I Smoke Because I Like Smoking!

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

29 Mar 2007, 20:03 #31

From above:

Most smokers will attest to the fact that they feel that there were some "good" cigarettes that they smoked over their lifetime. When I use the term good, I don't want any confusion here that they were cigarettes that were good for them or even cigarettes that served a valuable purpose, like helping them get through a crisis. If a person survived a crisis while taking a cigarette, it is crucial that he or she recognizes that he or she would have gotten through the crisis even if he or she had not smoked. Hanging on to the belief that a cigarette was the only thing that got them through is setting the person up for future failure if a crisis is ever big enough. When I use the word "good" though, I simply mean there were some cigarettes that people truly enjoyed. One of the tactics I use at all my clinics is to ask for a show of hands of people who smoke 2 packs a day or more. I ask those people how many of them smoke because they like smoking. There are always going to be a number of 2 pack a day smokers who answer in the affirmative to the question.

I then go on to ask some very important follow-up questions. First I ask them to tell me which cigarettes stand out in their mind as being really great cigarettes on any given day. Usually they will offer up the first one or two they have when they wake up, the ones after meals and maybe one or two others that they have on certain breaks. Then you can see that they are thinking of other good ones but none seem to come to mind. I simply point out that we have a mathematical problem occurring here. They have come up with five to seven good cigarettes yet they are smoking forty or more cigarettes a day. Where are those other cigarettes?

Some of them are nasty as they smoke them. Some of them are marginal, they don't even remember smoking them soon after they were out. So here we have a few good cigarettes, a few lousy cigarettes and a whole bunch of what now seem to be insignificant cigarettes. It is then a matter of convincing the person to remember all of the cigarettes and helping them to understand that while there may be some good ones, they have to be accompanied by all of the mediocre and miserable ones, and when it comes down to it all of them, even the good ones are killing them.

Sometimes the original question I ask, of which cigarettes stand out as being really great cigarettes, sometimes appears to backfire. For some people will respond with a clear and resounding statement of "All of them." But to those people I just have one simple follow-up question which is, "How much do you like smoking? Do you like smoking more than you like something like, oh, I don't know...something like maybe...breathing?" It is quite evident that this is not the case for if it were it is very doubtful that they would be sitting in a Stop Smoking Clinic in the first place.

Here are a few posts that we have that explore the concept of people saying they enjoyed smoking. They are by no means the only articles on the site that address this issue. I think that anyone who is hanging on to the belief that in some way they really miss smoking needs to spend time reading the relapse prevention articles of Freedom, as well as the Reasons to Quit Sections, the addiction sections and the craves and thought sections. Equally important if not more so would be reading the stories at www.whyquit.com. When it really comes down to it stories like Byran's and Noni's and Kim's and Sean's and the countless others hit home the point that nothing that brings even some level of enjoyment is worth using if it brings on the kind of suffering and losses that accompanies using a product that is destructive and lethal. Smoking destroys the smoker and often goes on to devastate his or her loved ones left behind.

There may have been cigarettes that people think back to as good--but these good cigarettes were destroying tissue, overworking their heart and lungs and were keeping the addiction alive and well that was creating the need for tens or hundreds of thousands of cigarettes that would likely eventually have killed them. The only good cigarettes were the ones you tossed without lighting the day you quit, for they were the cigarettes that started you on your journey to become an ex-smoker--the cigarettes that you can vividly recall as the ones you destroyed when you finally committed to never take another puff!

Joel



"I smoke because I like smoking!"

"I smoke because I like the flavor"

"Boy, do I miss smoking!"

You smoke because you're a smoke-a-holic!

"why did I ever start smoking?"

"My cigarette, my friend"

Do members of our board seem to be too happy?
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

31 Jul 2007, 21:11 #32

From above:

Most smokers will attest to the fact that they feel that there were some "good" cigarettes that they smoked over their lifetime. When I use the term good, I don't want any confusion here that they were cigarettes that were good for them or even cigarettes that served a valuable purpose, like helping them get through a crisis. If a person survived a crisis while taking a cigarette, it is crucial that he or she recognizes that he or she would have gotten through the crisis even if he or she had not smoked. Hanging on to the belief that a cigarette was the only thing that got them through is setting the person up for future failure if a crisis is ever big enough. When I use the word "good" though, I simply mean there were some cigarettes that people truly enjoyed. One of the tactics I use at all my clinics is to ask for a show of hands of people who smoke 2 packs a day or more. I ask those people how many of them smoke because they like smoking. There are always going to be a number of 2 pack a day smokers who answer in the affirmative to the question.

