smurfetteirl
smurfetteirl

May 10th, 2004, 4:31 am #21

I love this one Joel
Last edited by smurfetteirl on June 30th, 2009, 1:41 am, edited 2 times in total.
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EvaMP1
EvaMP1

September 2nd, 2004, 11:40 pm #22

Love it Joel. You always know just what to say. This is definitely a keeper.
Eva
I have been quit for 4 Weeks, 1 Day, 13 hours and 40 minutes (29 days). I have saved $116.79 by not smoking 591 cigarettes. My Quit Date: 8/3/2004
Last edited by EvaMP1 on June 30th, 2009, 1:36 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Joel
Joel

September 18th, 2004, 1:42 am #23

I saw where a member wrote the following comment:

"Following the incident--I actually considered throwing in the towel & running down to 7-11 for 20 death sticks." That statement clearly indicated that the person was clearly thinking about relapsing. That statement read as a conscious thought to smoke. I think this string is perfect for any person who is playing any such mind games with himself or herself. I am going to pop up a few other strings which deals with any one who is thinking that under the right or wrong conditions that he or she may consider throwing away his or her quit, along with his or her health and his or her life. The only way to keep your quit and its benefits intact is to stay totally committed under all circumstances to never take another puff!

Joel
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ShutterJulieG
ShutterJulieG

December 23rd, 2004, 11:01 pm #24

This is a great one..thank you! And even though dying from cigarettes tends sometimes to be what people think will happen to someone else not them (afterall, "I" can be the exception to the statistics" so the junkie thinks) the money is in and of itself a wonderful, real-time, tangible, right now, benefit to fight off the real-time, right now, crave. In just a little over a week, I have saved about $68.00! That is a lot of money in 9 days.....I take a weekly "allowance" in cash that used to be for lunches and cigarettes. Last night, I was straightening out my wallet and "found" all this money! Whoo Hoo......
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GoldenDivamom1972
GoldenDivamom1972

January 20th, 2005, 11:08 am #25

Thanks for pulling up this thread. *If* I were on the verge of relapse (and thank the gods that I'm not!), this would be enough to bring me back from the edge.

Amy
Free and Healing for Sixteen Days, 15 Hours and 59 Minutes, while extending my life expectancy 1 Day and 17 Hours, by avoiding the use of 500 nicotine delivery devices that would have cost me $125.08.
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Ladybug592
Ladybug592

February 20th, 2005, 5:02 pm #26

Thank you so much, Joel. !
I've been feeling depressed today, thank God the thought of having a cigarette didn't cross my mine because if it did, I would of gone to 7-11 and gotten some. I'm glad I read your post now, because if this 'down mood' continued tomorrow, I definitely would have smoked.
The reason of my depression is that on Tuesday I'm going to see the Doctor and find out if my IPF (idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis) has gotten worst or remain the same, there is no cure for it and no, is not caused by smoking, but it sure didn't help when I didn't know that I had it and was smoking. I found out 6 months ago, and this is the first time the Doctor can make a comparison with a previous CT and all the other tests I went through.
We'll see what happens...
Ana
I have been quit for 43 days. Saved $355.04 by not smoking 1,972 cigarettes.
Last edited by Ladybug592 on June 30th, 2009, 1:40 am, edited 1 time in total.
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BruceAK
BruceAK

April 21st, 2005, 3:09 pm #27

Joel,

Thanks so much...this letter is really what I needed to read tonight.

...And thank you, Tobi, for linking to it from my journal...

I'm printing 2 copies right now. One for the refidgerator, and one for my wallet.

-Bruce
---------------------------
Nicotine free for 2 months, 11 days, 27 minutes and 55 seconds (72 days) = 1728 smokes
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auntvaleria
auntvaleria

March 16th, 2006, 11:50 am #28

Great post! It hits the nail right on the head!
aunt valeria I have been quit for 2 Weeks, 6 Days, 2 hours, 20 minutes and 25 seconds (20 days). I have saved $55.26 by not smoking 401 cigarettes. I have saved 1 Day, 9 hours and 25 minutes of my life. My Quit Date: 2/23/2006 7:30 PM
Last edited by auntvaleria on June 30th, 2009, 1:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
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4Taylor
4Taylor

May 12th, 2006, 1:07 am #29

Wow!!! I've been having trouble in the evenings. I feel like something is missing and I want to smoke. Reading this letter REALLY put things in prespective!!!!

