2:15 am #55

Hello Connie and congratulations on your first full month of freedom and healing after 45 years of bondage. We're drug addicts, Connie, and at a minimum you're still facing coming to terms with both the small mountain of "aaah" memories you created during those four and a half decades, but more importantly all the rationalizations created to justify going after them.
I doubt this brings you much comfort but at one month into recovery nearly everyone here focused upon those still lingering memories too, and for most that was prior to posts such as this one mentioning them. Maybe there's something to "out of sight out of mind" but if I was a betting man I'd bet that right about now, with by far the vast majority of trigger extinguishing behind you, that your attention would begin focusing heavily upon this phase of recovery, that you'd be wading through them anyway, as it's the only path home.
Maybe I should have tied this in better with my post about the "Final Truth." Although the underlying dopamine explosion is there, the sensation associated with it cannot match existing replenishment memories, as here on day 33 of your recovery there is nothing functionally missing and nothing in need of replenishment. Your tank isn't low, there's no early withdrawal onset anxieties building because you've once again waited a bit too long, and that building anxiety isn't riddled with a growing sense of depression.
None of this means that this much loved (I'm sure) great-grand-mother can't soon restore the need to replenish, in fact, once that first puff is taken, full relapse is in motion and it's now all but guaranteed.
The 1990 Brandon study examined lapse and relapse in smokers who'd successfully completed a two week stop smoking program. Aside from finding that 88% who "tasted" a cigarette went on to experience full relapse, it also documented the primary emotion felt immediately following smoking nicotine. Consider that each who lapsed had already succeeded in fully navigating physical withdrawal. Consider that their brains had re-sensitized. Reflect on the fact that their mind's sense of nicotine normal no longer existed, that there was no chemical missing and nothing in need of replenishment, that the brain's sense of homeostasis had been restored. So what was their prime emotion following relapse?
The vast majority reported an immediate negative reaction. Among them, 13% felt depressed and hopeless, 33% experienced anxiety and tension, 16% were angry and irritated, and 12% felt boredom or fatigue, while only 3.6% reported what most nicotine addicts would probably have expected, that they felt relaxed.


It is good you're thinking all this through, Connie, not bad. As Joel reminds us, it's impossible to relapse by thinking, it's action that destroy.
Connie, those "aaah" memories don't belong to you but to an actively feeding drug addict whose chemical dependency was arrested 33 days ago. If you want "aaah" there's plenty of healthy ones to be had. Just grab hold of one of those grandchildren or great-grands of yours and give them a big big hug.

Millions of words here at Freedom but still just one rule ... no nicotine today!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long Connie!

John (Gold x9)
Last edited by John (Gold) on June 27th, 2009, 4:49 am, edited 6 times in total.
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