"I made a conscious decision to smoke."

Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

10 Sep 2007, 00:02 #11

I saw where a member wrote in two posts that she almost lost her quits. I am going to assume that this wording meant that she almost decided to smoke. This string and the post  "I think I have decided to go back to smoking" " seem appropriate to bring up in lieu of this thought. They could have been written as "I almost made a conscious decision to smoke," or "I almost decided to go back to smoking." The same commentary in both strings would still apply.
Last edited by Joel on 25 Apr 2012, 10:22, edited 1 time in total.
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Joel
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Oct 2007, 02:46 #12

Video that ties in well with this string:
Video title Dial Up High Speed Audio Length Added
Who wants to go back to smoking? 2.61mb 25.9mb 1.05mb 07:05 09/28/06
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

06 Nov 2007, 02:20 #13

".......when a person has a bad moment and relapses saying to themselves that they made a conscious decision to smoke, it is usually an untrue statement. They don't make a conscious decision to smoke; they make a conscious decision to have a cigarette. These are two completely different decisions. It is easy to make a conscious decision to have a cigarette, when you think that is where it will end. Thinking in terms of limited quantity or limited time smoking is fantasizing about smoking. This fantasy will be a person's downfall."
(Part of Joel's original post.)
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forza d animo
Joined: 04 Apr 2005, 07:00

16 Nov 2007, 09:55 #14

The first paragraph of Joel's reply to this person who "made a conscious decision to smoke" lays bare the ignorance with which that decision was made and also sheds light upon a very important premise. If we are aware of the consequences of one puff, we can make a conscious decision NOT to smoke.

While the decision to remain nicotine free is not always easy, because we are, after all, addicted to nicotine, when the temptation arises, when we crave just one puff, what we know, must win out over what we feel or we may doom ourselves again to the endless cycle of smoking tobacco to prevent withdrawal.

While we may not recognize it early in our recovery, we were never victims of circumstance when we relapsed. We were victims of our own ignorance of nicotine addiction. When someone relapses, they are seeking relief. We must understand that nicotine offers no relief except to temporarily stave off withdrawl.

Make a conscious decision to live nicotine free.
Make a conscious decision to learn as much as you can about nicotine addiction.
Make a conscious decision to never take another puff.

Joseph
3x Gold
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JoeJFree Gold
Joined: 18 Dec 2008, 23:57

27 Nov 2007, 23:18 #15

It doesn't "just happen". Some outside agency or 'other person' does not swoop into your conscious rational brain and take control.
Losing control is still a choice to do so.
Who's to blame?
It is always a conscious decision to use. The mistake made in the past by many of us is in believing we can live the addict's ideal and control the quantity. Be honest with yourself. We cannot control the quantity or quit anytime we want to. We are addicts. That's how we ended up learning at this place called Freedom. The only thing we can control is what we choose to put in our body - or not. That is essentially our Freedom of Choice. Freedom to choose. Freedom to not use.
Don't kid yourself. It's always been and always will be within OUR ability to make a single CHOICE and not take a puff.

Joe J Free cause I choose to be.
Last edited by JoeJFree Gold on 15 Feb 2010, 01:24, edited 1 time in total.
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FreedomStaff
Joined: 30 Aug 2011, 12:44

25 Apr 2012, 10:25 #16

[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF].......[/font]when a person has a bad moment and relapses saying to themselves that they made a conscious decision to smoke, it is usually an untrue statement. They don't make a conscious decision to smoke; they make a conscious decision to have a cigarette. These are two completely different decisions. It is easy to make a conscious decision to have a cigarette, when you think that is where it will end. Thinking in terms of limited quantity or limited time smoking is fantasizing about smoking. This fantasy will be a person's downfall.[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF][/font][font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Now in fact you are being forced to make a decision. Your body is going to demand it. The decision now is are you going to be a full-fledged smoker, under the criteria above, or are you going to quit again? If you don't make a decision and take action, the decision is already made. You are a smoker again. On the other hand if you decide to quit, then you may have to put up with the initial withdrawals and the struggles that accompany stopping smoking. Neither option is optimal, but one, as bad as it seems, is clearly better than the other is. One may be miserable; the other is potentially lethal.[/font]

[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]You started your post that this was the worst day of your life. If it is the day you go back to smoking, this may not be an inaccurate assessment. If it is the a day you almost lost a quit but got it back and never smoked again, well then in retrospect you will probably realize that today was a day that had bad components. But in the grand scheme of things it was the day you permanently quit smoking and in that real sense it was a good day too. This may be hard to see now but in time, smoke free time; this may become a very realistic assessment.[/font]

[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]This is a fight for your health and your life. Give it your all because the alternative is cigarette smoking and if cigarettes are given the opportunity, they will take your all. To keep your Freedom, your health and your life you must understand that your quit is contingent on knowing that to stay smoke free you must never take another puff![/font]

[font=ARIAL, GEORGIA, 'TIMES NEW ROMAN', TIMES, SERIF]Joel[/font]
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Joel Spitzer
Joined: 13 Nov 2008, 14:04

11 Dec 2015, 19:58 #17

Related video: Intentional relapses
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