Kristin

I have been quit for 1 Week, 3 Days, 10 hours, 7 minutes and 38 seconds (10 days). I have saved $52.10 by not smoking 260 cigarettes. I have saved 21 hours and 40 minutes of my life.
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Mitzi499
Mitzi499

July 6th, 2006, 9:27 am #30

Well I may have, but I've just changed my mind. I am not a nicotine junkie any longer, and nothing is going to get in the way. I may not have got in all right, but smoking ain't gonna change that. This has been too hard, and still is, to give up now.
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Joel
Joel

December 7th, 2006, 11:13 pm #31

For anyone fixating on "a cigarette." Smoking "a cigarette" or just taking a drag is tantamount to relapsing to an addiction to thousands of cigarettes a year, tens of thousands of cigarettes over a decade and hundreds of thousands of cigarettes over a shortened lifetime. It also translates into ruined health and a quality impaired life. It means smelling like a cigarette, and facing chronic withdrawals. Remember cigarettes for what they were and what they were going to do to you over time and you will never question your desire to never take another puff!
Joel
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Paula24066
Paula24066

March 18th, 2007, 12:51 am #32

A great way of looking at things
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Joel
Joel

September 10th, 2007, 12:04 am #33

I saw where a member wrote in two posts that she almost lost her quits. I am going to assume that this wording meant that she almost decided to smoke. This string and the post "I made a conscious decision to smoke" seem appropriate to bring up in lieu of this thought. They could have been written as "I almost made a conscious decision to smoke," or "I almost decided to go back to smoking." The same commentary in both strings would still apply.
Last edited by Joel on June 30th, 2009, 1:44 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joel

January 23rd, 2008, 8:52 pm #34

Video and audio file that ties into this string:
Video Title
Dial-Up
HS/BB
Audio
MP3*
Length
Added
Who wants to go back to smoking?
3.22mb
07:05
09/28/06



* New format that should work for people who have been unable to access our audio/video files in the past.
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SMJ69
SMJ69

February 8th, 2008, 11:59 am #35

Joel, 18 days for me!!!!!!!!!and I was just checking out the messages and saw this one stating I think I'm going to go back. I had to read it and then came to this video. I am just living with this one day at a time right now, but I am pretty convinced that with what I have learned and keep learning daily... this guy will never have that urge again. I was one of these sickos that WOULD go through ashtrays and garbage cans! Looking back ........ I can't believe it. Anyways thank you for every one of my 18 days. Its like your right here in my home with me if I need you :<)
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Horsehead 11
Horsehead 11

September 1st, 2008, 9:40 am #36

Very timely for me-Having a tough time, really tough day yesterday.
Peace
Jeff
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JoeJFree Gold
JoeJFree Gold

November 18th, 2008, 1:32 pm #37

From: Joel Sent: 9/9/2007 12:04 PM
I saw where a member wrote in two posts that she almost lost her quits. I am going to assume that this wording meant that she almost decided to smoke. This string and the post "I made a conscious decision to smoke" seem appropriate to bring up in lieu of this thought. They could have been written as "I almost made a conscious decision to smoke," or "I almost decided to go back to smoking." The same commentary in both strings would still apply.
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Joined: November 13th, 2008, 2:04 pm

January 23rd, 2009, 4:01 pm #38

I noticed some of the posts on this recovery board have not been viewed by any member since we moved our site. This post had no views yet. Now it is possible that new members are reading the materials at www.whyquit.com which is great. There are however numerous articles that we had at the old MSN board and now also at this new site that are not at the www.whyquit.com website. I will try to pop a few up a day for new members, but I do encourage people first joining to to through the boards that we have set up here and read through the articles. The more you read and understand, the more prepared you will be to stick to your personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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Cyndi
Cyndi

August 31st, 2009, 1:07 am #39

WOW!! Exactly what I needed today. Its scary what your junkie mind will try to do to you.
Thanks Freedom!!
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FreedomNicotine
FreedomNicotine

February 23rd, 2010, 6:40 pm #40

I noticed some of the posts on this recovery board have not been viewed by any member since we moved our site. This post had no views yet. Now it is possible that new members are reading the materials at www.whyquit.com which is great. There are however numerous articles that we had at the old MSN board and now also at this new site that are not at the www.whyquit.com website. I will try to pop a few up a day for new members, but I do encourage people first joining to to through the boards that we have set up here and read through the articles. The more you read and understand, the more prepared you will be to stick to your personal commitment to never take another puff.

Joel
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Mandevilla
Mandevilla

January 16th, 2011, 2:20 pm #41

"By forgetting the medical and psychological dangers associated with cigarette use, you may inadvertently strengthen the side which wishes to take one puff. This often results in more frequent urges of much greater intensity and duration...Never fixate on how nice one puff would be. You no longer have one puff as an option."

This was exactly the state I was in last night, and I got through another day.  I couldn't even "explain" to myself "why" I could not smoke, I just had to refrain from doing it -without negotiating with myself.  I distract myself, or turn my mind away from the subject - just to get through another minute. 