I then go on to ask some very important follow-up questions. First I ask them to tell me which cigarettes stand out in their mind as being really great cigarettes on any given day. Usually they will offer up the first one or two they have when they wake up, the ones after meals and maybe one or two others that they have on certain breaks. Then you can see that they are thinking of other good ones but none seem to come to mind. I simply point out that we have a mathematical problem occurring here. They have come up with five to seven good cigarettes yet they are smoking forty or more cigarettes a day. Where are those other cigarettes?

Some of them are nasty as they smoke them. Some of them are marginal, they don't even remember smoking them soon after they were out. So here we have a few good cigarettes, a few lousy cigarettes and a whole bunch of what now seem to be insignificant cigarettes. It is then a matter of convincing the person to remember all of the cigarettes and helping them to understand that while there may be some good ones, they have to be accompanied by all of the mediocre and miserable ones, and when it comes down to it all of them, even the good ones are killing them.

Sometimes the original question I ask, of which cigarettes stand out as being really great cigarettes, sometimes appears to backfire. For some people will respond with a clear and resounding statement of "All of them." But to those people I just have one simple follow-up question which is, "How much do you like smoking? Do you like smoking more than you like something like, oh, I don't know...something like maybe...breathing?" It is quite evident that this is not the case for if it were it is very doubtful that they would be sitting in a Stop Smoking Clinic in the first place.

Here are a few posts that we have that explore the concept of people saying they enjoyed smoking. They are by no means the only articles on the site that address this issue. I think that anyone who is hanging on to the belief that in some way they really miss smoking needs to spend time reading the relapse prevention articles of Freedom, as well as the Reasons to Quit Sections, the addiction sections and the craves and thought sections. Equally important if not more so would be reading the stories at www.whyquit.com. When it really comes down to it stories like Byran's and Noni's and Kim's and Sean's and the countless others hit home the point that nothing that brings even some level of enjoyment is worth using if it brings on the kind of suffering and losses that accompanies using a product that is destructive and lethal. Smoking destroys the smoker and often goes on to devastate his or her loved ones left behind.

There may have been cigarettes that people think back to as good--but these good cigarettes were destroying tissue, overworking their heart and lungs and were keeping the addiction alive and well that was creating the need for tens or hundreds of thousands of cigarettes that would likely eventually have killed them. The only good cigarettes were the ones you tossed without lighting the day you quit, for they were the cigarettes that started you on your journey to become an ex-smoker--the cigarettes that you can vividly recall as the ones you destroyed when you finally committed to never take another puff!

Joel



"I smoke because I like smoking!"

"I smoke because I like the flavor"

"Boy, do I miss smoking!"

You smoke because you're a smoke-a-holic!

"why did I ever start smoking?"

"My cigarette, my friend"

Do members of our board seem to be too happy?
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Jun 2008, 05:04 #33

From above:

Most smokers will attest to the fact that they feel that there were some "good" cigarettes that they smoked over their lifetime. When I use the term good, I don't want any confusion here that they were cigarettes that were good for them or even cigarettes that served a valuable purpose, like helping them get through a crisis. If a person survived a crisis while taking a cigarette, it is crucial that he or she recognizes that he or she would have gotten through the crisis even if he or she had not smoked. Hanging on to the belief that a cigarette was the only thing that got them through is setting the person up for future failure if a crisis is ever big enough. When I use the word "good" though, I simply mean there were some cigarettes that people truly enjoyed. One of the tactics I use at all my clinics is to ask for a show of hands of people who smoke 2 packs a day or more. I ask those people how many of them smoke because they like smoking. There are always going to be a number of 2 pack a day smokers who answer in the affirmative to the question.

I then go on to ask some very important follow-up questions. First I ask them to tell me which cigarettes stand out in their mind as being really great cigarettes on any given day. Usually they will offer up the first one or two they have when they wake up, the ones after meals and maybe one or two others that they have on certain breaks. Then you can see that they are thinking of other good ones but none seem to come to mind. I simply point out that we have a mathematical problem occurring here. They have come up with five to seven good cigarettes yet they are smoking forty or more cigarettes a day. Where are those other cigarettes?

