"I think I have decided to go back to smoking"

"I think I have decided to go back to smoking"

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

04 Mar 2002, 21:01 #1

I wrote the following letter to a member who had quit for 18 days and wrote a post saying he was probably going back to smoking that particular evening. This was my reply to him. I don't know if this member is off smoking or if he is even still a member. But the reply applies to everyone here who ever thinks they consciously really want to go back to smoking.

You are at a point that all of our members are at who are nicotine free for at least three days. You are free to choose now. You can choose to smoke nothing--you can also choose to smoke full-fledged again until it cripples then kills you. If your choice is to relapse and go back to smoking again you know what to do. Tonight will be as good as any time. Although, as long as your goal is to smoke until it kills you, why fret the rest of the afternoon, now is as good as time as to relapse as any.

So again--as long as your goal is to smoke till it kills you--you know what to do. As long as you know you will be smoking tonight, today would be a good time to do some estate planning too. Get your will, living will, durable power of attorney, organ donation papers signed in case there are any organs worth harvesting after smoking takes it tolls throughout your body, and maybe call your insurance agent and see about getting some disability insurance. Just in case cigarettes don't cause a sudden death scenario, you want to make sure to have money available in the event of a long disabling illness. Cigarettes can cause plenty of them.

One of the most common ways cigarettes accomplish this goal is to destroy your lungs and breathing ability. Who knows for sure there will be enough money to take care of your needs when you can no longer breath on your own. In fact, if money gets too tight and you can't work, affording cigarettes will be a real problem then. So insurance shopping will be a good way to spend the afternoon now. By the way, you will have to state that you are going for the insurance because you are planning on becoming a long-term smoker. Insurance companies need to know this so they can adjust your premiums accordingly. If you were to mislead them and say you are a non-smoker, when the disease strikes and you expect payments--you may be in for a terrible shock to find out that you will not collect for signing up under false pretenses.

Another good thought for today is maybe prepay for a plot and funeral arrangements now. You can save a bundle. Most of us don't like to think about such things but it sounds like you are planning for a life and death decision tonight so why not make a number of them.

So again--as long as your goal is to start your slow motion suicide into action, you know what to do. If by any chance you were not really considering going back to smoking till it cripples and kills you--you may want to have some contingency plans set up for tonight too. Maybe take the money that is going to be earmarked to smoking for the next month, which may be hundreds of dollars and go out and have a really good time treating yourself to things that wont kill you. You will be able to do a lot more of this as long as you always remember to never take another puff!

Joel
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mirigirl (silver)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:00

04 Mar 2002, 22:18 #2

Oh My God
I think I'll stick to
Never Taking Another Puff!
yqs mirigirl
Last edited by mirigirl (silver) on 30 Jun 2009, 01:06, edited 1 time in total.
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Alice
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

05 Mar 2002, 07:38 #3

SMOKING IS SLOW MOTION SUICIDE
I didn't know that that's what I was embarking on in 1965 when I hid in the woods and sneaked cigarettes. And I didn't know, when I finally became a full fledged addict in or around 1972 that I would become involved in the MOST horrible self destructive habit. I didn't know that cigarette smoke would begin to shield me from emotional growth and pain and would slowly be the reason that my lungs became sick and diseased. I use to be so active. Now I'm afraid I have a chronic lung problem. We call it asthma but I know what I did. I apologize to my poor body.
Now. The madness has stopped. I can look in the mirror and see a happier person but I can't go back to 1972.
If you can get through one day, you can get through the rest of your life. One minute at a time. Feeling alot better physically and spiritually.
Thanks Joel. Maybe we'll help somebody See the Light and Feel Freedom.
YQS
Alice
Bronze
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

28 Mar 2002, 02:59 #4

ImageFor anyone who thinks they have ever made or may one day still make a conscious decision to smoke.
Last edited by Joel on 30 Jun 2009, 01:08, edited 1 time in total.
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Hilary )
Joined: 09 Jan 2009, 20:42

28 Mar 2002, 22:49 #5

I feel driven to respond to this thread.
I fear complacency, I fear the nagging thought of 'just one.' My rational brain knows that the 'just one' will not be that. My rational brain even knows that the just one will not be the one with the 'ahhhhhh' feeling. It also knows that that 'just one' just may be the one to jumpstart a major illness.
This thread does ensure that reality flies directly into one's face in an unavoidable manner .... I fear the strength of addictive substances (or the weakness of the addicted?) which causes one to say, "yes, but" or "so?"
Oh well, as I said, I felt driven to respond. Thanks for the opportunity to prioritize my fears.
One year, two months, three weeks, two days, 16 hours, 7 minutes and 48 seconds. 8058 cigarettes not smoked.
Last edited by Hilary ) on 30 Jun 2009, 01:10, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Apr 2002, 00:33 #6

Image For anyone fixating on "a cigarette." Smoking "a cigarette" or just taking a drag is tantamount to relapsing to an addiction to thousands of cigarettes a year, tens of thousands of cigarettes over a decade and hundreds of thousands of cigarettes over a shortened lifetime. It also translates into ruined health and a quality impaired life. It means smelling like a cigarette, and facing chronic withdrawals. Remember cigarettes for what they were and what they were going to do to you over time and you will never question your desire to never take another puff!
Joel
Last edited by Joel on 30 Jun 2009, 01:11, edited 1 time in total.
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Hillbilly(Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

14 Jun 2002, 23:21 #7

For MikeyD

You're at a critical point in your quit--There's a post in here somewhere that talks about "I'm going to go ahead and smoke one and just get it over with". I couldn't find that thread, but this one is quit applicable, also.

Withdrawal does not last forever--if it did, none of us would ever quit. Remember, if you relapse now your choices are to smoke for the rest of your life or go through withdrawal again. Do you really want to do either?

Just quit for today.

Dave

I have chosen not to smoke for 1 Month 3 Weeks 6 Days 10 Hours 57 Minutes 19 Seconds. Somewhere there are 2010 extra cigarettes.
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richard This is It GOLD
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:59

14 Jun 2002, 23:46 #8

"Remember, if you relapse now your choices are to smoke for the rest of your life or go through withdrawal again"

The relapsers choice: "Smoke for the Rest of your life or Go through withdrawal again"

Dave, that's brilliant...... did you just write that...? or is it written somewhere else... it's sooooooooooooo simple....

I'm printing it up right now for my notice board...

-richard
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Hillbilly(Gold)
Joined: 19 Dec 2008, 00:03

15 Jun 2002, 00:06 #9

me with an original thought?

we haven't met, have we? LOL
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John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Aug 2002, 20:39 #10

Mike, please read this! There is no telling if any of us would ever come this far again. The science and studies behind how nicotine damages the human mind is just now beginning to filter out. They know so little but what they have learned is alarming. Relapse is one of only two choices but I hope you'll look at a few of the recent issues that have been raised -

Does nicotine destroy memory, recall and learning?
National Institute for Health and Medical Research, Paris - May 2002

Can nicotine - by itself - cause lung cancer?
University of Minnesota Cancer Center - November 2000
Stanford University School of Medicine - July 2001
Stanford University School of Medicine - July 2001
Children's Hospital Medical Center of Cincinnati - Nov. 2000
Last edited by John (Gold) on 30 Jun 2009, 01:24, edited 1 time in total.
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