I am in the 16th day of my quit.  Past my 12th day, I started to feel such relief that it was not such a conscious struggle any more.  Then, last night, I went out to dinner with 2 family members who smoke.  They were courteous to not smoke around me, but the association was so strong....the association of them being my "smoking buddies."   I felt depressed while driving home - feeling alone and without companionship - like I could no longer be with my family members who smoke, without feeling torturous urges.  

Everything I have read here says it gets easier, confronting new associations makes them weaker.  Knowing all that, last night was still a hard one, or maybe just a new one for ME.  I have no doubt everyone on this site has had the same feelings of loss.  I have to learn how to replace that loss with happiness.  I am still learning how - and getting through it one day at a time, knowing that one puff is absolutely out of the question - even if I cannot rationally understand it at the moment.  This site got me through a cold turkey quit - and everything written here was true during that withdrawal so I choose to believe that everything else is truth also - especially to never, ever take another puff. 

If anyone has helpful ideas about how to be with smoking family members and not feel down or dejected, I am all ears. 
Thank you -everyone - for such helpful information here. 
Lisa (Mandevilla is a flower)
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Joined: November 13th, 2008, 2:04 pm

January 16th, 2011, 3:14 pm #42

The Palmolive Bottle Demonstration
Another slant on how to watch people smoke
Negative support from others
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Thoughts that seem worse than the first days urges[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]"You said it would get better. It's just as bad as the day I quit smoking!"[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF][font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Fixating on a cigarette.[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]I want one...[/font]
[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]"Just think about something else."[/font]
[/font]

[font=GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF][font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]The Urge Hits![/font][/font]
[font=GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF][font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Why am I still having "urges?"[/font][/font]
[font=GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF][font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF][/font][size=100][font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, ... g Triggers[/font][/font][/size]
[font=GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF][font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF][/font][size=100][font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, ... g Triggers[/font][/font][/size]

[font=GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]My Cigarette, My Friend[/font]
[font=GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Quitting can be a very lonely experience[/font]
[font=GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Emotional Loss Experienced from Quitting Smoking
"Boy, do I miss smoking!"
[/font]
Last edited by Joel Spitzer on January 16th, 2011, 3:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Mandevilla
Mandevilla

January 16th, 2011, 3:53 pm #43

Thank you so very, very much.
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Sarah52
Sarah52

January 18th, 2011, 6:45 pm #44

I love flowers. I'll have to research that one.

Mandevilla; you have truely conquered another trigger moment in your quit. I DOES get better. You have lost nothing; and gained back your life!

I too, felt a great loss, in the beginning. I cried many times. I really never thought i would be happy without my nicotine.

it's just our junkie addict thinking.. don't give in to it. it is powerful but you are stronger than nicotine.

the two articles Joel brought up, that I re-read often are MY CIGARETTE, MY FRIEND
AND QUITTING CAN BE A VERY LONELY EXPERIENCE.

you are doing fine! Keep up the great quit!

remember, 1=ALL
NTAP one day at a time
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Mandevilla
Mandevilla

January 18th, 2011, 11:48 pm #45

Thank you Sarah52!
I am in my 18th day now, and feeling stronger.  I am on guard, and will stay on guard, because I am too proud of my quit to take it for granted.  
I read something on here last night in the "the Urge Hits" thread that someone wrote.  Wow.  Revelation time.  It had something to do with attaching all our emotions to cigarettes.  I realized that every, single one of my "elevated" emotions was embedded in association with having a cigarette!  If I was REALLY happy - had to have a cigarette.  If I was REALLY angry - had to have a cigarette.  If I was REALLY sad - had to have a cigarette.  I have attached all solutions to my emotional highs and lows to having a cigarette.  I have some work to do to break those associations....but at least I realize now what I have to do.
What I also realized is that going out to eat with family members was not really the crux of what I was feeling - it was that I was having some personal stressors (have to pay taxes soon, have to solve a problem with the heating system in my home....etc) and what I was not putting front and center is that THOSE stress factors were what was making me anxious - not the association of my "smoking buddy" family members.  It was the other problems looming in my mind - and I was just piling on top of the mountain "and I can't even smoke with my family....woe is me....I cannot win...."   
After I read those thoughts (could have been a compilation of a few people) I took action on solving some of my "problems" the next day:  I called the IRS, I called a heating system company...and my anxiety lifted- it completely lifted. 

My anxiety had nothing to do with a cigarette - but I have conditioned my mind to think it does.  The subconscious mind can be re-conditioned - as John wrote in the thread I mentioned above:
 "it's likely that most all of us allowed our emotions to serve as feeding cues. The good part is that it doesn't take brainwashing or even repeated encounters with the same triggers before the subconscious mind abandons them as cues. The subconscious isn't capable of independent thought. It simply reacts to the input provided."

Anyway - thank you Sarah52 and John and Joel.
I am into my 18th day evening and learning so much.  My goodness, what an incredible journey.
Mandevilla Lisa
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