Some of them are nasty as they smoke them. Some of them are marginal, they don't even remember smoking them soon after they were out. So here we have a few good cigarettes, a few lousy cigarettes and a whole bunch of what now seem to be insignificant cigarettes. It is then a matter of convincing the person to remember all of the cigarettes and helping them to understand that while there may be some good ones, they have to be accompanied by all of the mediocre and miserable ones, and when it comes down to it all of them, even the good ones are killing them.

Sometimes the original question I ask, of which cigarettes stand out as being really great cigarettes, sometimes appears to backfire. For some people will respond with a clear and resounding statement of "All of them." But to those people I just have one simple follow-up question which is, "How much do you like smoking? Do you like smoking more than you like something like, oh, I don't know...something like maybe...breathing?" It is quite evident that this is not the case for if it were it is very doubtful that they would be sitting in a Stop Smoking Clinic in the first place.

Here are a few posts that we have that explore the concept of people saying they enjoyed smoking. They are by no means the only articles on the site that address this issue. I think that anyone who is hanging on to the belief that in some way they really miss smoking needs to spend time reading the relapse prevention articles of Freedom, as well as the Reasons to Quit Sections, the addiction sections and the craves and thought sections. Equally important if not more so would be reading the stories at www.whyquit.com. When it really comes down to it stories like Byran's and Noni's and Kim's and Sean's and the countless others hit home the point that nothing that brings even some level of enjoyment is worth using if it brings on the kind of suffering and losses that accompanies using a product that is destructive and lethal. Smoking destroys the smoker and often goes on to devastate his or her loved ones left behind.

There may have been cigarettes that people think back to as good--but these good cigarettes were destroying tissue, overworking their heart and lungs and were keeping the addiction alive and well that was creating the need for tens or hundreds of thousands of cigarettes that would likely eventually have killed them. The only good cigarettes were the ones you tossed without lighting the day you quit, for they were the cigarettes that started you on your journey to become an ex-smoker--the cigarettes that you can vividly recall as the ones you destroyed when you finally committed to never take another puff!

Joel



"I smoke because I like smoking!"

"I smoke because I like the flavor"

"Boy, do I miss smoking!"

You smoke because you're a smoke-a-holic!

"why did I ever start smoking?"

"My cigarette, my friend"

Do members of our board seem to be too happy?
Reply

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

05 Jun 2008, 05:07 #34

Related video:
Video Title Dial Up High Speed MP3 Length Created
Why do smokers smoke? 2.65mb 5.70mb 8.31mb 18:08 11/07/06
Reply

John (Gold)
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

08 Jul 2008, 21:55 #35

Image
Canadian Government's addiction warning label
"She does not smoke because she enjoys smoking, rather
she smokes because she does not enjoy not smoking."
There are only two choices, freedom or feed-em. Sadly many enslaved minds no longer see withdawal and recovery as their ticket home but some massive barrier beyond which they wrongly believe they are unable to pass. Others use the following sequence of faulty reasoning that fails to acknowledge a critical and empowering reality that most of us now fully accept, that our brain was chemically married to and dependent upon mandatory regular nicotine feedings. The reasoning goes like this:
False Logic
  • I do not do things that I do not enjoy
  • I smoke lots and lots and lots of cigarettes
  • Therefore I must really love smoking
True Logic !
  • I do not do things that I do not enjoy doing
  • I smoke lots and lots and lots of cigarettes
  • I know that each puff destroys a bit more of my body
  • I've read that nicotine is as addictive as illegal drugs
  • I tried quitting but couldn't seem to pull it off
  • I'm beginning to believe I may be a "real" drug addict!
Knowledge is power!
Breathe deep, hug hard, live long! John
Last edited by John (Gold) on 15 Feb 2009, 14:30, edited 1 time in total.
Reply

Joe J free
Joined: 18 Jan 2009, 06:57

08 Jun 2009, 18:43 #36

Last Paragraph of initial post:

So the next time you think of how much you once seemed to enjoy cigarettes, sit back and take a serious, objective look at why you have such an idealization of this dangerous product. Consider all the consequences. You will probably realize that you feel physically and mentally better now than you ever did as a smoker. Consider all of this and - NEVER TAKE ANOTHER PUFF!

Joel
Reply

FreedomNicotine
Joined: 06 Dec 2008, 16:58

15 Apr 2010, 14:48 #37

From above:

Most smokers will attest to the fact that they feel that there were some "good" cigarettes that they smoked over their lifetime. When I use the term good, I don't want any confusion here that they were cigarettes that were good for them or even cigarettes that served a valuable purpose, like helping them get through a crisis. If a person survived a crisis while taking a cigarette, it is crucial that he or she recognizes that he or she would have gotten through the crisis even if he or she had not smoked. Hanging on to the belief that a cigarette was the only thing that got them through is setting the person up for future failure if a crisis is ever big enough. When I use the word "good" though, I simply mean there were some cigarettes that people truly enjoyed. One of the tactics I use at all my clinics is to ask for a show of hands of people who smoke 2 packs a day or more. I ask those people how many of them smoke because they like smoking. There are always going to be a number of 2 pack a day smokers who answer in the affirmative to the question.

I then go on to ask some very important follow-up questions. First I ask them to tell me which cigarettes stand out in their mind as being really great cigarettes on any given day. Usually they will offer up the first one or two they have when they wake up, the ones after meals and maybe one or two others that they have on certain breaks. Then you can see that they are thinking of other good ones but none seem to come to mind. I simply point out that we have a mathematical problem occurring here. They have come up with five to seven good cigarettes yet they are smoking forty or more cigarettes a day. Where are those other cigarettes?

Some of them are nasty as they smoke them. Some of them are marginal, they don't even remember smoking them soon after they were out. So here we have a few good cigarettes, a few lousy cigarettes and a whole bunch of what now seem to be insignificant cigarettes. It is then a matter of convincing the person to remember all of the cigarettes and helping them to understand that while there may be some good ones, they have to be accompanied by all of the mediocre and miserable ones, and when it comes down to it all of them, even the good ones are killing them.

Sometimes the original question I ask, of which cigarettes stand out as being really great cigarettes, sometimes appears to backfire. For some people will respond with a clear and resounding statement of "All of them." But to those people I just have one simple follow-up question which is, "How much do you like smoking? Do you like smoking more than you like something like, oh, I don't know...something like maybe...breathing?" It is quite evident that this is not the case for if it were it is very doubtful that they would be sitting in a Stop Smoking Clinic in the first place.

Here are a few posts that we have that explore the concept of people saying they enjoyed smoking. They are by no means the only articles on the site that address this issue. I think that anyone who is hanging on to the belief that in some way they really miss smoking needs to spend time reading the relapse prevention articles of Freedom, as well as the Reasons to Quit Sections, the addiction sections and the craves and thought sections. Equally important if not more so would be reading the stories at www.whyquit.com. When it really comes down to it stories like Byran's and Noni's and Kim's and Sean's and the countless others hit home the point that nothing that brings even some level of enjoyment is worth using if it brings on the kind of suffering and losses that accompanies using a product that is destructive and lethal. Smoking destroys the smoker and often goes on to devastate his or her loved ones left behind.

There may have been cigarettes that people think back to as good--but these good cigarettes were destroying tissue, overworking their heart and lungs and were keeping the addiction alive and well that was creating the need for tens or hundreds of thousands of cigarettes that would likely eventually have killed them. The only good cigarettes were the ones you tossed without lighting the day you quit, for they were the cigarettes that started you on your journey to become an ex-smoker--the cigarettes that you can vividly recall as the ones you destroyed when you finally committed to never take another puff!

Joel



Related video:
Video Title Dial Up High Speed MP3 Length Created
Why do smokers smoke? 2.65mb 5.70mb 8.31mb 18:08 11/07/06


[*]I Smoke Because I Like Smoking! [*]I smoke because I like the flavor [*]"Boy, do I miss smoking!" [*]You Smoke Because You're A Smoke-a-holic! [*]Why did I ever start smoking? [*]My Cigarette, My Friend [*]Do members of our board seem to be too happy?
Reply

Joel Spitzer
Joined: 13 Nov 2008, 14:04

29 Oct 2011, 20:19 #38

Reply